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Sonos with Ubiquiti Amplifi

  • 5 August 2018
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I've searched, and current info on this subject is a little scant.

I'm looking for a replacement for my soon-to-be-EOL Airport Network, and am taking a long look at Ubiquiti Amplifi.

Should I expect it to play well with my Sonos (I have about 15 zones, about half-half wired and wireless)?

Anything I should be watchful for? TiA...
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Best answer by buzz 5 August 2018, 01:20

The SONOS boxes will not care that the WiFi changes hands because you are using SonosNet. SonosNet ignores WiFi and WiFi ignores SonosNet. Be sure to set the new WiFi access points use channel 1, 6, or 11, don't use "Auto". Avoid the temptation to set each access point for maximum output because one can create a situation where the client sees a signal from a distant access point but the client's transmitter is not strong enough to reply to the access point. Two-way communication is not practical, but the client thinks that it has found a great access point. Minimize overlapping areas using the same channel.

The most important point is that you should reboot EVERYTHING on your network after replacing the router. Ubiquiti will probably call this "Fixed IP Address", but you should "reserve" an IP address for all of the regular network clients, such as SONOS, computers, TV's, pads, phones, thermostats, etc. It's a good idea to check the DHCP address range from the old router and duplicate this assignment on the new router. I once created a little issue for myself when I changed the DHCP range -- just slightly -- what could go wrong? -- I know what I'm doing, right? Arrogance can get one burned because I forgot about a tiny little device hidden in a cabinet. A couple weeks later I started having intermittent network trouble. Finally, I swallowed my pride and checked the network in detail. -sigh- "duplicate IP address", fail networking 101. That little guy used a fixed IP address that was now inside the DHCP range and assigned to my NAS drive.
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The SONOS boxes will not care that the WiFi changes hands because you are using SonosNet. SonosNet ignores WiFi and WiFi ignores SonosNet. Be sure to set the new WiFi access points use channel 1, 6, or 11, don't use "Auto". Avoid the temptation to set each access point for maximum output because one can create a situation where the client sees a signal from a distant access point but the client's transmitter is not strong enough to reply to the access point. Two-way communication is not practical, but the client thinks that it has found a great access point. Minimize overlapping areas using the same channel.

The most important point is that you should reboot EVERYTHING on your network after replacing the router. Ubiquiti will probably call this "Fixed IP Address", but you should "reserve" an IP address for all of the regular network clients, such as SONOS, computers, TV's, pads, phones, thermostats, etc. It's a good idea to check the DHCP address range from the old router and duplicate this assignment on the new router. I once created a little issue for myself when I changed the DHCP range -- just slightly -- what could go wrong? -- I know what I'm doing, right? Arrogance can get one burned because I forgot about a tiny little device hidden in a cabinet. A couple weeks later I started having intermittent network trouble. Finally, I swallowed my pride and checked the network in detail. -sigh- "duplicate IP address", fail networking 101. That little guy used a fixed IP address that was now inside the DHCP range and assigned to my NAS drive.

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