Ideal setup if line-in is needed?


I am trying to figure out a design that will work with primarily using line in for a turntable and music stored locally on my phone (occasional Spotify streaming too). I am new to the Sonos ecosystem and some things are still a bit opaque to me.

For Sonos products that offer line in, I see there is the Amp, the Five, or discontinued Connect. I'm not sure what purpose the amp would serve for line-in though, since the Five also offers line in, is cheaper than the amp, AND is a speaker.

Here is what I'm thinking for the setup: 1x Five (instead of the Amp), a pair of Ones, and the sub, and have this all be one group. May add a beam for the TV at some point. I'd likely get a $50 stereo mixer and have that go line-in to the Five. Phone with local files, turntable, maybe my DJ mixer, would all be connected to the stereo mixer that goes into the Five.

Does that sound like an ideal setup or are there other things that I'm not considering? Listening environment is: Massive downstairs area, with kitchen, large living room and bonus room (all open space).

 

EDIT: Just a note, the other alternative I’m thinking is: Amp (that my local phone files/turntable is connected to), pair of Ones, sub. This doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense to me though, because it would cost about the same us the setup I mentioned above.


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Take a look at the Sonos Port option too: https://www.sonos.com/en-us/shop/port.html

Userlevel 7
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You missed the Port, to which you can connect a turntable and that would send the sound to other Sonos devices. The Port is a bit cheaper than the Five, but does not have a speaker.

From what I have read on this forum people do not like touse Sonos for DJ-ing because Sonos adds 70ms delay to the sound needed for buffering.

 

You’re right, I did miss the Port. Looks about $200 cheaper than the amp. Would there be any benefit to getting the Port/Amp over a Five though if I only plan to use a turntable or phone with local FLAC saved to it? I would not be connecting anything other than Sonos speakers to the system (nothing third party).

Could you also let me know if a Five, 2 Ones and a Sub would be overkill for the space I described?

Good to know about the delay for DJing. This isn’t a must for me, so no biggie.

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The main benefit of an Amp is if you have passive, third-party bookshelf speakers you would like to use with your Sonos ecosystem… but you don’t, so the Amp isn’t necessary.

The benefits of the Port are it is the least expensive and has the smallest footprint out of the three options. But it doesn’t have a speaker like the Five does.

Whether or not the setup is “overkill” depends on the size of your room. How large is your space?

Whether or not the setup is “overkill” depends on the size of your room. How large is your space?

Its a pretty large space. Open concept kitchen, living room, bonus room. Total dimensions of the space are 42 feet by 15 feet. Space is tall too, about 9 feet. Overall would be thinking Sub + 2x Ones + 1x Five.

Userlevel 7
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Whether or not the setup is “overkill” depends on the size of your room. How large is your space?

Its a pretty large space. Open concept kitchen, living room, bonus room. Total dimensions of the space are 42 feet by 15 feet. Space is tall too, about 9 feet. Overall would be thinking Sub + 2x Ones + 1x Five.

It think that setup would sound great in that large space.

One more note… if your turntable doesn’t have a phono preamp, you would have to add one to your setup with the Port or Five. https://support.sonos.com/s/article/3548?language=en_US

Awesome! My turntable has a preamp, so all set there.

One thing that’s also not completely clear to me is how the setup I described would be setup stereo-wise. I know the Five can either be mono (if you have two Fives) or stereo. Would I essentially setup the Five as the main speaker in the group, then the two Ones as satellites? Or are there a bunch of options to choose from in the app? I am trying to thinking about how the stereo separation would work with a setup like this.

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You would create two zones - one zone for your Five/turntable and one zone for your two Ones. Since you have only one Five, you will keep it in the horizontal orientation for better stereo separation. You will pair the two Ones as a stereo pair. You then have to decide to connect the Sub to either the Five or the pair of Ones. I would try both to see which sounds the best. This setup will give you the option to listen to either zone separately or “group” both zones together to play the same music out of all of your speakers.

Are you planning on keeping the Five and two Ones together or at two different locations in the room?

 

In the future, if you decide to add the Sonos Beam or Sonos Arc for your TV, you could use the two Ones as rear surround speakers and connect the Sub to the sound bar to have a 5.1 (Beam) or 5.1.2 (Arc) home theater setup.

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Just for clarification: "zones” in Sonos speak are called "rooms". Each room is a speaker or a standard set of (surround or stereo) speakers. Foor stereo you can only pair two of the same speakers in one room (One and OIne SL count as the same). Foor surround you need a soundbar.

This is all very helpful. Thanks everyone. I was supposed to be working today, but I have gotten completely sucked into the Sonos rabbithole:smile:

Here’s what I’m thinking for a final setup:

Zone 1: Five with my turntable connected to it

Zone 2: Pair of Ones with the Sub

The Five and Ones/Sub would be in two different locations. The Five would be in the bonus room area, and the Ones/Sub would be in the living room area.

If I am understanding correctly, I can play either Zone 1 or Zone 2 separately, or both of the Zones 1 and 2 together without any latency or them being out of sync or anything?

Rough layout:

 

Userlevel 7
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I think that layout will work great.
 

If I am understanding correctly, I can play either Zone 1 or Zone 2 separately, or both of the Zones 1 and 2 together without any latency or anything?


Yes, you can play each zone separately or both zones together with no latency issues.

I recommend keeping the SUB closer to the speaker(s) that it supports. It is true that it can be difficult for a blindfolded human to walk into a room and point to the exact subwoofer location, but if you separate the subwoofer as much as you propose, you may become aware of the separation and it may seem uncomfortable.

Also keep in mind that sound is pokey, traveling at about one foot per millisecond. If sub is too far from it’s speakers it may seem out of sync. Your room is large enough that sync may become an issue -- depending on your sensitivity and location relative to the speakers.

Everyone’s sensitivity to these sorts of issues varies. You can try your setup and see if anything matters. If it does not matter, celebrate. If it matters, you are on a long journey of pursuing the perfect sound. I know a woman who would notice your proposed subwoofer separation in a few seconds and complain. (and she knows virtually nothing about how sound propagates) I know a guy who is a bass freak and (at my suggestion) has his SUB placed in a far corner (SUB is most efficient on the floor in a corner) and turns the bass to max. In my opinion his is a gross sounding system because it is easy to locate SUB and the bass thump is overwhelming, but he loves his system. Only you know what sounds “best”.
 

I recommend keeping the SUB closer to the speaker(s) that it supports.

I agree; I would go so far as to say that the Sub should be between the two One units that it is bonded to. Bass frequencies are passed to the Sub at around 95Hz; and what is said about origin of low frequency sound not being located usually applies to frequencies below 80Hz. So for proper music integration I could never live with Sonos Sub as in the diagram.

Of course, as said in the post above, try for yourself and consider yourself lucky if the off to one side placement works for you.

That placement may work for movies where the Sub only does the low frequency effects channel. 

I recommend keeping the SUB closer to the speaker(s) that it supports.

I agree; I would go so far as to say that the Sub should be between the two One units that it is bonded to. Bass frequencies are passed to the Sub at around 95Hz; and what is said about origin of low frequency sound not being located usually applies to frequencies below 80Hz. So for proper music integration I could never live with Sonos Sub as in the diagram.

Of course, as said in the post above, try for yourself and consider yourself lucky if the off to one side placement works for you.

That placement may work for movies where the Sub only does the low frequency effects channel. 

 

Yeah, great recommendation. Ideally I’d have the sub in the middle, but due to the furniture layout in the room, this is the best compromise I could make without upsetting my spouse. The picture is a bit inaccurate too, it’s not as offset and separated as drawn.

Reporting back though, everything sounds great. There’s a small bit of separation but it’s nothing really noticeable unless I’m specifically looking for it. I actually ended up moving the Five into the living room area along with everything else and it filled in the sound very nicely. I was afraid that the Five would muddy up the Sub (not sure what the crossover frequency is for that) but it all sounds great together. Swimming in bass that feels nice and liquidy throughout the whole space. No dead spots or weird reflections or anything.

The only thing at this point that I can foresee adding is a few Ones in the adjacent dining room and another Five upstairs so that no one can escape the music, muah ha ha ha.

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