Playbar - Usage of the 2 Ethernet connectors


Hello,

Already owner of a Play-5 I am currently following with interest the arrival of the playbar.

I have 1 question regarding the Ethernet connection of the PlayBar. I could see there are 2 ports and in the specifications it is mentioned :
'A single Ethernet port can connect PLAYBAR to a wired home network. A second Ethernet port can be used to share wireless control.'

My Play-5 is currently connected with Eternet to the router. If I would buy a playbar, it would take the place of the Play-5. the Play-5 would then be moved to another room.

So will the Playbar act as the Play-5 that means be the entry point to the router to then connect other components ?

Thanks for your feedback.

Regards,
Régis

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21 replies

Welcome to the forums.

So will the Playbar act as the Play-5 that means be the entry point to the router to then connect other components ?
Yes. The two Ethernet ports and wireless bridging function are the same in Playbar as in other Sonos units.
Great !!! :D
Thanks for your fast feedback.

Just 1 additional question then.

Why 2 ports ?
All current Sonos units -- except for the Play:3 and SUB -- have two ports. It increases flexibility and allows for daisy-chaining.
Great !!! :D
Thanks for your fast feedback.

Just 1 additional question then.

Why 2 ports ?


Why not? The more the merrier. :D

Seriously, each Ethernet port is not only a way to hardwire the Sonos device, it is also a gateway back to your local network. So one can be used for wiring to the router, another for connecting a Roku box or a Smart TV to your LAN and the internet.
[FONT="Arial Black"]Thank you Jgatie!

This "another for connecting a Roku box or a Smart TV to your LAN and the internet. "

Explains it much clearer than this:

"A second Ethernet port can be used to share wireless control."

Practical examples always help. It's a daisy-chain situation, that's what it's for. Additional uses welcome, kindly use practical examples, as above.

Peace.[/font]
Userlevel 5
Badge +1
Is there any benefit of using the 2 playbar or play 5 ports over a gigabit switch I already for LAN or SONOS net function? Or would all things (besides space) be equal?

Number of ports limitation is not an issue just wondering for performance or function if a sonos port is better or worse than a switch for Daiseyfield chaining
If you have a spare switch port, use it.

It's generally suggested that you don't daisy-chain more than 3 units at a time.

To be specific, the 'network diameter' shouldn't exceed seven. This parameter represents the number of switches traversed in the longest path across the network. A Sonos unit counts as a switch.

The 'no more that 3 in a daisy-chain' rule keeps the network diameter within permitted limits if a user has a simple arrangement with a single switch (or just a router), e.g.:
Sonos Sonos
The number of devices in the line is 7.
Hello all, Iam new in the community, I have one question, is it possible to wire the router directely to the play bar using the first port and then wire a switch to the second port? The switch will be used to connect to the network a PS4, a satellite decoder and the TV. Thanks!
Userlevel 7
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Yes that should work. I assume it makes your wiring less cluttered that way.
Thank you!
Can the Playbar be on ethernet while the other parts of the surround (Play:1 and Sub) are on still on wifi?
Can the Playbar be on ethernet while the other parts of the surround (Play:1 and Sub) are on still on wifi?
If you mean wireless, then yes. The surrounds and SUB will talk directly to the PLAYBAR via its own 5GHz wireless.
Cool.

So Sonos creates its own proprietary private wireless network? That's amazing. I thought all of the speakers were running all of the audio through the router.

So if I run ethernet to the Playbar it will use the ethernet to stream music from the source, but it will play everything through it's proprietary wireless network?
When a single Sonos unit is wired, the system goes into SonosNet mode. The units set up a dedicated 2.4GHz wireless mesh, where each talks to its neighbours, acting as receiver and transmitter. The whole system then connects back to the router through the wired unit. It's WiFi-like, but isn't actually WiFi.

PLAYBAR is a special case, in that its wireless satellites (surrounds and SUB) always talk directly to the PLAYBAR using 5GHz connections. So in your case PLAYBAR fetches the data over Ethernet, then sends the relevant channels to the surrounds and SUB.
Amazing. Thanks for the info.
One last question. I had the Playbar on its own 2.4 Ghz wifi network. Nothing else used the 2.4 network as all of my other devices are 5 Ghz. Now I have wired ethernet to the Playbar. Does this mean I can shut down the 2.4 Ghz network?
One last question. I had the Playbar on its own 2.4 Ghz wifi network. Nothing else used the 2.4 network as all of my other devices are 5 Ghz. Now I have wired ethernet to the Playbar. Does this mean I can shut down the 2.4 Ghz network?
If nothing's using that 2.4GHz WiFi then you can turn it off if you want.
Userlevel 1
Badge +3
When a single Sonos unit is wired, the system goes into SonosNet mode. The units set up a dedicated 2.4GHz wireless mesh, where each talks to its neighbours, acting as receiver and transmitter. The whole system then connects back to the router through the wired unit. It's WiFi-like, but isn't actually WiFi.

PLAYBAR is a special case, in that its wireless satellites (surrounds and SUB) always talk directly to the PLAYBAR using 5GHz connections. So in your case PLAYBAR fetches the data over Ethernet, then sends the relevant channels to the surrounds and SUB.


Here's a question...I have my PLAY:5 (second gen) wired to my router establishing Sonosnet. In another room I have the 5.1 system with PLAYBAR.

Can I wire my PS4 to the PLAYBAR to give the PS4 internet access without creating any issues??
You can do this and it may work fine. You aren't going to damage anything. Just be aware that SonosNet is designed for reliable audio, not speed. Also, the bandwidth occupied by the PS4 traffic may affect the reliability of music playing on Sonos. But it may not. No harm in trying.
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When a single Sonos unit is wired, the system goes into SonosNet mode. The units set up a dedicated 2.4GHz wireless mesh, where each talks to its neighbours, acting as receiver and transmitter. The whole system then connects back to the router through the wired unit. It's WiFi-like, but isn't actually WiFi.

PLAYBAR is a special case, in that its wireless satellites (surrounds and SUB) always talk directly to the PLAYBAR using 5GHz connections. So in your case PLAYBAR fetches the data over Ethernet, then sends the relevant channels to the surrounds and SUB.


Hello, does SonosNet make Sonos Bridge unit obsolete? Currently have Paybar, 1 Sonos Connect for record player, 2x Sonos 1, and Sub.

Thanks!
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If you have a spare switch port, use it.

It's generally suggested that you don't daisy-chain more than 3 units at a time.

To be specific, the 'network diameter' shouldn't exceed seven. This parameter represents the number of switches traversed in the longest path across the network. A Sonos unit counts as a switch.

The 'no more that 3 in a daisy-chain' rule keeps the network diameter within permitted limits if a user has a simple arrangement with a single switch (or just a router), e.g.:
Sonos Sonos
The number of devices in the line is 7.


Hello, I will connect a Playbar to ethernet router port, and use the spare Playbar port for Smart TV. Is there significant benefit for me to run a standalone ethernet router port to Smart TV directly, instead of "daisy chaining" via Playbar's second port? Playbar will create SonosNet to communicate with 1 Connect (record player), 2x Play: 1, 1 Sub.

Thanks!