Question

Is there any way to put a password on your sonos system?

  • 13 February 2013
  • 108 replies
  • 44274 views


Show first post
This topic has been closed for further comments. You can use the search bar to find a similar topic, or create a new one by clicking Create Topic at the top of the page.

108 replies

Sonos is basically saying that they dont care about a corporate market... they dont want to be in restaurants, hotels or cafes.... pretty flippin STUPID.... I own a gallery and have spent the whole flippin night re-setting up speakers and re-setting playlists.... i gave the wifi password to the lessee of the event space and they gave it to everyone else!   Half the time the music was down with everyone playing with the sonos or keeping the wifi too busy to buffer music!
Badge
Millions of ways around this issue as has been stated by myself and others. Its a nice to have to ultimately not a limiting factor to anyone buisness or private purchasing. I suppose takes a little know how but anything can be worked around. If you like any suggestions or ways to circumvent anyone messing with it more then happy to help. Can go from super easy to as complicated as you like. I will through this out there, many devices on the market today has dual wireless functionality. The "main" and "guest". Put one of those devices in place, only allow guests to use guest and you never have a problem. And that is just one option.
Userlevel 3
There are many features we would all like to see on the Sonos, personally I don't see this one hitting the development list. But who knows. If you don't trust people on your network, the options are, A) don't give them the password. 😎 bar them by mac address if they already have it. Not foolproof I know, but a solution. C) Create a guest network for those 'friends', boyfriends, lesees, postman, next doors dog who is abusing yours, but for some reason have to have wifi access. D) Change your wifi password and then find new friends, dog, etc. Remember, if these users/guests are changing your Sonos system, just think what else they may be doing! That would scare me. As Thomas said, many answers to what is really a non-problem, just a nice to have. Lets be honest, if Sonos spent time and money will it generate business benefit, possibly , but not much in reality. I would personally prefer they spent their resources elsewhere. Just my 2pennies. 🙂 Graham
I am okay with PW protecting my network to keep people out, however I am using the Sonos Bridge so Im assuming they don't have to log into my WIFI network and can just log into the Bridge, and we all know they will.  Hell I would at their house.  Am I wrong about this, meaning do they still need my Wifi PW to access the Bridge or can any Sonos APP'd device connect to the Bridge and control my music? 
Userlevel 7
Badge +22
Only Android devices have ability to log directly into SonosNet.

I'm for an option you can activate "Party Mode" that if active only controllers that enter password can get full access.  Non-password activated controllers only get ability to add to que.
I am okay with PW protecting my network to keep people out, however I am using the Sonos Bridge so Im assuming they don't have to log into my WIFI network and can just log into the Bridge, and we all know they will.  Hell I would at their house.  Am I wrong about this, meaning do they still need my Wifi PW to access the Bridge or can any Sonos APP'd device connect to the Bridge and control my music? 
Only Android devices can log onto Sonosnet, and they first have to connect to your WiFi, then connect to Sonos in order to do it.
I now put Sonos 1, 3, 5 and connect in most of our house but since most friends know we have sonos, they constantly change music. People are requesting an option to protect their sonos since more than 3 years. Will you finally do something or will you just watch people leaving Sonos for something that has access control? This should have been on your priority list since a long time
Solution is to create a separate network for Sonos. Limit access to that network.
Well I must say that there are some damn fool answers on here in relation to 674433's, Anthony's, TK's and John's fairly simple request. It only occurred to me after I'd bought my Sonos that this could be done (ie trusted guests to whom one's given their wifi password messing with your settings). I won't go to the bother of returning my kit in the "cooling off" period, 'cos I like it too much, but it obviously is an issue that Sonos would do well to address, before it becomes the subject of negative reviews.
Hello, There isn't a way to set a password or limit accessibility of the Sonos system. If someone has an iOS or Android device and is able to connect to your main network and gone through the setup process with the Sonos application they will have access to the system.
Their are some songs you may not want your wife or kids to see right? May have to remove them until you can protect your privacy with a password.
Badge
Well I must say that there are some damn fool answers on here in relation to 674433's, Anthony's, TK's and John's fairly simple request. It only occurred to me after I'd bought my Sonos that this could be done (ie trusted guests to whom one's given their wifi password messing with your settings). I won't go to the bother of returning my kit in the "cooling off" period, 'cos I like it too much, but it obviously is an issue that Sonos would do well to address, before it becomes the subject of negative reviews.

There are quite a few stupid answers, but most are trying to be helpful. Though ignorance is bliss and they are prime examples of such. I know this is going to piss off a bunch but i really dont care anymore. If you have "friends" that wont respect your belongings and things then find new friends. The ones in my life that i just cant replace that do me wrong in this regard i return the favor trying to get them to understand a point. It only takes once and i dont have an issue with them anymore or they go off and find others they can terrorize and i dont have to deal with them anymore. If someone does this to you after you have asked them not too. go let the air out of one of their tires the next time they come over and let them know you did it because they were being an ass. They will understand and stop or be out of your life. Either way your done with it. And to boot, have a bike pump handy so they can pump it back up by hand. Thatll teachum.
Today the same question was mailed tot SONOS and i got the answer that everybody who has access to my network would be able to access the SONOS system. Yeah right, very simple answer but not a solution and not at all an answer on my question! I've just bought the Playbar, Sub an two Play 1's. Thank you SONOS !
Today the same question was mailed tot SONOS and i got the answer that everybody who has access to my network would be able to access the SONOS system. Yeah right, very simple answer but not a solution and not at all an answer on my question! I've just bought the Playbar, Sub an two Play 1's. Thank you SONOS !
Consider setting up a guest network. Most modern routers have this feature. Then guests can use your internet, but cannot access anything on your local lan.
Badge
Today the same question was mailed tot SONOS and i got the answer that everybody who has access to my network would be able to access the SONOS system. Yeah right, very simple answer but not a solution and not at all an answer on my question! I've just bought the Playbar, Sub an two Play 1's. Thank you SONOS !
This has been kicked around for years now, search through forums there are plenty of viable options for keeping anyone you want out, out.
Unfortunately the silence from Sonos is deafening. Not even their technical people have replied to the idea.

The suggestion that I might want to invest in a seven or eight zone system is rapidly disappearing over the horizon. Some open-ness on Sonos's part would go a long way to allaying fears that it is simply another betamax!
Userlevel 2
Yesterday I installed Sonos connect and connect amp in a business where the two zones accomodate both the CEO's office and a separate zone for the sales offices. My first inclination was to find a way to isolate the two from a permission standpoint so there would be no accidental streaming to one zone or the other. I couldn't find it so I started searching and came here for advice, I cannot believe there isn't a simple feature to password protect or even hide zones. This seems like a very basic and doable tool to implement.
Userlevel 2
Hi ratty, can you please explain a little bit?
Thanks,
Kevin
Correct me if I'm wrong but aren't you a professional Sonos installer?
Is there still no fix on this? I live in an apartment with two friends, I know of I put a sonos speaker in my room and forget to unplug it, I'm going to be constantly woken up.

Are their other systems out there where you are able to password protect or lock to specific device/s?
Is there still no fix on this? I live in an apartment with two friends, I know of I put a sonos speaker in my room and forget to unplug it, I'm going to be constantly woken up.
They're not exactly 'friends' then.

If you set your Sonos up as one system, and there's another Sonos system in the house, then your so-called friends would need to invade your room to register a controller app on their phones by pushing buttons on your speaker. If yours is the only Sonos in the house then you'd have to deliberately create a second Sonos system, otherwise a controller app would automatically find your Sonos unit. A second system can be as small as a BRIDGE, bought off eBay.

Are their other systems out there where you are able to password protect or lock to specific device/s?

This is a Sonos board.
Badge
The point of these systems is that they are as simple to setup and operate as possible, sticking passwords or PIN codes at every stage does not qualify on that front. I can already imagine the number of "Why does Sonos keep asking me for a password?" threads that would appear on here if they did implement something like this.

As with many modern devices, the passcode could be optional- just like securing a WiFi Router can be optional. SONOS can be left wide open with no passcode for those users who don't require one.
This is most certainly needed. In fact you should go full out and on iOS take advantage of the touch-ID to authenticate users.
The fact that Sonos devices have NO security at all is somewhat worrying actually - it could theoretically be used as a vector for all sorts of other security issues - it runs Linux after all so is a fairly open platform underneath.
I'm confused by your statement. I use iOS almost exclusively to "control" my Sonos system. But all of my iOS devices are locked after a minute of non interaction, and the only things that you can do on the lock screen is start/stop, skip or replay a track. How does this indicate "no security"? While I can't look at the screen right now, not being at home, I'm 90% sure that I don't have access to the change the playlist / location of music. So to do anything else, I have to unlock my iOS device, using Apple's process. But maybe I'm not understanding your statement?

Please inform me on the theory as to how this could be used as a vector for security issues. I'd be most interested to know.
I see. Thanks for the explanation.

If that was an issue for me, I'd have the Sonos on the public side of my network, which would restrict access to all of my "secure" devices. But at the end of the day, if something is connected to the internet in any way, it's potentially accessible, no matter what "lock down" you implement.

But I have to chose between the internet of things, and security. So I'm somewhat rigorous in who I give access to my network to, and hence my sonos contorlling devices. It's not perfect, I'd agree, but I'm not sure how Sonos could make it much better. At the end of the day, it's my call as to whom I give access to, not Sonos'.
Anyone connected to your wifi network has full control of your Sonos. Might be ok for some, but the option of password/pin protecting access has been requested many times.


Doesn't this exist even now? How can anyone connect to the Wifi without the Wifi password? And if Sonos had a password, but the Wifi was accessed, how does the Sonos password offer any protection against such attacks? What is the incentive for a hacker to attack just the Sonos devices? Can someone access the WiFi via Sonos without having the WiFi password? Or hack into that somehow via Sonos as it is just now, with no password protection of its own?
Anyone connected to your wifi network has full control of your Sonos. Might be ok for some, but the option of password/pin protecting access has been requested many times.


Doesn't this exist even now? How can anyone connect to the Wifi without the Wifi password? And if Sonos had a password, but the Wifi was accessed, how does the Sonos password offer any protection against such attacks? What is the incentive for a hacker to attack just the Sonos devices? Can someone access the WiFi via Sonos without having the WiFi password? Or hack into that somehow via Sonos as it is just now, with no password protection of its own?


The problem comes when people have the password. Friends, or an office environment where people share the same network, family members. They have full control over your Sonos as it has no password. As for hacks, this is just a theoretical scenario. Access could be gained by using another compromised device inside your network. But my point is that Sonos needs to take security more seriously. For all I know, they do lot of work behind the scenes, but not having a password to authenticate a client device doesn't bode well.

Come on Sonos - just configure a password or pin that each device needs to enter once the first time it tries to connect to a device.