SonosNet vs Orbi - Read My details


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I have a Netgear Orbi system running with 3 Orbis places strategically around my house. When I test my WiFi it’s always around 120 MBPS download and 20-25MBPS upload.

Would it make sense to buy a Sonos Boost and change the Sonos speakers into a mesh network being that I already have such a high rate of data transfer.

I have 7 sono’s One’s scattered around the house and a Sonos Beam and subwoofer (which I don’t know if the sub woofer ends up being part of the mesh in sonosnet)

Would Sonosnet mesh even be able to compete with the speeds of the Orbi?

Would having a dedicated mesh really be helpful being that I already have a mesh.

Would it effect performance in any way?

Or would I spend $99 for nothing , or even maybe lessened performance than I’m getting now?

My Orbi is just used for Hulu and iPhone browsing..so I’m not really doing anything that requires the power I even have already.

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SonosNet doesn’t need to be as fast as your Orbi network, as it’s not carrying video. Yes, it makes sense to get your Sonos devices on their own mesh. 7 Sonos devices will make a robust SonosNet mesh. It’s flawless when set up correctly, and streaming videos throughout the house on your Orbi network won’t affect it at all, assuming your internet speed is fast enough. Just be sure to set it up on a different channel.
lovewillrule1023,

Yes, I completely agree with Chicks post too ... I would run your Sonos system on it’s own in-built SonosNet mesh network. Note you don’t necessarily have to buy a Boost, you can just cable a nearby speaker to your main Orbi hub and that will initiate the SonosNet mesh network. You only need the Boost if one of your speakers are not near enough to cable.

This link is worth a read before you make your move...

Switching a Sonos Household between Standard & BOOST mode & vice versa

If you do decide to switchover to SonosNet, try to use a SonosNet channel that is at least 5 channels 'apart'for your Orbi 2.4ghz WiFi signal. I would also fix your Orbi WiFi channels. If you leave them set to auto, the Orbi channels 'may' change from time to time.

When your Sonos devices are working on SonosNet, I would also recommend you go to 'Advanced Settings/Wireless Setup' in the Sonos App and reset/remove your stored WiFi credentials, these are not usually needed when running your devices on SonosNet.

One final worthwhile thing to do for 'extra stability' for your system, is to add the IP addresses of all your Sonos devices to your Orbi DHCP Reservation Table, so they are assigned the same IP address whenever your Sonos devices or Orbi system is restarted.
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lovewillrule1023,

Yes, I completely agree with Chicks post too ... I would run your Sonos system on it’s own in-built SonosNet mesh network. Note you don’t necessarily have to buy a Boost, you can just cable a nearby speaker to your main Orbi hub and that will initiate the SonosNet mesh network. You only need the Boost if one of your speakers are not near enough to cable.

This link is worth a read before you make your move...

Switching a Sonos Household between Standard & BOOST mode & vice versa

If you do decide to switchover to SonosNet, try to use a SonosNet channel that is at least 5 channels 'apart'for your Orbi 2.4ghz WiFi signal. I would also fix your Orbi WiFi channels. If you leave them set to auto, the Orbi channels 'may' change from time to time.

When your Sonos devices are working on SonosNet, I would also recommend you go to 'Advanced Settings/Wireless Setup' in the Sonos App and reset/remove your stored WiFi credentials, these are not usually needed when running your devices on SonosNet.

One final worthwhile thing to do for 'extra stability' for your system, is to add the IP addresses of all your Sonos devices to your Orbi DHCP Reservation Table, so they are assigned the same IP address whenever your Sonos devices or Orbi system is restarted.
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Why would I add identical IP addresses of all Sonos devices to my Orbi DHCP Reservation Table?
I think you misread my post, or in fairness, I should say perhaps my post was not clear.

I was attempting to explain that by adding all the Sonos devices to your DHCP Reservation Table, they would then get their 'allocated' IP address each time... so it’s their own individual and unique IP address, but the IP same address is always allocated to the same device, all the time.

I hope that clarifies what my post was trying to say.
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I think you misread my post, or in fairness, I should say perhaps my post was not clear.

I was attempting to explain that by adding all the Sonos devices to your DHCP Reservation Table, they would then get their 'allocated' IP address each time... so it’s their own individual and unique IP address, but the IP same address is always allocated to the same device, all the time.

I hope that clarifies what my post was trying to say.
clarified. Thanks!!
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Yes, I completely agree with Chicks post too ... I would run your Sonos system on it’s own in-built SonosNet mesh network. Note you don’t necessarily have to buy a Boost, you can just cable a nearby speaker to your main Orbi hub and that will initiate the SonosNet mesh network. You only need the Boost if one of your speakers are not near enough to cable.


Just wanted to add that you should get the same result if you connect a speaker to one of the Orbi satellites as well. It doesn't have to be the hub if that's not convenient.

I actually do have Orbi myself, run Sonos on Sonosnet, and the setup has be rather solid.
Thanks melvimbe, I wasn’t too sure on that point about the Orbi cable connection. I shall remember it in the future.
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Yes, I completely agree with Chicks post too ... I would run your Sonos system on it’s own in-built SonosNet mesh network. Note you don’t necessarily have to buy a Boost, you can just cable a nearby speaker to your main Orbi hub and that will initiate the SonosNet mesh network. You only need the Boost if one of your speakers are not near enough to cable.


Just wanted to add that you should get the same result if you connect a speaker to one of the Orbi satellites as well. It doesn't have to be the hub if that's not convenient.

I actually do have Orbi myself, run Sonos on Sonosnet, and the setup has be rather solid.
the room with the modem cannot have a speaker in it. Long story ?
In my experience using Sonos in WiFi mode (i.e. no Ethernet wired connections to any Sonos speakers or using a Boost) with multiple wireless access points leads to poor results. The problem is that Sonos speakers don't seem to implement any roaming techniques and thus will attach to a WAP and hold onto that connection no matter what even if a better/closer/stronger signal WAP available. You will see this happen for example if you reboot a WAP where any Sonos speakers attached to that WAP will then seek out and attach to the next best WAP but once the rebooted WAP is back online they never roam back. This leaves them with poor connections even when a better connection is possible. So sadly you can have the best WiFi network in the world with access points close to every Sonos speaker and still get erratic results which is very frustrating.

Sonos did a really amazing job developing SonosNet to where it will constantly adjust the mesh transparently to seamlessly figure out the best method to interconnect all the speakers and if you Ethernet connect multiple speakers acting as "hubs" it will even work better. Keep in mind you have to implement spanning tree protocols on your network if connect multiple hard wired speakers.

If Sonos implemented even rudimentary WiFi roaming capabilities or better yet, advanced 802.11r and 802.11k, fast roaming protocols, then it would make the WiFi mode of Sonos work amazingly well but they don't seem to care about fixing the existing WiFi limitations. Currently Sonos WiFi mode is really only usable for those with a single access point and all the speakers in close range to that one access point.

It's really a shame since many people have worked to create great WiFi networks at home to make latency sensitive applications such as VoIP, video conferencing, and WiFi cellular calling work well and yet Sonos works poorly in such environments.