Android and Trueplay



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Userlevel 7
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Why not check the Sonos website (https://support.sonos.com/s/article/3222) before wildly borrowing and ordering iOS devices?

Userlevel 1
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@Thorium Prime Or you could just borrow an iOS device from a friend or relative for 10 minutes. You only need to perform Trueplay tuning once.

Yes, or until I rearrange something. :) Truth to be told, I have some  other audio hardware that needs an iOS device, and my borrowed (stolen from my kids) iPad 3 is getting a bit long in the tooth. Time to upgrade to a 6th generation I think…  

Agree on the old iPhone, I have one myself.

I call BS on the “variability/variation argument”, especially with modern mems microphone packages. All manufacturers would have variations across batches (including Apple).

Wherever the “umpteen variations of mic supply” statement comes from, doesn’t mean it still holds true today and is true for all Android manufacturers. I would be very surprised if the Google Pixel 6 flagship had any more mic variability than an iPhone (my opinion). So if your “fact” is from 2015, might be time for them to re-check 7 years later.

Whatever the real reason (technical/marketing/legal), I don’t think we will see TruePlay on Android any time soon.

Thing is, if Sonos had never invented Trueplay and added it as a free upgrade on iOS a few years back, you would probably be delighted with your new Sonos product.  Trueplay sometimes makes little or no difference - it depends on the room.  I haven’t got round to tuning my Arc yet, but love the sound.

Shame you won’t be buying more Sonos - you will miss out on so much.

I call BS on the “variability/variation argument”, especially with modern mems microphone packages.

An assertion that could be just as accurate as the earlier theory that the issue was related to legal cases.

Just ask yourself this: why would Sonos not implement Trueplay on Android if it was as straightforward as with (approved) iDevices? 

Well that’s an easy one, bad blood between them, potential $50M USD in yearly royalties, moving engineering teams to support Alexa instead instead of Google, not wanting to set a legal precedent of supporting Google products during a case (and appeals).

You have made an assumption that the exact same reason has held true since 2015 as to why they haven’t released it.

And you appear to have made a series of completely unfounded assumptions as well. 

Your profile is empty of Sonos products. You joined today, apparently to pick a fight. There’s a word for such antics. I refuse to feed this any further.

 

I call BS on the “variability/variation argument”, especially with modern mems microphone packages.

An assertion that could be just as accurate as the earlier theory that the issue was related to legal cases.

Just ask yourself this: why would Sonos not implement Trueplay on Android if it was as straightforward as with (approved) iDevices? 

Well that’s an easy one, bad blood between them, potential $50M USD in yearly royalties, moving engineering teams to support Alexa instead instead of Google, not wanting to set a legal precedent of supporting Google products during a case (and appeals).

You have made an assumption that the exact same reason has held true since 2015 as to why they haven’t released it.

And you appear to have made a series of completely unfounded assumptions as well. 

Your profile is empty of Sonos products. You joined today, apparently to pick a fight. There’s a word for such antics. I decline to feed this any further.

 

This is all rationale discussion, no one is fighting. I don’t agree with all of your statements and you don’t agree with mine, we are still forum pals right?

I do own Sonus products (6 of them in fact with receipts if you want to see them), I don’t need Sonus products in a profile to actually own Sonus products. This is how “facts” get distorted.

Userlevel 2

Sonos has been complaining about unfair practices from Google and Amazon for loss of customers, and I agree mostly with what Sonos has been saying.  That is another reason I went to Sonos, but if they don’t listen to their customer and come up with lame excuses as to why they cannot support features.  Then that will be why they lose me as a customer not because of Google/Amazon etc.  Customer satisfaction is how you keep customers and I am not satisfied

This is all rationale discussion, no one is fighting. I don’t agree with all of your statements and you don’t agree with mine, we are still forum pals right?

I do own Sonus products (6 of them in fact with receipts if you want to see them), I don’t need Sonus products in a profile to actually own Sonus products. This is how “facts” get distorted.

 

It’s ‘Sonos’, S-O-N-O-S.  How can we take you seriously when you can’t even get the name correct? 

And unless you have two accounts, one to register your products and one to post here (a highly unlikely occurrence), you most certainly would need products in your profile in order to own Sonos products.  Yet another clue to your purpose here. 

I use two sonos five on stereo as test system befor going further with sonos or not. 

After first setup the "standard sound" is disappointing to say it nice. I thought about sending both back. Accidentally a friend dropped and i used her iPhone for this true play stuff and then the sound is, well, ok.

But the system is designated for our cottage where nobody has a iPhone. Again the sound is not bad but far beyond to be good. As long as no iPhone addict drops in Sonos is good as a radio background player. 

Before, i had several other Sonos products on the list but didn't buy any, because of this annoying fact.

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My original point still stands (it is not fact and is my opinion, as stated in my replies).

I would like to know when Sonos would support TruePlay on Android, I doubt it is for microphone variability reasons in 2021 - as it has been claimed. Whether you want to believe what Sonos tells you, or whether I question that makes little different to when/if we ever get it. It’s all just a healthy debate.

I don’t know how many accounts I have (and nor do I care), but sounds like I must have registered in here with a different email address than my Sonos app. I have Sonos products as stated, however that appears in a forum I will leave to whoever runs the forum. Wasn’t aware I should have checked my profile to make sure it was an exact match before chatting in here. So no, you don’t need Sonos products on your profile, even though you own said products.

You don't have to take me seriously, just do some critical thinking rather than sprouting what everyone else says. I’m not here to pick a fight, and yes mentioned Sonos multiple times so you can see I know how to spell it.

Good day to you all.

 

I’m confused by your statement. The TruePlay tuning is stored on the speakers, until erased by doing another TruePlay tuning. Once it’s done, you can turn it off or on, using the Android devices. There is zero requirement, once TruePlay is done, for there to be a iOS device in the house. 

Take care!  Brush your hair!

Userlevel 2

@John B your attitude is amazing and calling a feature I require a pet feature is uncalled for. They advertise this feature without notation of exception on their main page of the Arc product with is deceptive.  Since this feature is not a concern for you I see no reason why you even replied on this thread.

Calibrating audio for any room is an essential.  Audio equipment is designed for a perfectly acoustical environment which is impossible in a house unless you design a dedicated room for it.  Every system I have calibrated over the last 17 years has made a HUGE difference in sound quality coming from the equipment.  What you call my “pet feature” I call ensuring I am getting the best from my purchase.  

 

As far as the lawsuit it is because they cannot keep up with the cheap devices that Amazon and Google and to defend their IP which is definitely a must and I stand behind Sonos to do so. 
 https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/07/technology/sonos-sues-google.html 

“Sonos’s entry-level speaker is about $200. Amazon and Google’s cheapest speakers are $50, and they often offer them at much steeper discounts.

In the third quarter of 2019, Amazon shipped 10.5 million speakers and Google six million, according to Strategy Analytics. For the 12 months ending in September, Sonos said it had sold 6.1 million speakers.

“Amazon and Google are making it a mass-market product at a price point that Sonos can’t match,” said Jack Narcotta, a Strategy Analytics analyst.”

 

Userlevel 7
Badge +21

I use Android and have suggested an external mike as a solution too.

I also got a cheap Apple dingus off ebay to solve my TruePlay issues.

I long ago learned to solve Sonos issues myself when possible instead of waiting for Sonos to get to them. Sometimes I’m using my fix for years (SMBv1) or (TruePlay) sometimes Sonos fixes it quickly.

My goal is to enjoy my Sonos as much as possible with minimal aggravation, not to get Sonos to do stuff.

@cpnichols be aware if you rearrange your room or move it to another room you should rerun the calibration as your acoustical environment has changed. 

Something as simple as changing the furniture in you room can effect the acoustical sound even with the Sonos in the same location.

Also another user posted he sent his Sonos in for repair and he lost the TruePlay settings when returned.

Just wanted to make you aware it may not be a one and done :grinning:

 

 

Yeah… I figured. 

ASS-U-ME.

Userlevel 5
Badge +12

Hi everyone. Trying to skip over if it is right or not for Sonos to not have trueplay for Android. I did just get my first Sonos product which is an ARC. We have no Apple devices in our house but I am hoping to ask a neighbor to borrow theirs to do the one time trueplay tuning. That being said, what minimum iPhone should they have, and what would they need to do on their end before letting me borrow the phone? I am assuming that they need to download the Sonos App, then I just need to log into my account and find the trueplay setting in the app. Is that correct? Anything else?


also the small matter of giving them access to your wifi too. Also don’t forget to revoke their access and remove the app before giving the phine back otherwose they’ll be able to control your Sonos system! 

Userlevel 7
Badge +21

They need to be on your wifi. Remember after tuning to remove your wifi credentials from their phone after doing trueplay. 
Their iPhone needs to be a 6 or later running ios 11 or later. 
Install the Sonos app and if on your wifi it should find your system, when prompted connect to existing system .  You don’t need to sign in to perform trueplay.

 

 Once done disconnect from your wifi and remove the wifi credentials.  Remove the app if you want too, it can’t reconnect to your system without your wifi credentials anyway.

 

 Good luck.  In some rooms I’ve found trueplay to make big positive difference, mainly taking the boom out of the sound .   Some rooms it makes little difference.  The biggest benefit for me is the way it tamed the Sub.

 

 

 

I do agree that android trueplay needs to come. The difference to how the Arc sounds with and without it is absolutely massive. Can’t expect everyone to have Apple products and Sonos shouldn’t be selling a product that requires something else to make it sound better anyway. Fair enough if it was minimal difference, but for me it makes it sound a good 70% better have trueplay. Hopefully with the new roam technology using the inbuilt mic to tune, maybe it will come to the other speakers soon with inbuilt mics.

Some report little difference in the sound, but I found it made a huge difference to my Play 5 probably due to it’s siting which is not ideal acoustically. 

Unfortunately the person whose phone I borrowed to do set up Trueplay lives in France, so is unlikely to visit soon, and I lost the Trueplay setting when I had the unit repaired.

I suspect that Sonos will now rely on the built in mics in more modern kit, and will hope that the issue simply goes away.

I am an Android user and +1 to this. I fully understand the wide variety of Android devices and MIC characteristics make it a nightmare, though narrowing to Samsung/Pixel would reduce that. Simply providing a calibrated MIC can end this phone-specific mic dependency and make it universal. The local processing should be able to run on any phone except maybe the lowest end ones. My wife uses a supported iPhone so the “borrow” business is easy for me luckily.

Even for iOS devices Sonos has to keep measuring and supporting newer devices every year. Given the time it takes to do that I suspect that is repetitive, grunt engineering effort.

Another thought. The Sonos Roam/Move includes a TruePlay MIC. Why not allow using that to TruePlay other Sonos devices in the network. Should make sense from a sales point of view as well :grinning:

Userlevel 7

Android users have been complaining about not being able to do Trueplay tuning for years yet they still continue to purchase Sonos products. Sonos must be doing something right.

Trueplay on Android being microphone dependant is just a stupid excuse not to implement it. A calibrated microphone costs nothing compared to Sonos or iOs products. On Android devices we are able to use external mics. A Dayton Audio iMM-6 costs 40$ and MiniDSP UMIK-1 costs 80$ and both work perfectly on any Android device. Why not just assume that everyone has a calibrated mic and enable Trueplay on Android? Then if the user is using an Android device’s internal microphone and the result is crappy he can disable Trueplay. This is not rocket science.

 

Did a little googling.  The Dayton clearly states that it’s designed for use with Apple products, and that’s calibrated.  It states that it works with android too, but doesn’t say anything about the calibration at that point.  Looks like you can get it calibrated on android, but you have to do some extra works.  Not 100% clear, but does seem to support the idea that calibrated mics is a bit more of an issue on androids then iOS.

https://www.daytonaudio.com/product/1117/imm-6-idevice-calibrated-measurement-microphone

As for the MiniDSP...$80 seems generous.  Also apparently only supports Windows, Mac, and Linux.  But maybe there’s another version that I’m not seeing.

https://www.parts-express.com/miniDSP-UMIK-1-Omni-directional-USB-Measurement-Calibrated-Microphone-230-332

 

Anyway, I don’t see that assuming customers have their own calibrated mic is a good assumption.  Nor do I think it’s a good idea to allow customers to do trueplay when it will likely be flawed. 

Userlevel 7
Badge +22

I have no Android devices, but I have never bothered with Trueplay on any of my iOS devices.I consider it a niche feature that I have no interest in trying with on my ten Sonos devices.

I have no Android devices, but I have never bothered with Trueplay on any of my iOS devices.I consider it a niche feature that I have no interest in trying with on my ten Sonos devices.

I found it made a big difference, particularly on pop music at higher volumes where the uncorrected device was very poor. I only managed to tune it as a friend visited with an iphone - the original itouch that I bought to control the Sonos kit was obsoleted years ago and I’m certainly not buying another one.

Indeed, I thought that the tuning made such a big difference that I finally tuned by AV receiver/system, with a similar degree of improvement. 

ISTM that compensating for different room acoustics is the way forward.

I realize it’s not the same thing exactly, but I think the best way to hear the difference tuning makes is with the Move and it’s auto trueplay.  Let it sit in one location for awhile then move it to a different location in the house.  You can immediately tell that it doesn’t sound as good in the new location until the trueplay fixes things.

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