Starting from Zero

  • 29 November 2022
  • 18 replies
  • 199 views

ok, so i’m starting from zero. Going to buy a cd player and receiver, and i want to be able to stream music.

My question is this: Do i need to buy a certain type of cd player and receiver so that i can then hook up a Sonos speaker? And do i need to buy bookshelf speakers as well, or will the Sonos speakers be enough?

I’m looking at a Sonos port and a couple of the SL speakers.


18 replies

Why do you need a CD player if you will be streaming music? 

Also, you may not need a receiver. If your goal is to play CD’s and stream music, a single or pair of SONOS FIVE’s will do the job. You can plug the output from any CD player into a FIVE. If you have additional SONOS players the music can play in any combination of players.

Why do you need a CD player if you will be streaming music? 

Also, you many not need a receiver. If your goal is to play CD’s and stream music, a single or pair of SONOS FIVE’s will do the job. You can plug the output from any CD player into a FIVE. If you have additional SONOS players the music can play in any combination of players.

I wanna stream, play cds, and also listen to the radio.

I wanna be able to stream, play cds, and listen to the radio as well.

I wanna be able to stream, play cds, and listen to the radio as well.

 

99% of the radio stations on the air can be streamed via TuneIn or other services.  CD’s can be ripped and played from your library.  When I got Sonos, I connected my CD player to my ZP80.  After I saw how easy it was to stream, I used the CD player exactly zero times.  And that was in 2008, before most streaming services were around.  

Hi. If you think you need a CD player and receiver, and Sonos speakers for that receiver, you haven't done any research into Sonos. I think you should read the basic info on the Sonos.site.

I did read, and it seems like Sonos would be a good way to listen as opposed to Bluetooth or bookshelf speakers. I'm here trying to find this stuff out.

OK here are a couple of key features of Sonos:

1.it isn't designed to be used with physical media like CDs. It plays music files. You could rip your CDs or just stream. 

2. Sonos speakers are amplified speakers  They cannot be used with a receiver and don't need a receiver. 

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But if you like playing your CD's, Sonos has two devices that can bring the CD-sound into the Sonos universe: the Five and the Port. Both have an analogue in that can be connected to the CD-player.

Though streaming from TuneIn, Spotify etc. is fine, I like to (have the possibility to) play my CD's too. For this I use the Connect (Gen 2), predecessor to the Port.

The beauty of Sonos is that you can start small and build up over time.  I would begin with a Sonos One and see how you get on with it.  You can stream radio and services like Spotify and Amazon Music (given a suitable subscription).  If you are sure you want to play physical CDs (and that’s a perfectly valid preference), then go for a Five, as that has an analog line in to which you could attach a CD player.

Btw, Most Sonos speakers do NOT do Bluetooth.  Both the speakers I mentioned are Airplay 2 compatible (although only useful for Apple devices, obviously).

I wanna be able to stream, play cds, and listen to the radio as well.

Sonos can deliver the functionality of the latter two, by being able to do the first part. A good way to start is to get one Sonos One SL, and play with it so you get to know what it can do, and what it cannot if you really need more than what it can do. That will then leave you in a better place to decide next steps.

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There are alternatives.... I use a usb CD player (25 euro} to play cds to my Sonos speakers via Logitech Media Server. 

 

But if you like playing your CD's, Sonos has two devices that can bring the CD-sound into the Sonos universe: the Five and the Port. Both have an analogue in that can be connected to the CD-player.

Though streaming from TuneIn, Spotify etc. is fine, I like to (have the possibility to) play my CD's too. For this I use the Connect (Gen 2), predecessor to the Port.

Definitely going with the Port, but going to do some research into Connect. I appreciate it, thanks! 

The beauty of Sonos is that you can start small and build up over time.  I would begin with a Sonos One and see how you get on with it.  You can stream radio and services like Spotify and Amazon Music (given a suitable subscription).  If you are sure you want to play physical CDs (and that’s a perfectly valid preference), then go for a Five, as that has an analog line in to which you could attach a CD player.

Definitely going for Sonos One to start. Assumed I was going with a port for receiver and cd player but I’ll look into the Five. I’ve had that recommended before. Thanks! 

I wanna be able to stream, play cds, and listen to the radio as well.

Sonos can deliver the functionality of the latter two, by being able to do the first part. A good way to start is to get one Sonos One SL, and play with it so you get to know what it can do, and what it cannot if you really need more than what it can do. That will then leave you in a better place to decide next steps.

will do, thanks!

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@jmac99 Since you're just starting make sure you buy a Connect Gen 2 (built, I think, from 2016 on) that can work with the newer Sonos app (the brown one, S2).

I wanna be able to stream, play cds, and listen to the radio as well.

 

99% of the radio stations on the air can be streamed via TuneIn or other services.  CD’s can be ripped and played from your library.  When I got Sonos, I connected my CD player to my ZP80.  After I saw how easy it was to stream, I used the CD player exactly zero times.  And that was in 2008, before most streaming services were around.  

I agree.

The only disadvantages of listening to a radio station through an online service or directly through a radio receiver is that the online services might insert some commercials and sometimes sports games are broadcast on a local station, but are not available online.

With respect to CD players, most people that I know who connected a CD player to a new SONOS system “kicked the tires” on day one to make sure that the CD player worked, but never used it again. In some social circles friends travel around with CD’s and it might be convenient to be able to play CD’s that show up in someone’s pocket. However, most online services allow you to share playlists with friends. This would be equivalent to carrying a warehouse of CD’s in the pocket. Plus, switching CD’s and tracks is almost instant with an online service or hard drive storage.

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I appreciate the way everyone supports the experienced and inexperienced user.  I myself have owned a PC since 1984, and I’m still trying to wrap my head around the newer medium connections.  Yes, you would put me in the classification of “old school”.
I can appreciate the CD users…. I am one myself, but find I have my music contained in multiple mediums, due to purchasing it over the last three to four decades.
Sonos on my friends ….

 

 

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