Power consumption?

  • 3 January 2017
  • 17 replies
  • 12312 views

I want to know what the normal and maximum power consumption is for PLAY1, PLAY5, PLAYBAR and SUB when I play? Not when idle. Can´t find that in any specs on sonos.com (the minimum is stated for some of them ex. PLAY1 appr 4w) I need to know this because I have limited power in my apartment. It is not important that your answer is exactly 🙂

17 replies

Userlevel 7
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Afraid I cannot help

Not particularly convinced that in 2017 you are limited in power in your apartment to the extent that you'd have to worry about the power consumption of a speaker. I do hope you don't have any 100W light bulbs!
Userlevel 1
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Depends on the volume and US or EU etc I believe
A quick call to support will answer your query.
TVs use a lot of power v SONOS
http://www.frequencycast.co.uk/howmanywatts.html
So if you are okay with your TV I'm sure you'll be pleasantly surprised by SONOS maximum power consumption
Did anybody solve this? I too found the idle power consumption (https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/260/~/sonos-power-consumption-when-idle), but who cares about that, what's the maximum power consumption? This should definition be a published specification as with any electronic device. Very disappointed I can't find this anywhere.
Did anybody solve this? I too found the idle power consumption (https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/260/~/sonos-power-consumption-when-idle), but who cares about that, what's the maximum power consumption? This should definition be a published specification as with any electronic device. Very disappointed I can't find this anywhere.

Grab a speaker and look at the label, it details the voltage and maximum power consumption in Amps.
Great, but don't have one available right now, so why isn't this published information?
At what volume and voltage... hard to calculate.

The Play 1 is rated at 1 Amp but if it drew that at maximum voume it would be very hot.
It doesn't say what it's maximum consumption in watts is?

Voltage would be European standard 230v.
Userlevel 7
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Go to ebay.com and search on the model sonos you want the power use for. Check the photos there and you'll find a listing that shows the power label with a few tries. Just found a play 1 listed at 1 amp for 100-240 volts.

The maximum power number is pretty useless, it is likely the start-up surge current, not the playing current. If you really care grab a Kill-A-Watt meter or something similar and test the ones you are interested in.
Good call Stanley. I found the Play 5 gen 1 is rated at 2 amps. I am guessing the gen 2 is not much different if at all and probably nothing, except maybe the subwoofer, would draw more than the play 5.

Does anyone have a sub that can say?
Userlevel 7
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Dug out my Kill-A-Watt EZ and my Gen 1 Play 5, these numbers are at 120 volts.

Idle: Watt 5.1, VA 14.1, PF .35 (Not far from the Sonos 6.9 watt spec)

Playing moderate volume: Watt 10.7, VA 23.3, PF .45 (testing loud playing not an available option per the wife)

I wonder how many years it would take to pay-back for an upgrade to the 2.1 Watt Gen 2?

I'm going to look at my Play 3s and ZP-80s power use at some point too just out of curiosity. May even be able to try them loud if I pick a good time. 🙂
Dug out my Kill-A-Watt EZ and my Gen 1 Play 5, these numbers are at 120 volts.

Idle: Watt 5.1, VA 14.1, PF .35 (Not far from the Sonos 6.9 watt spec)

Playing moderate volume: Watt 10.7, VA 23.3, PF .45 (testing loud playing not an available option per the wife)

I wonder how many years it would take to pay-back for an upgrade to the 2.1 Watt Gen 2?

I'm going to look at my Play 3s and ZP-80s power use at some point too just out of curiosity. May even be able to try them loud if I pick a good time. :-)


Thanks for the info.
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Grab a speaker and look at the label, it details the voltage and maximum power consumption in Amps.

NOT a Beam 🙂
Userlevel 7
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The maximum power is pretty much meaningless except when making sure your circuit can support the surge draw after a power outage ends and everything powers back up at once.


https://support.sonos.com/s/article/256?language=en_US

Beam up to 5.3 Watts
This becomes question becomes relevant to those of us installing a speaker within the power supply parameters of a boat, RV or Camper...
So what is the raw power supply to the play 5 after the 110/240v transformer?
So what is the raw power supply to the play 5 after the 110/240v transformer?

This information will not be available to us, and it is not very useful, other than when crowing about circuit efficiency or power factor management. These units use switchmode power supplies and the amplifiers are also switchmode. Efficiency will vary with the load (the instantaneous Volume) as will the power factor. You are most interested in the final load presented to your power system through the unit's power cord.

Music is mostly a series of peaks and bass notes require more energy than high frequencies. A thundering bass line for a rock-n-roll track or the cannon shots of the 1812 Overture will be more taxing when you listen at high levels. Classical music it usually more dynamic than rock-n-roll. Radio broadcasts will be the least dynamic.

I would avoid trying to design too close to the limit of your power supply. For example, if you design the power system assuming that the amplifier will average only 20% of the max and you are listening to the 1812 late at night with all of the lights running, that cannon boom could push over the limit. And, hot summer weather will present a different challenge if you have air conditioning. Motors and modern lighting can present interesting power factor management issues, simple incandescent lamps lamps are docile because they present a power factor of 1.0. Dimmers and speed controls can muck with the power factor.
Userlevel 7
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About the only option you have to find the actual power draw is to plug the speaker you are interested in into a good power meter and listen to an hour of your music at your usual volume level. Go to the meter and find peak watts and total watt hours, with the two you can design what you need to support it.

Having lived in an RV for a bit over 10 years using solar/battery power and a small emergency generator I'd be looking elsewhere for a music system. We spent a lot of time and effort reducing unwanted power draws that were a tiny fraction of the Sonos idle power. If you are going to be living plugged in or with a generator running then the Sonos power draw is minor and I'd ignore it. Seriously, it is small change, even just the clock in a GE microwave draws over 20 watts! The counter light 80 more.

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