Sonos Play 1 component identification

  • 27 February 2024
  • 7 replies
  • 55 views

I have a Sonos Play 1 which is missing resistor R526 from the main board (don’t ask!)  I need to know the value of his single resistor to restore the speaker to working condition, which I’d very  much like to do. Does anyone at Sonos have access to the schematics? (Someone must have!) If so, determining the correct value of this resistor should be an easy task, and would not violate any trade secrets.  Alternatively, does anyone have a main board on which they could use an ohm meter to actually measure the value in circuit? Any help with my mission would be greatly appreciated!!  Thank you!

Corry P 2 months ago

Hi @Curious George 

Welcome to the Sonos Community!

Opening any electronic device that has an internal power supply carries with it a risk of death - we can only recommend that you do not do so. As a result, the information you request is not available, nor would I be permitted to share it if it were - but not for trade secret reasons!

The community at large may be able to help, however - my replying here will get your post back on top of the “recently active” list of topics.

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7 replies

Userlevel 7
Badge +18

Hi @Curious George 

Welcome to the Sonos Community!

Opening any electronic device that has an internal power supply carries with it a risk of death - we can only recommend that you do not do so. As a result, the information you request is not available, nor would I be permitted to share it if it were - but not for trade secret reasons!

The community at large may be able to help, however - my replying here will get your post back on top of the “recently active” list of topics.

Hi Corry,

Thanks for your fast acknowledgement and response to my inquiry, even if it’s not the response I was hoping for!  Sonos’s concern for my well-being is appreciated although unnecessary in my case as I’ve been designing, building, and repairing electronic devices safely since the days of vacuum tubes 🙂

I hope a member of the community will be in a position to provide the information I need and help save a perfectly repairable device from the land-fill.

Userlevel 7
Badge +18

Hi @Curious George 

I appreciate that anyone asking such a question is probably qualified to avoid risk, but there is the unavoidable question of liability - I assume it’s safer just to say no than to risk it.

A thought - it may be worth looking for a non-functional Play:1 on eBay (or similar). Use it for reference (and perhaps the spare part), then sell it again for the next person looking for answers/parts like yourself. Over here in the UK, I found one for £22 ($28) in seconds. 

I hope this helps.

 

Edit: Wait a while to see if anyone just gives you the answer here, of course.

Userlevel 7
Badge +22

Hi Corry,

Thanks for your fast acknowledgement and response to my inquiry, even if it’s not the response I was hoping for!  Sonos’s concern for my well-being is appreciated although unnecessary in my case as I’ve been designing, building, and repairing electronic devices safely since the days of vacuum tubes 🙂

Corry would likely end up unemployed if he shared that info, the Sonos legal team is not going to let Sonos end up on the wrong end of a legal action. Understandable in our current justice system.

There are other Sonos (not the company, just users) forums around, one of them might have the info.

Thanks for the insight and tip, Stanley.  I understand Corry has to tow the company line and I do appreciate that he quickly let me know their position.  I’m not sure if you’re in the USA or not, but over here there’s a growing ‘right to repair’ movement that has had some success in forcing manufacturers to make data (and parts) available to owners of their products that wish to perform their own repairs.  I’m not here to make a personal crusade out of my little problem, but I do enjoy bringing dead products back to life when I can😊

Userlevel 7
Badge +18

Hi @Curious George 

That’s a very good point about right to repair, but as far as I am aware, that movement largely relates to electronic devices that run off of batteries, like phones, or those with external power packs, like laptops. I don’t think there will be any companies releasing repair instructions for devices that convert AC to DC inside their housings - it’s just too dangerous. (#notalawyer)

I do find it laudable that you are attempting to resurrect a non-functional speaker, but we just can’t get involved.

Right to repair is an area that is constantly in flux. The latest SONOS products, such as the Era’s, use less glue and more screws, thus making disassembly, repair, and reassembly less destructive.

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