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Vinyl and Analog Audio Questions

  • 27 November 2018
  • 13 replies
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I apologize if I'm asking questions that were already answered, as I have searched this forum and found some answers, but not all of them.

I currently have in my Family Room, the following setup: Playbar, Sub, and 2 Play 1s (so surround sound). If I was to purchase a turntable and want to hook it up to my Sonos, like this one (https://victrola.com/collections/record-player/products/victrola-6-in-1-nostalgic-bluetooth-record-player-with-3-speed-turntable), I understand I would need to also purchase a preamp and then either a Connect, Connect Amp, or Play 5 (only equipment that has audio in jacks).

Here is my first question: If I have zero interest in using the built in speaker with the turntable and only want to use my existing Sonos speakers to play the music, my assumption is go with the Connect over the Connect Amp? (since I don't need an amplifier). I know the purpose of the Connect is mainly to provide audio to your existing speakers, but it seems to be the cheapest option with the "audio in" port. I don't need the Play 5, sinceI already have great speaker coverage in the room.

Here is my second question: Would this be the setup. RCA Audio out jacks on the turntable to Preamp RCA in jacks. Preamp RCA out jacks to RCA in jacks on Sonos Connect?

Third Question: This is for a separate project. I recieved my uncle's "1960 stereo". It has a turntable built in as well as AM/FM and shortwave radio. On the back on the equipment are two outputs for external speakers (see photo).



It has DIN 41529 Right and Left inputs. Besides the preamp what other "converters" would I need if I wanted to hook this up to my Sonos? It's probably going to be an expensive project, but wanted to see what was involved.

Thank you so much for your help!
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Best answer by Airgetlam 27 November 2018, 16:59

First question: Yes, the CONNECT will provide an input without having an amp associated to power speakers.
Second question; Yes, you seem to know exactly what you're doing here :)
Third question: Aha, this is much more challenging. And confusing. What is it you want to connect to your Sonos? Do you want your Sonos to be powering the speakers in this device? Or do you want the output from those two speaker outputs to go into your Sonos?

Those speaker outputs are not at phono or even line level as you're dealing with in your previous two questions. They're completely variable, and controlled (I'm assuming) by some volume control on the front. This can (not must!) create issues for taking that as the line in to a CONNECT. So, if that's the case, you'd need some sort of cable that connects to that output, which is super hard to see on my monitor, and ends in RCA jacks. After connecting the two devices, I'd start testing it at somewhere below 10% of volume on that 1960 stereo, and fiddle more with the line-in settings in the Sonos controller. The issue you're trying to really avoid is over powering that input to the CONNECT. And then, once you've found the correct variable amount on both sides, you need to not mess with the volume control on the 1960 stereo at all. For what it's worth, I would not want to do this kind of setup at all. To much opportunity for loss of control.
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The Connect is correct for your needs.

If you wish for the output on the stereo system to play on Sonos, you would need two line output converters. These will convert the amplified speaker output to a line level signal for the Connect line-in.
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The Connect is correct for your needs.

If you wish for the output on the stereo system to play on Sonos, you would need two line output converters. These will convert the amplified speaker output to a line level signal for the Connect line-in.


Thank you for confirming the "Connect" is what I needed. Can you please let me know (I'm very much a layman/novice with these terms) what "two line output converters" are, or provide a link to a product? Would I also need to purchase a separate preamp as well? Thank you again so much for your response
First question: Yes, the CONNECT will provide an input without having an amp associated to power speakers.
Second question; Yes, you seem to know exactly what you're doing here :)
Third question: Aha, this is much more challenging. And confusing. What is it you want to connect to your Sonos? Do you want your Sonos to be powering the speakers in this device? Or do you want the output from those two speaker outputs to go into your Sonos?

Those speaker outputs are not at phono or even line level as you're dealing with in your previous two questions. They're completely variable, and controlled (I'm assuming) by some volume control on the front. This can (not must!) create issues for taking that as the line in to a CONNECT. So, if that's the case, you'd need some sort of cable that connects to that output, which is super hard to see on my monitor, and ends in RCA jacks. After connecting the two devices, I'd start testing it at somewhere below 10% of volume on that 1960 stereo, and fiddle more with the line-in settings in the Sonos controller. The issue you're trying to really avoid is over powering that input to the CONNECT. And then, once you've found the correct variable amount on both sides, you need to not mess with the volume control on the 1960 stereo at all. For what it's worth, I would not want to do this kind of setup at all. To much opportunity for loss of control.
They are mostly used for car stereo applications, but they can also be for home use.

Here's a link:

https://www.amazon.com/PAC-SNI-35-Variable-Line-Converter/dp/B001EAWS3W/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1543334218&sr=8-4&keywords=line+output+converter

Basically, you plug the speaker wire side into the L/R speaker outputs, and the RCA analogs into the Line-in for the Connect.
Ah, a much better solution to mine, thanks, jgatie!
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First question: Yes, the CONNECT will provide an input without having an amp associated to power speakers.
Second question; Yes, you seem to know exactly what you're doing here :)
Third question: Aha, this is much more challenging. And confusing. What is it you want to connect to your Sonos? Do you want your Sonos to be powering the speakers in this device? Or do you want the output from those two speaker outputs to go into your Sonos?

Those speaker outputs are not at phono or even line level as you're dealing with in your previous two questions. They're completely variable, and controlled (I'm assuming) by some volume control on the front. This can (not must!) create issues for taking that as the line in to a CONNECT. So, if that's the case, you'd need some sort of cable that connects to that output, which is super hard to see on my monitor, and ends in RCA jacks. After connecting the two devices, I'd start testing it at somewhere below 10% of volume on that 1960 stereo, and fiddle more with the line-in settings in the Sonos controller. The issue you're trying to really avoid is over powering that input to the CONNECT. And then, once you've found the correct variable amount on both sides, you need to not mess with the volume control on the 1960 stereo at all. For what it's worth, I would not want to do this kind of setup at all. To much opportunity for loss of control.


Thank you very much for the very detailed response, I truly appreciate it. Thank you for confirming my assumption that the "Connect" is what I needed (wish it wasn't so expensive) and that the setup with the preamp to the Connect is correct.

Thank you also for your input on the 1960s stereo. It does seem like a lot of trouble. My desire was to use the the Sonos Speakers only (the 1960s stereo is currently in the same room as a "conversation piece"). Basically I thought it would be cool to turn it on and have the audio output on my Sonos system instead of the Stereo itself. But perhaps it isn't worth the trouble!
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They are mostly used for car stereo applications, but they can also be for home use.

Here's a link:

https://www.amazon.com/PAC-SNI-35-Variable-Line-Converter/dp/B001EAWS3W/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1543334218&sr=8-4&keywords=line+output+converter

Basically, you plug the speaker wire side into the L/R speaker outputs, and the RCA analogs into the Line-in for the Connect.


Oh wow, that's pretty cool (and cheap!) Thank you . I don't know much about those input ports, would I need to solder? Would I need to go into the preamp from the Line Out Converter or is that not needed in this case? Also, would the audio still play on the 1960s stereo or just my Sonos system? Thanks and sorry for all the silly dumb questions!


Oh wow, that's pretty cool (and cheap!) Thank you . I don't know much about those input ports, would I need to solder? Would I need to go into the preamp from the Line Out Converter or is that not needed in this case? Also, would the audio still play on the 1960s stereo or just my Sonos system? Thanks and sorry for all the silly dumb questions!


The speaker outputs look to be spring loaded, so you just put the bare end of the wire in. Not sure if there are internal speakers on the stereo, if there are, they will play. However, the output to Sonos will suffer a 70ms delay due to buffering.
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The speaker outputs look to be spring loaded, so you just put the bare end of the wire in. Not sure if there are internal speakers on the stereo, if there are, they will play. However, the output to Sonos will suffer a 70ms delay due to buffering.


Awesome, thank you!

Last question, I promise for my setup in original question 1/2, if that new turntable also has a built-in internal speaker, will music also play from there as well when connected to the Sonos Connect? If I turn down the built-in volume to "0", will it still play out of my Sonos speakers?
The line out should not be affected by the volume control of the internal speakers.
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Thanks again @jagatie and @Airgetlam for your great help!
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Is there a reason you want that particular turntable, or do you already have it? There are many turntables with built in preamps that would sound much better, unless your goal is to also use the bluetooth function as well to add bluetooth to your Sonos ecosystem.
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Is there a reason you want that particular turntable, or do you already have it? There are many turntables with built in preamps that would sound much better, unless your goal is to also use the bluetooth function as well to add bluetooth to your Sonos ecosystem. I guess it was because it also had a CD player, and figured I can kill too birds with one stone. If you can recommend a better turntable, I'm all ears. Thank you. Again, I'm a complete novice here