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Troubleshooting Sonos on WiFi

Troubleshooting Sonos on WiFi

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Hello,

I have a Eero mesh network and have tried the troubleshooting steps above, putting the mesh network into bridge mode but my living room setup (beam, sub and 2x one SL) still disappears from the sonos app everyday! At least once A day I have to search for missing products or update the network on my living room surround setup so that it returns to the app. 
This has been ongoing for about a month now, nothing has changed on my network. As a worst case scenario, yesterday I factory restored the whole living room and still the living room disappears from my app. 
 

please help!!

Try a reserved or static IP. This fixes issues like this regularly when we come across systems that we haven’t installed. See our video below that details this and other fixes. Static IP starts at around 5:20.

 

 

 

I have all my devices (Arc, 2 SL’s and sub) hardwired and have WiFi disabled on all devices. Never had any issues. But I was told once by support while on the phone with them on a different subject that I should not be going 100% wired and only to attach the arc as wired and let everything else be wireless. Any thoughts as to why they suggested that?

It’s the original design of the system. However, if you’re experiencing no issues, I’d suggest leaving it alone. 

I’ll add my experience with Nest (Google) mesh and S1 products in case it helps someone:

When setting up for the first time with a mesh system make sure you setup the Sonos products with only the mesh router operational.  No mesh points or nodes powered on. Trying to set up Sonos products via mesh points has caused me all sorts of issues.  It seems (from my experience) the Sonos products need a direct mesh router connection to configure correctly.  This doesn’t have to be wired.  Wireless worked just fine for me.

Once all Sonos units have configured via the mesh router and are connected to the mesh wireless, moving them around the house and having them connect to the mesh via points or nodes works with no issue at all (so far) :-)

 

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Hi @Bluesden 

Thank you for sharing that - I’m sure someone will find it extremely helpful!

This was one of the most insightful posts I've ever read. Thank you. 

 

I'm running a large network with over 200 devices and lots of Sonos. Everything Sonos related is actually running fine, but something is creating some kind of wonkiness with other devices on the network. 

Ive been isolating different clients and when I powered up the Sonos it impacted the sync of a bunch of 2.4 GHz smart light switches. So this post really helped me better understand. 

 

Here's my topology, do you think there is anyway Sonos could create a switch loop? Is there anyway a wired speaker could accidentally be connected wirelessly at the same time? The Eero people think some type of hub or router is on my network that's changing IPs. 

 

 

 

​​​​​​Modem Bridge > Eero PRO6 > Unmanaged Dedicated Sonos Switch > (11Amps, 5 Arc, 4 Beams gen2, 2 Subs G3, 1 Sub G1, Playbar, and 2 Play 1s). All speakers are wired expect for the 2 play 1s. And one sub is wireless currently. 

Sonos is working great. But trying to figure out what's causing some other network instability when it's on. Let me know if anyone has any thoughts or experiments I should try? 

 

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Hi @WilsonLane 

The only way a device will not take whatever IP address the router decides it should get is if it has been manually configured to ask for a specific IP. Given that you can’t tell Sonos devices to do this, your Eero is entirely responsible for the IP addresses assigned to Sonos devices. As mentioned in some of the replies here, manual assignment of IP addresses in your network can make things more stable, but this would need to be done in your Eero configuration app/page.

Even though your Sonos system works well, it may be worth getting in touch with our technical support team, as diagnostics will be able to tell us if any devices on the network are being assigned IP addresses that Sonos is already using, or if there is any sign of multicast flooding on your network.

I hope this helps.

WilsonLane,

I recommend using a network scanner, such as FING. The scanner can help find duplicate IP addresses. I strongly recommend reserving IP addresses for all regular network clients. Note that the scan can only find current duplicates, not future duplicates created by devices that are presently offline.

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I had the same issue as you many years back and traced it to the unmanaged switch that all of the SONOS and other equipment was connected to that required STP / RSTP to be active. The system worked fine until certain devices were turned on and then a “Ethernet Broadcast Storm” occurred which caused the entire network (Wired and Wireless) to fail.

The solution was to have all of the wired SONOS products connected to a managed Ethernet Switch with proper STP / RSTP configuration.

My configuration is Xfinity XB7 Modem -- TP-LINK Managed Switch - Main Switch - TP-LINK Managed Switch - Home Office - TP-LINK Managed Switch - Living Room. I have most of my SONOS equipment connected to the three TP-LINK Managed Switches. The other SONOS devices are connected to the SONOS Net. In addition, I also have the latest generation XFINITY Pods to increase the wireless range of the Xfinity XB7 Modem. All of the network cable is CAT5E.

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Hi @WilsonLane 

The only way a device will not take whatever IP address the router decides it should get is if it has been manually configured to ask for a specific IP. Given that you can’t tell Sonos devices to do this, your Eero is entirely responsible for the IP addresses assigned to Sonos devices. As mentioned in some of the replies here, manual assignment of IP addresses in your network can make things more stable, but this would need to be done in your Eero configuration app/page.

Even though your Sonos system works well, it may be worth getting in touch with our technical support team, as diagnostics will be able to tell us if any devices on the network are being assigned IP addresses that Sonos is already using, or if there is any sign of multicast flooding on your network.

I hope this helps.

Hi all, first post here so please go gentle on me.

 

I have a handful of Sonos gear, Play:1s, 3s, 5s and a Connect:Amp running on S2.  All of my devices are running wireless, on their own ‘Sonos’ SSID.  They’re also running across 3 or 4 access points (TP-Link Omada), and all devices are fixed-DHCP on my router.

 

The wireless network is technically NOT a mesh setup, although two APs do mesh together (wireless connection from my office to my workshop), however all APs share the same WLAN configurations (SSIDs, security etc).  Protable devices like phones and tablets can switch from AP to AP without issue or user knowledge.  Aside from the occasionall weak wi-fi signal strength (the Connect:Amp is in my workshop, the AP is outside - metal walls not so good for wi-fi),  I’ve found the set up to be almost 100% stable.  Interestingly the Sonos devices connect to the wireless networks in a mixture of 2.4 & 5GHz.  I assuming this is dictated by the proximity to the AP.

 

As mentioned above, I’ve used the TP-Link Omada system: this makes the multiple APs within my wireless network ‘look like one’.  However, what it really does is:

     Easily configures all APs to have the same SSID, security

     Centralises control of your WLAN

     Makes adding/replacing/removing an AP easy

I think what you could do, if you have more than one AP (say, Router WLAN plus a second wired AP), is to simply replicate the SSID and security on the second AP.  I did this when one on of my Omada APs died and the SONOS gear kept working fine.  Maybe this was the SONOSNET bit doing its job, I’m not sure.  But at least on SONOS device cannot connect to any other SONOS device and this one kept working fine on the temporary AP.

Anyway, what I wanted to do was pass on an example of a multi-AP, multi-SSID WLAN across several buildings where SONOS devices, all wirelessly connected, are working quite well.  This is not to gloat, just to give someone who has some struggles confidence they’ll work it out.  I have been fortunate that I’ve not had significant challenges, but here’s an overview of my network configuration.  I hope it might be of benefit to you.

     Router - configured for Fixed DHCP for all usual devices (think phones, computers, SONOS                  devices etc)

     WLAN - SSID ‘Sonos”, SPA-Personal security (I don’t have neighbours close by)

     APs in service - 4

     SONOS devices - 7, shared across 3 or 4 APs as determined by WLAN management

     Two of the SONOS devices are operating ‘individually’, that is, they cannot possibly connect to             another SONOS device other than across ‘my networks’.

 

As above, I think the main points of my excessive post are go for Fixed DHCP on your router; these speakers don’t move so lock in their IP address, and if you’re running multiple APs, configure the same SSID across all of them.  Most APs will handle a couple of SSIDs at least, so this should be kinda straight forward to sort out.

 

Disclaimer - I don’t have/use propriety mesh systems like Google Mesh or Orbi etc.  What I’ve described may or may not be possible on these systems.

 

Good luck with your set up.  Reply if you like; if you have questions I’ll try to answer them.

Kind Regards.

You guys are all techies and can barely figure this out.  For the novice, we got no shot.  This product - many years later, is so far from plug and play.  In a wireless world, this product is terrible  

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Hi @Direwolf 

You guys are all techies and can barely figure this out.  For the novice, we got no shot.  This product - many years later, is so far from plug and play.  In a wireless world, this product is terrible  

For the majority of users, Sonos is plug-and-play, and works out of the box. However, Sonos systems (due to the nature of the task they perform) utilise their host network in a way that many other devices do not, and therefore can highlight issues not readily apparent from other use-cases. We are here to help, however, as is our fantastic community - if you are having trouble with a particular issue, please create a new thread at Ask A Question, and I’m sure you will get the help you need.

This forum is the closest I can find to the subject of my question, so I’ll post it here.

I have a dozen or so Sonos products including surround sound setup with Beam (2nd gen), a sub and two 3’s for rear speakers and various 1’s around the rest of the house. I installed a Google mesh system with the ISP’s cable going right into a Google node (no ISP router). Three other Google “nodes” around the house and all show strong signal and 80+Mbps speed.

However, occasionally a Sonos speaker will cut out or take its time coming online after being selected. One tech support person suggested a Sonos “Connect” may be helpful. I bought one but after reading this thread, I’m a bit afraid to try it and I’m tempted to leave well enough alone!

The question is: should I include the “connect” in the system and if so, how? Do I just plug the Connect into one of the Google nodes in the middle of the house? If so, which connection point on the node?

Thanks for any insights.

 

 

This forum is the closest I can find to the subject of my question, so I’ll post it here.

I have a dozen or so Sonos products including surround sound setup with Beam (2nd gen), a sub and two 3’s for rear speakers and various 1’s around the rest of the house. I installed a Google mesh system with the ISP’s cable going right into a Google node (no ISP router). Three other Google “nodes” around the house and all show strong signal and 80+Mbps speed.

However, occasionally a Sonos speaker will cut out or take its time coming online after being selected. One tech support person suggested a Sonos “Connect” may be helpful. I bought one but after reading this thread, I’m a bit afraid to try it and I’m tempted to leave well enough alone!

The question is: should I include the “connect” in the system and if so, how? Do I just plug the Connect into one of the Google nodes in the middle of the house? If so, which connection point on the node?

Thanks for any insights.

Firstly do you mean a Sonos ‘Boost’ rather than a ‘Connect’ - A ‘Connect’ is ‘usually’ used for connecting external audio sources to a Sonos system, like a Turntable or CD player etc?

Anyhow, perhaps have a read of this thread from Sonos Staff and first see if that assists you:

Sonos on WiFi Mesh

Yes! The “Boost”. My bad. Thanks for catching that.

Yes! The “Boost”. My bad. Thanks for catching that.

Ah that’s okay 👍 see if the linked thread assists - it’s basically a case of having your router in bridge mode. The Google Nest in router mode, with its satellite Hubs. Then wire just the Boost to the primary Nest/Router only (do not wire anything to the satellite hubs).

In the Sonos App ‘Settings/System/Networks’ area set the SonosNet channel to one that is not used by the Google WiFi. I would also remove your WiFi SSID/credentials from that area of the Sonos App too when you have all up and running.

Hope that assists.

Thanks, Ken. I will give it all a try when I’m feeling lucky! I appreciate the help!

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