Can't connect AGAIN!

  • 20 July 2023
  • 44 replies
  • 14540 views

Userlevel 2

Last week, for about the 20th time in 2 years, my Sonos Play1 wouldn’t work.  App did nothing.  I tried to update the app, nothing.  I saw there was a new app, so I downloaded that. Tried to re-pair my speaker or whatever, nothing.  Then suddenly it works.  No problem.  Everything fine.  I think finally, a new app, this will be better.

Today, nothing.  NOTHING.  Tried to re-set it, won’t work.  Won’t recognize it.  I’ve spent hours on this.  SO frustrated.  The speaker sounds great when it’s work (which is only maybe 50-60% of the times I’ve tried to use it).  Bluetooth would be so much easier!


44 replies

But the PLAY:1 was designed before Bluetooth became a ‘thing’ with Sonos. There just isn’t any Bluetooth electronics inside it. You could certainly get a Roam, which does accept a Bluetooth signal, and then ‘group’ the two rooms together.

On the other hand, you clearly have some sort of network issue going on. Often, I’d suggest wifi interference , but in this case, I suspect a more likely culprit is an issue with your router handing the Sonos a duplicate IP address. Try unplugging all Sonos devices from power, and then reboot your router. Give the router two minutes to come back up before plugging back in your Sonos. Note that this issue is irrespective of Wi-Fi or wired systems. And if it does resolve your issue, I’d heartily recommend looking at your router’s manual to set up reserved IP addresses in the DHCP table. 

Userlevel 2

Yes, I know this doesn’t have Bluetooth. I just spent over an hour on the phone with customer support, and we could not resolve it, but that was basically what he was saying as well.

Setting up “reserved IP addresses in the DHCP table. “ is beyond my knowledge/capabilities. nor do I think I have a manual for my router somewhere. 
But thanks for replying  
 

Userlevel 7
Badge +17

Manuals can be downloaded from the internet. If you post what router you own here, someone will probably post a link to the manual.

Userlevel 2

Thanks.  Yes, I’m aware I can google and download a manual, but really?  Every other device in my home works just fine (Laptop, printer, Nest thermostat, Google Home, smart lights, smart TV, etc).  When I was on the phone with support we even directly wired it with an ethernet cable and it still didn’t work.  They are escalating the issue, but I’m getting close to just throwing the thing off the roof and getting another speaker that does Bluetooth (and it won’t be from Sonos, that’s for sure).  I’m just extremely frustrated and have spent HOURS on this.

They say I will be contacted by email to schedule a time for someone to help me.  (more hours, clearly).

Sonos is certainly a more robust user of your network than any of those other devices you listed, complicated by the fact that each and every time there is a software update, the speakers reboot, and ask your router for a new IP address. While you wait, you could at least temporarily fix the issue by following the process I outlined earlier. It just boils down to how robust the software in your router is. Often, if a router can get into this ‘confused’ state once, it can do so again. Assigning reserved IPs helps forestall that.

Yep, Sonos is a crap system if you need to do all of this just to turn your speaker back on!

And perhaps oddly, I’ve been using my Sonos speakers for well over 10 years, without issue. 

Yep, Sonos is a crap system if you need to do all of this just to turn your speaker back on!

 

Is it really?  What if you only have it do it once?

Userlevel 7
Badge +22

I’d think Sonos should spend the time to identify just what is going on with DHCP addressing and come up with a fix that doesn’t need static/reserved IP addresses. Like other recent bugs getting an actual test case that fails regularly in the lab where it can be debugged isn’t easy.

Until then just set the IPs and move on. It is five minutes, once, and you'll spend double that every time the glitch bites recovering from it.

It would be hard for Sonos to send any (non existent in current designs) commands to fix the IP issues experienced in a router. I suppose they might figure out some obscure way to recognize that they’ve been assigned a duplicate IP, and ask for a fresh one, but it would still be up to the router to hand out a ‘valid’ IP address, something that it has already failed at. 

Userlevel 7
Badge +22

If it was just a duplicate IP it would be easy for Sonos to do a fix, the Linux base they use includes the arping command with the “-D” option to detect that. The proper response to finding a duplicate is another arping command with the “-w” option to update others on the LAN, then issuing another DHCP request by the Sonos.

From my many hours of testing, network monitoring and router-DHCP log reading I did not see any issues with the addresses handed out by my DHCP server or in the Sonos requests sent to it. I tested several routers as well as a bare DHCP server with the same result.

Access to the internal Sonos data would probably show the issue but we can’t get that. I’d lean to Sonos using an older version of the DHCP client, doing something slightly out of the usual in a configuration file, or a boot timing issue where Sonos and the DHCP server get out of sync.

Userlevel 1

I believe, Sonos, that you are missing the point.

Any decent system designer knows that simple connectivity for users who want to “listen”, not be a techie, is critical.

the systems are sold as seamless to install and use … anywhere .., along with delivering high quality sound.

rather than spending countless hours and frustrating more customers, just find a solution that doesn’t involve users being embroiled in this pointless debate

personally, I’m just about ready to ditch my system … I’ve had mine for years and at least twice a year, I have to tear it down completely and restart … after suffering thro painful lack of connectivity one day to experiencing audio bliss the next … it’s just not reliable and I won’t sink anymore if my time or money into a system, that by its architecture, is destined to fail

I believe, Sonos, that you are missing the point.

Any decent system designer knows that simple connectivity for users who want to “listen”, not be a techie, is critical.

the systems are sold as seamless to install and use … anywhere .., along with delivering high quality sound.

rather than spending countless hours and frustrating more customers, just find a solution that doesn’t involve users being embroiled in this pointless debate

personally, I’m just about ready to ditch my system … I’ve had mine for years and at least twice a year, I have to tear it down completely and restart … after suffering thro painful lack of connectivity one day to experiencing audio bliss the next … it’s just not reliable and I won’t sink anymore if my time or money into a system, that by its architecture, is destined to fail

 

Unfortunately “Just fix it!” isn’t a plan, and anybody who lacks the level of “techie” ability needed to reserve IP addresses (which is just slightly above the knowledge it takes to change a Wi-Fi password), shouldn’t be giving a critique of any “architecture”, be it a music system or the house down the street. 

The old adage of “Stay in your lane” applies. 

I believe, Sonos, that you are missing the point.

Any decent system designer knows that simple connectivity for users who want to “listen”, not be a techie, is critical.

the systems are sold as seamless to install and use … anywhere .., along with delivering high quality sound.

rather than spending countless hours and frustrating more customers, just find a solution that doesn’t involve users being embroiled in this pointless debate

personally, I’m just about ready to ditch my system … I’ve had mine for years and at least twice a year, I have to tear it down completely and restart … after suffering thro painful lack of connectivity one day to experiencing audio bliss the next … it’s just not reliable and I won’t sink anymore if my time or money into a system, that by its architecture, is destined to fail

@PoppaK,

This just has to be a bit of a wind-up, what do you mean by …

“…at least twice a year, I have to tear it down completely and restart … after suffering thro painful lack of connectivity"

That’s If you are trying to claim that you factory reset all your Sonos devices and start again from ‘scratch’, twice, every year? … and you’ve only just joined this community forum today, for the first time?

Anyhow, I’m struggling to think of a valid reason to ever do those ‘tear down’ steps (not even once, never mind twice a year) and then start over with a new Sonos Household again.🤷

If that’s true, then you’re really not understanding how Sonos works. You could just simply switch off any one (or two) speaker(s) and keep your Sonos Household safe, until you sort out the network connectivity issues.

I can’t personally recall ever doing a full system reset for my Home Sonos system and I’ve probably changed my Home router-wired/wireless networks at least four times in the past seven+ years or so …and not ever considered taking such a drastic step.

I’m sorry, but it sounds like it’s actually you that’s missing the point here.

“tear it down completely and restart”?

Never, in 16+ years.

Along the way I have obviously resolved the odd wireless issue and, to avoid transient glitches, reserved fixed IP addresses for my kit.

“tear it down completely and restart”?

Never, in 16+ years.

 

15 years, not once.  Even through multiple router changes and a move from one home to another.

Userlevel 1

exactly why I stay away from these forums … a bunch of trolls bashing folks that aren’t like them.

just so you know, I hired tech geeks to address my wireless/network issues eons ago and it runs seamlessly. … and I’ve gone thro multiple network/router changes/upgrades … I’m smart enough to know when I’ve passed the limits of my technical competence and hire experts.  

I only judge products based on performance per the promises of sales people.

So … rather than sit and slag folks on boards, take the time to read what they actually say … and recognize that the rest of the world is not like your simple little bubble

 

… and btw … I faithfully go through the steps that sonos prescribes to resolve connectivity issues from simple off and on to full reset to complete restart.  Until you sit in my house with my system, and understand my circumstance, i believe it would be prudent for you to either withhold comment or seek ways to positively engage …

to confirm, yes, this is why I haven’t engaged in this forum for years … seldom do you get constructive help or insights … just comments from people seeking ways to make themselves feel better at someone else’ expense

seldom do you get constructive help or insights … just comments from people seeking ways to make themselves feel better at someone else’ expense

Hmm… over the last 15 years I’ve helped literally thousands of people. But believe what you will.  

Userlevel 1

as have I … as a part of my professional career … sadly you believe that you’re helping by trashing others when they don’t conform to your bubble … so … “believe what you will”

If “conform[ing] to [one’s] bubble” means having a sound network then yes that’s necessary for Sonos to work reliably. It depends entirely on good intra-subnet communications, unlike devices which simply need to connect out to the internet. 

Userlevel 1

… again … you are missing the point … that is not what Sonos is purporting to deliver

… I will leave you all to make yourselves feel better by crowing about your technical skills as opposed to results delivered by the product

I stand by my words.

… again … you are missing the point … that is not what Sonos is purporting to deliver

… I will leave you all to make yourselves feel better by crowing about your technical skills as opposed to results delivered by the product

 

Car manufacturers purport to deliver enthralling and/or relaxing experiences, but if the road’s full of potholes things tend to head south pretty quickly.

I’m sorry, but you can’t blame Sonos for a deficient local network. They do have staff on hand though who can assist with resolving difficulties. Have you contacted them? They have tools which can analyse the system and the network it sits on.

4 replies, each a rant about the product or about the posters.  I see not one indication, not even a hint, that the poster is requesting our help.  The fixes for this kind of stuff, as my statement about the technical aspect indicated, are not a big stretch.  Matter of fact, I've walked self-described technical illiterates through the steps many times, as have others.

But does the poster want to try these fixes?  It would appear not.  They'd rather slag on the product, make threats to dump it, and criticize the forum and the posters within.  Instead of possibly get a stable, working system, they appear to prefer staying put in their assessment.  Que sera sera.

Userlevel 1

yup … just what I was saying … and if you were listening, you would have seen my comment that I hired  the skills to ensure my network was robust and capable of handling the sonos system … 

did I reach out to sonos to seek help in resolving my issues? absolutely

Were you in my home evaluating either … I think not … so kindly withhold your opinion of what I’m doing wrong until you have all of the relevant information

spare me the platitudes

I expect you will take further shots at me to fuel your ego and make yourselves feel important at my expense but I won’t partake in any more of this waste of time 

It’s the “Trump approach” … if you yell louder, longer you think you’ve won, when actually all you’ve done is proven your insecurity in the world not seeing it your way … the last man standing in these debates is seldom right … the objective is to find a solution

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