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Using a travel router (or "normal" router") on a wired only LAN to connect to Sonos

  • 5 March 2017
  • 5 replies
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Hi,

I have a shared Wi-Fi (where you log in with through an log in splash screen on the browser, not typing in a password) and wired only LAN. I can't use the the Wi-FI, because it's shared and I don't want anyone to be able to control the Sonos and I can't make the Sonos log on the Wi-Fi because of the browser login function).
So I have to use the wired LAN, but I need WiFi to control the Sonos from my phone.

In threads where people are asking for password protection for their Sonos, they are suggested to use a travel router, so they have their own wi-fi.
Can I use the travel router solution for this and plug it to the wired LAN? Or can travel routers only attach them selves to a Wifi? If so would a "normal" router that can make its own wifi work? (it's first time I hear the term travel router, so I actually don't if a travel router just is a "normal" router but smaller".
Bonus info: In my situation I have to use a Sonos Boost (I have 16 SONOS:1s) and that have to be wired to the (travel) router that makes the Wi-Fi.

Can anyone answer this?

Best

Jost L. Hansen
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Best answer by ratty 5 March 2017, 16:41

You don't need a travel router as such, just a conventional wireless router, especially with a larger number of client devices. For example a Netgear R6220 would do the job.

Many routers will detect that their WAN connection is onto a private network and adopt a suitable network prefix for their own LAN. If not you'll need to specify a network prefix which differs from the outer network. For example use 192.168.2.x if the main network is 192.168.1.x.
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5 replies

You don't need a travel router as such, just a conventional wireless router, especially with a larger number of client devices. For example a Netgear R6220 would do the job.

Many routers will detect that their WAN connection is onto a private network and adopt a suitable network prefix for their own LAN. If not you'll need to specify a network prefix which differs from the outer network. For example use 192.168.2.x if the main network is 192.168.1.x.
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Thanks. I'll get a conventional wireless router then 🙂
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Hi ratty,

I think I've run into this problem:
"Many routers will detect that their WAN connection is onto a private network and adopt a suitable network prefix for their own LAN. If not you'll need to specify a network prefix which differs from the outer network. For example use 192.168.2.x if the main network is 192.168.1.x."


I've got this router: http://www.linksys.com/us/support-product?pid=01t80000003KOkNAAW#Installation
And I can connect to the Internet and all.
I plug my Boost into the router. I log on to the net made by the router on my phone and run the installation in the Sonos app. But I can't make the light go green. It stays constant white.
I've tested the Boost at home using another router, and it works. Do you know if it's because of the above mentioned? If so, do you know how to solve it? I'm not sure I know how to use 192.168.2.x.

Best

Jost
You don't need to re-install/add any Sonos units. No need for any green flashing LEDs.

Just wire the BOOST to the WRT54GL. Connect the phone to the WRT's WiFi. Power cycle everything attached to that router. It should all just work.

If you find you can't connect out to the Internet (though you said you could?) then come back.

By the way, the standard firmware on those WRTs is not that great. I'd recommend you install Tomato firmware instead.
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I made it work and then I had to use a whole other solution. But it works now :-)
Thanks for the help.