SO SO disappointed with SONOS, APPS absolutely useless, which makes the system useless

  • 12 August 2020
  • 33 replies
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I haven’t bothered to go digging, but presumably later Creston models do support an Android version recent enough to run Sonos S2?

Yes, but they don’t support the legacy lighting & control systems already installed throughout buildings. For example, our building runs Crestron, (Sonos), Philips Dynalite, SilentGliss, CoolAutomation, Chamberlain MyQ & some alarm system I can’t remember the name of. They all integrate & are controllable through the Crestron touch panels. The new Crestron systems (which run S2) don’t support Dynalite, and that’s fine. Crestron has committed to supporting the older systems for a long time to come, because they understand that buildings aren’t upgraded as often as phones. Sonos should have understood that before they committed to supporting/partnering with a system that integrates into a bulding.

Sonos should have understood that before they committed to supporting/partnering with a system that integrates into a bulding.

Hindsight is a great thing, but Sonos clearly couldn’t be held back by such legacy issues now otherwise their very business survival could be at risk.

It appears that the only solution would be to back-port S2 onto older Android versions. Doubtless there are technical reasons -- such as the advantages they’ve taken of the evolution of the operating system -- why this is difficult. 

Commercially it might make sense for Crestron to fund some such semi-bespoke development, but I dare say that’s already been considered.

I think there is confusion about the nature of the relationship between Sonos and Creston.  I don’t think it’s really accurate to call it a partnership, as I don’t think Sonos entered in some sort of contract specific with Creston.  Sonos actually has an open API setup so that anyone can develop software to control a Sonos system. They keep the API relatively static, but obviously, it will change from time to time.  It’s up to the other software to adjust their use of the API accordingly.

So in terms of Creston, Creston is responsible for updating their code.  Sonos can provide some assistance with this if Creston wanted help, or involve Creston in testing before S2 was released, but it’s ultimately Creston who is responsible.

As far as Creston’s ability to update their android touchscreen, that likely has nothing to do with Sonos.  Sonos doesn’t have software on those devices (I assume), it’s only Creston’s custom software, using the open APIs.  Sonos dropping support for older OS versions for their controller app should not have an impact on Creston’s software.

Regarding the comment that Sonos should allow a SysAdmin to prevent users from upgrading the system...Sonos is designed for home use primarily, not for use on commercial properties.  You can use it for business, as many do, but that is not what it was designed for.  It’s a bit much to expect Sonos to start catering design features for customers that are not it’s primary market, at least until Sonos has stated they are looking to serve the business market with a business version of the controller.  That said, I do think the notifications pushing people to move from S1 to S2 need to go.  It’s been over 6 months now, and people clearly know it can be done.  The notifications are probably causing more issues, pushing folks to upgrade before they understand the implications, rather than assisting.

 

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I think there is confusion about the nature of the relationship between Sonos and Creston.  I don’t think it’s really accurate to call it a partnership, as I don’t think Sonos entered in some sort of contract specific with Creston.  Sonos actually has an open API setup so that anyone can develop software to control a Sonos system. They keep the API relatively static, but obviously, it will change from time to time.  It’s up to the other software to adjust their use of the API accordingly.

So in terms of Creston, Creston is responsible for updating their code.  Sonos can provide some assistance with this if Creston wanted help, or involve Creston in testing before S2 was released, but it’s ultimately Creston who is responsible.

As far as Creston’s ability to update their android touchscreen, that likely has nothing to do with Sonos.  Sonos doesn’t have software on those devices (I assume), it’s only Creston’s custom software, using the open APIs.  Sonos dropping support for older OS versions for their controller app should not have an impact on Creston’s software.

 

I don’t think this is right. The press releases stated a partnership, and other web pages from Crestron suggested that their integration with Sonos would be suitable for a commercial environment. And I think that Crestron uses a native Sonos app, not just the APIs from Sonos, at least that’s the way it seems to look on the touch panels, with a brand new app labelled “Sonos” launching to control the Sonos system.

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Well, a good outcome for me in the end. I won’t go into detail here. I have another thread where I’ve written more. It required a Sonos tech to remote access into my network, but the end result is that my system is now back on S1 & shouldn’t nag about moving to S2 again. All is working as it should. 

Haters will always hate. 

Lots of them are here to whinge in general and can’t even explain what is wrong with their system. How to help when they can’t even articulate the problem other than cry like a self entitled consumers who always claim to spend lots of money on many SONOS products - Why did they buy more than 1 when they have issue?

I think SONOS need to put some buyers restriction on their products. Example:-

*** Warning ***

  1. Products always work in a normal home network environment. 
  2. If you have problem downloading Sonos apps and connecting to new Sonos speakers in the first instance, please immediately return the product as the product is not suitable for you or your home network.
  3. If you choose to keep the Sonos product, please ensure you are able to articulate the issues by writing down the What / Where / When / How observations.
  4. We are here to help, if you want to get help.
  5. There is no age restrictions but if you are not mature in your way of thinking it is not suitable for you, … at all. 
  6.  Sonos occasionally have softwares update and if you have issue, please see point 1. 

  

 

 

 

SONOS ARE LIKE iPhones.

THEY LIKE TO PLAY WITH THE CONSUMER AND MAKE SPEND HIS MONEY IN NEW TRASH WHEN THE OLD ONE STILL USEFUL BUT NOT LETS GONNA PLAY WITH THEIR BATERY WITH SONOS MORE WITH THE NETWORK OR INTERNET.

SONOS ARE LIKE iPhones.

THEY LIKE TO PLAY WITH THE CONSUMER AND MAKE SPEND HIS MONEY IN NEW TRASH WHEN THE OLD ONE STILL USEFUL BUT NOT LETS GONNA PLAY WITH THEIR BATERY WITH SONOS MORE WITH THE NETWORK OR INTERNET.

 

Show me an iPhone manufactured in 2005 that is still functional today?

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