Love & hate with trueplay

  • 15 November 2023
  • 2 replies
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More hate then love at this point… I find it really unreliable and inconsistent. It gives me different results every time I run it. And even different results with different devices (I have an iPhone 12, an old iPhone 6s and an iPad).

I have the beam 2, sub mini and ones as rears. With 4 speakers and Atmos audio some kind of calibration is really needed. More speakers = more things that can go wrong with timing and eq issues.

The goal of Trueplay is to neutralise the influence of the room and give you the most standard sound. But what standard are we talking about if every time is different? How can it be trusted?

After doing Trueplay I use some sound tests to check what’s happened and more often then not some further adjustment is needed.

And it’s also buggy: why rears speaker distance is set to maximum distance while it’s not true? It introduces audible delay that you can notice with an appropriate test.

I’m thinking of ditching it totally, and I would do it if manual control would be more complete, at least with an eq with some more frequencies and more granular delay settings. But manual control is not there, so I still need Trueplay.

What’s your opinion about trueplay? Do you like it? Do you use it?


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2 replies

I’m ambivalent about it. To me, it’s more of a marketing check box. There are some rooms that I’ve used it in, there are others that it’s made no difference, so I leave it off. 

If it were a true ‘requirement’, I would expect that Sonos would figure out a way to make it work on Android devices. Given that they don’t, it reduces its importance, in my book.

And there is no engineer in the world who knows the way I want to hear sound. Where I do use it, it’s merely a baseline that I  then adjust to match my desired sound ‘profile’.

I am more pleased with the process on newer speakers that have their own microphones to do ‘self’ TruePlay. That seems much more useful. 

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And there is no engineer in the world who knows the way I want to hear sound. Where I do use it, it’s merely a baseline that I  then adjust to match my desired sound ‘profile’.

 

Yes it’s personal taste but should be also standard. Software correction or other forms of calibration is widely used in recording studios or cinema rooms to obtain a standard sound you can trust. Trueplay should do that, and after you can do some “personal” correction to meet your taste, but from my experience Trueplay is very far from giving a standard sound.