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View Log files

  • 18 September 2016
  • 6 replies
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Hi, is there any way to look at log/event files of some type for Sonos? I am not having a problem but curious. I can't seem to find any beyond what is on the About Sonus page. -Bob
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Best answer by ratty 18 September 2016, 15:52

Go to http://Player_IP_address:1400/support/review. Choose an IP from About My Sonos System.

All you see there is for Sonos internal use only, and is undocumented, but we've figured out a few things over the years.

The main application log is at /opt/log/anacapa.trace. Timestamps use the offset internal clock.
The Linux system log is at /bin/dmesg. Timestamps are seconds from boot.,

Of potential interest is the RF information at /proc/ath_rincon/status, though the Network Matrix provides this in a more concise and digestible format. If the system isn't in SonosNet mode (aka 'BOOST Setup') then the matrix is meaningless.

/proc/ath_rincon/phyerr is a histogram of physical errors on the RF over the last 20 minutes.
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6 replies

Go to http://Player_IP_address:1400/support/review. Choose an IP from About My Sonos System.

All you see there is for Sonos internal use only, and is undocumented, but we've figured out a few things over the years.

The main application log is at /opt/log/anacapa.trace. Timestamps use the offset internal clock.
The Linux system log is at /bin/dmesg. Timestamps are seconds from boot.,

Of potential interest is the RF information at /proc/ath_rincon/status, though the Network Matrix provides this in a more concise and digestible format. If the system isn't in SonosNet mode (aka 'BOOST Setup') then the matrix is meaningless.

/proc/ath_rincon/phyerr is a histogram of physical errors on the RF over the last 20 minutes.
Badge +1
Go to http://Player_IP_address:1400/support/review. Choose an IP from About My Sonos System.

All you see there is for Sonos internal use only, and is undocumented, but we've figured out a few things over the years.

The main application log is at /opt/log/anacapa.trace. Timestamps use the offset internal clock.
The Linux system log is at /bin/dmesg. Timestamps are seconds from boot.,

Of potential interest is the RF information at /proc/ath_rincon/status, though the Network Matrix provides this in a more concise and digestible format. If the system isn't in SonosNet mode (aka 'BOOST Setup') then the matrix is meaningless.

/proc/ath_rincon/phyerr is a histogram of physical errors on the RF over the last 20 minutes.



Hello Ratty,

Your post above is exactly what I've been looking for to troubleshoot my 15 node Sonos system which has started dropping out on one or two speakers. The Network Matrix is brilliant!

I see the post is 2 years old, and I can't seem to find the RF physical errors for the past 20 mins. information. Each time I try I get 404.

I've tried all combinations of the /proc/ath..... attached to the player's IP address (after 1400, after support/, after review/ etc.

Has this function been removed since your post, or am I simply not looking in the right place? It'd be really helpful if you could show it in the same form as http://Player_IP_address:1400/support/review but with the end bit pointing to the RF physical errors location.

Regards,


Carl
I see the post is 2 years old, and I can't seem to find the RF physical errors for the past 20 mins. information. Each time I try I get 404.
In the intervening period Sonos have withdrawn from user view a mass of useful diagnostic information, on the grounds of security. Evidently alarming numbers of users were thoughtlessly forwarding ports through their routers, exposing Sonos internals to the internet.
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Thanks for the quick reply Ratty. It's a shame Sonos has done that, but I can see why. As time goes by it seems that some Sonos systems are more prone to audio dropping out (and then starting the next track). I wonder if it's due to the increased congestion in the 2.4GHz band with more people having repeaters, mesh systems etc to overcome the congestion, which only makes it worse!

My system's been solid for years (Sonosnet) but in the past few months been getting more dropouts. I've hard-wired two of the speakers in strategic places which has helped but still get interrupted music once or twice a week which is disappointing. It wouldn't be too difficult for Sonos to add some automated troubleshooting to the app in the form 'Your music was interrupted just now because the unit named xxx had a low signal. Try moving it away from metalwork or relocating it, or plugging it into a network socket'. Then at least users with more than one speaker would have a clue what to do to sort it out!
Well, of course audio dropouts stem from packet loss, and that can have a myriad of possible causes, both inside the local network and outside on the internet. There is some standard troubleshooting advice in the FAQ articles, which is much more comprehensive that anything a controller could feasibly communicate in an error message. At the end of the day Sonos Support can always be consulted, to try and isolate the root cause.

Apart from more junk in the 2.4GHz band, these days home networks have undoubtedly become more complex, what with extenders, meshes, etc. Unfortunately these often don't play well with Sonos, particularly if the user has deliberately configured their system to work in WiFi ("wireless") mode, or they've reverted to SonosNet mode and forgotten to remove WiFi credentials from the system. If the system goes into 'mixed mode' unintentionally it can result in connectivity issues when rooms are grouped, or within stereo pairs (a special type of group).
On other thing: Older systems often include a Bridge, and it's well known that their power supplies can degrade with age. This typically leads to intermittent connectivity problems which can be frustrating to track down.

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