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Introducing S2, New App and OS for Sonos

Introducing S2, New App and OS for Sonos
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The next generation of Sonos software is now available. Sonos S2 is a new app and an operating system for compatible devices, which brings support for higher resolution audio, saved groups, support for new Sonos products, and more.

Learn more about the Sonos S2 app on our S2 home page.

 

Support for the newest Sonos products

The all new Sonos Arc, Sonos Five, and Sonos Sub will require the Sonos S2 app. These new players are not supported by the Sonos S1 Controller. 

 

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The new S2 app can save groups of rooms to create groups quickly and easily. Once a group is created, you can select it to start playing music and the players will automatically group up. 

 

High Resolution Audio

 

With S2, Sonos speakers now have support for high resolution audio, 24-bit, 44.1/48kHz for FLAC/ALAC only. This support is for local music libraries shared from computers and network attached drives. We’ve updated the article on Sonos supported music formats here.

The Sonos Arc is a Dolby Atmos soundbar, and S2 brings support for that audio to Sonos for home theater and music. Dolby Atmos can be read from Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby MAT, and Dolby TrueHD. 

 

How to get S2

All Sonos systems will be able to update to Sonos version 11.2, which contains some bug fixes and stability improvements. This version is a new S1 update, and compatible with all players. 

Once the 11.2 update is completed, systems compatible with Sonos S2 will receive a notification that the new app is available. You can tap that notification to start updating and the new app which will guide you through updating compatible players to the new platform. If you don’t see the notification banner, you go to System Tools in Settings to check compatibility and update. Sonos S2 is Sonos version 12.0.

You can check our Sonos S2 Compatibility article for a list of products that are compatible with S2.​​​​​

 

Articles and important information about S2

We will support products on Sonos S1 with bug fixes and security patches, and we will do what we can to ensure they keep working with the music services you love given their limited RAM and processing power.

We’ve put together answers to some of the top questions we’ve seen around S2 here, so please check out the following articles on:

Sonos S2 Overview - A great starting place to learn more about S2.

Sonos S2 Compatibility - Information about the differences between Sonos S2 and S1, including which Sonos products are compatible.

Set up separate S1 and S2 systems - Learn how to set up a separate Sonos S1 system with Sonos products that are not compatible with S2.

Known limitations with separate S1 and S2 Sonos systems - This article covers what you can expect when using two separate S1 and S2 systems.

Set up a separate Sonos S1 system

Remove Sonos products that are not compatible with S2 - Instructions on how to use the product removal tool in the Sonos S1 Controller before updating to Sonos S2.

Information about Trade Up:

If you’re interested in updating older Sonos speakers, here’s all the details on our Trade Up program, a way to get a big discount on any new Sonos products that are S2 compatible.

Trade Up home page - Get a general overview of the Sonos Trade Up program.

Trade Up support article - Step by step instructions on how to trade up your eligible Sonos products.


194 replies

Finally I found the solution for Hi-res and MQA streaming compatibility. 

https://www.bluesound.com

As with most ‘solutions’ - they have a tendency to ‘evaporate’...

 

 

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Finally I found the solution for Hi-res and MQA streaming compatibility. 

https://www.bluesound.com

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So in summary paying for a Hi-Fi subscription to Tidal, Qobus or Deezer does not make sense because Sonos doesn't support it. 

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I mean @kassey22000 posted that they worked with Sonos engineers. I bet you’ve been waiting for years to flex your massive matrix in rebuttal. Who u tryin 2 impress smh


Ken, with all due respect, your premise that Sonos engineers can’t see/change/help or correct home network issues is on the face of it BUNK!   They always ask for diagnostics (which I have submitted probably over 200 times) - They have a full network diagram of my entire home WiFi/wired system, - they have every detail of every router/switch/connection and other devices (many which have been upgraded through the years to help solve potential issues with Sonos), and they have made REAL-TIME changes to networks settings over Remote-PC and other direct-to-my-computer help desk apps with my assistance/approval. They can also remotely (with my permission) reboot my entire Sonos system and look deeply into what’s going on remotely.  

The top tier Sonos support team are awesome and I believe they really know their way around these issues, YET and  once and FOR ALL KEN - They have clearly and repeatedly ADMITTED that it’s their EQUIPMENT and NETWORK - NOT MINE!  

I wish you would QUIT defending the indefensible!  You and the rest of the died-in-the wool fan-boys just give cover and solace to Sonos and enable poor excuses for constantly revised software/firmware (why is it constantly updated/revised?  BECAUSE IT’S BUGGY!).

Sorry but often you guys come off as shills for Sonos and not true consumer/community helpers, which I know is not true, but the perception of this has been expressed here a lot. 

Oh, and Ken, as for that cute little Sonos Support Direct Command-line Matrix, you can say good-bye to that.  Word has it that Sonos has plans to remove that user function just like they did with the customer controlled reboot option!  I found it useful (to a limit) as well, but apparently it has to go.

Cheers

I mean @kassey22000 posted that they worked with Sonos engineers. I bet you’ve been waiting for years to flex your massive matrix in rebuttal. Who u tryin 2 impress smh

I will just mention, that Sonos engineers will not touch other products within a network, nor can they see the physical issues, change hardware, adjust device/wiring locations, or continue to monitor the changes to the local environment. A customers network and other hardware/software is outside their remit, which is aimed at Sonos products only

 

The matrix attached and shared earlier, was geared to show I was being ‘truthful’ (without exaggeration) and that with some thought and consideration, that a stable network environment for Sonos products can be achieved - Sonos is also only a small proportion of my home networked devices and with planning and some small practical changes to hardware/physical locations etc; all things will work together. I am able to reboot other segments of my home network without affecting the Sonos devices for example.
 

It’s also important and helpful to monitor any network, from time to time, as the surrounding environment can and will often change, sometimes on a regular basis.

 

importantly, a wired and wireless network all needs to be stable to begin with and I suspect that’s where the issues lie here - I was simply trying to help kassey2200, as my thoughts (still) are that he perhaps needs to get a "fresh pair of eyes” on site to look at the matter from a network perspective. I honestly do not believe this will turn out to be a Sonos issue, as everything is working fine here. S1 and S2 systems work fine at my friends/family homes and there are many others here who are are not having issues… which leaves the only explanation, that it’s ‘most likely’ a local network environment problem.


Oh and I’m sorry Bumper if the screenshot of my Matrix, or my posts have offended you in some way, it was certainly not my intention to do that.

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I mean @kassey22000 posted that they worked with Sonos engineers. I bet you’ve been waiting for years to flex your massive matrix in rebuttal. Who u tryin 2 impress smh

kassey22000, 

In my humble (non-expert) opinion I still think this will ‘likely’ all come down to your local network and its got little to do with whether ‘other’ wired, or wireless, devices work just fine on your network and communicate with the internet, or not etc. This is about multiple products successfully communicating/streaming across the same subnet and online. Sonos controllers for example and your devices communicate using SSDP, (the UPnP discovery protocol). This is sent as UDP multicast and broadcast and if those packets are not getting through, then that in itself may cause issues for you, this is in addition to other factors of network bandwidth for streaming and the various forms of wireless interference. Even interference around your self-laid cat-6 wiring should not be excluded.
 

It should not be all that difficult (at least in most cases) to use a combination of both wireless and wired access points to get 16 devices connecting well and transversing a wallboard & stick-frame built home - I’ve truthfully managed to do it here with more Sonos products and with a home that has brick/breeze-block walls, as hopefully my matrix (attached) shows (I’ve just blurred my devices/Mac addresses for security reasons - it’s not a complete matrix (sorry) - I just can’t show all devices on my iPad screen capture, but hopefully it will provide an overall impression for you to perhaps see.

 

I clearly cannot comment on those who may have provided you with advice in the past, except it’s usually the case that Sonos Staff are not responsible for your home network subnet and cannot change your other ‘devices’ settings etc; or position wired, or wireless, access points to get a desired stable network outcome. Relocating ‘other’ home-networked devices ‘out the way’ and on other wireless bands, or subnets, is not something Sonos (or any other company) would do for you. 
 

These things will always come down to yourself (the local system administrator) and it’s for you to achieve a stable networking platform, not Sonos ...such matters are outside their product support remit.
 

No one here can likely confirm if any advice provided to you, has been correctly given, or followed either, at least ‘perhaps’ not without a site visit (to see things in situ) and look at your current setup - Only so much can be achieved via remote access to a site.

 

I can only finish here by stating that on a stable network platform, it’s been my own experience, that small and even large S1/S2 Sonos Systems will work (and do work) absolutely fine. I’m sure that’s not just my own experience either. I have helped to setup several systems for both family and friends and they have not had any issues either. There are also many experienced community users here too, who I’m sure will ‘likely’ confirm that is the case for their own Sonos systems aswell. In fact I understand that some here, run multiple Sonos Households around their homes, either on the same, or different, network subnets without any significant issues like the ones you appear to mention in your posts in both this and some other community threads.

 

I really cannot add much more. I do accept you are (clearly) having issues with your system, but my own thoughts and suggestions are to get someone with a fresh pair of eyes and a reasonable understanding of home networking to perhaps take a close on-site look at your home network setup and maybe seek a different opinion and approach to hopefully help solve your problems. I really do think it will ‘likely’ turn out to be a local network-based issue, rather than something that Sonos may need to resolve.

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To Ken and Rip and any Sonos employees who happen to still read these posts:

Ken, you’ve always been a big help on these forums and it’s really appreciated.  I think though that you keep looking past the fact that many of our systems have been thoroughly gone over by high-level Sonos support teams and even engineers.  THE ONLY REASON I’ve even gone to the trouble (and great expense of funds and TIME) of crawling though attics and basements to run yards of cat6 Ethernet cable is BECAUSE Sonos engineers said this would FIX the WiFi issues with Sonosnet!   NOT BECAUSE I wanted to run wires!   Initially it was just 2 units, then 3, then 6, then 8 and now they suggest perhaps ALL OF THEM! 

Every SINGLE device in our home that is WiFI’d or directly wired to the router WORKS PERFECTLY!  NO device drops, stalls, lags, cuts out, won’t find the router, or take 20-30 seconds to open the associated APP (on any platform). 

I appreciate that you and others on here have a great working system and are long-time and consistent supporters of SONOS, but honestly Sonos knows there are SERIOUS and ongoing issues.

I just wish the fans on here would stop always pointing people to their router settings and blaming WiFi interference as the panacea for all Sonos disruption issues.  I’ve been in Tech long enough to know when all other issues are addressed and the only one left is ONE PRODUCT and manufacturer... they are the PROBLEM, (not my Router and Wifi) and I suspect there are a LARGE number of dissatisfied Sonos customer who have come to the same conclusion.  

I will continue to work with engineering where possible and post their suggestions for others, but it’s becoming crystal clear Sonos has a LOT of work to do for TOO MANY of us. 

Peace. 

RipVanW,

Just to add that my Sonos system is stable and working just fine here and it’s not a huge technical issue to change & ‘fix’ a routers 2.4ghz non-overlapping WiFi channel or it’s channel-width and it’s straightforward to switch the SonosNet channel, if any single Sonos product is wired, which in turn switches all over to STP SonosNet.

I’m fairly sure my young grandson could do those kind of things and reserving/fixing a devices IP address in the routers DHCP table, within the configuration pages, is often just a tick-box too these days, but I know some folk do not like to ‘mess’ with such things. I guess it’s then time to call someone into help… my wife calls that a GALMI - “get a little man in”. (Which is regarded as sexist these days too).
 

Anyhow most, if not all, routers have online user-manuals and there’s even 5 minute YouTube videos showing folk what they need to do - which is basically logging onto a (routers) webpage via a web browser, or App, and change a drop-down Wifi channel list from ‘Auto’ to channel 1 and hit ‘save’ to store the setting.

In kassey22000’s case he had chosen to wire many of his devices, which in some cases, if not thought through, or planned correctly, may sometimes cause loops and network storms and perhaps make matters worse, rather than better. Hence my suggestion was perhaps not to cable some individual devices, but perhaps look at wired access points placed in strategic places in the home that would extend the wireless coverage instead.
 

Personally speaking, I find the SonosNet spanning tree protocol provides more than adequate connection for all my devices and most of the Sonos connection matrix shows green - meaning all the connections are doing fine.🤞

 

Calling on a GALMI though, which can sometimes just be a good mate, or a work colleague etc; is sometimes a good last resort, if you’re unsure about all things involving home ‘networking’ ...and perhaps don’t wish/choose to dabble in/with yourself.

With a good secure, stable network at it’s base, Sonos products will all work really well together.

To Ken_Griffiths and kassey22000:

Your recent posts here give me both shivers and instant heartburn.  My Sonos system is brand new, purchased in the last 30-40 days, and I’ve just recently begun listening to my glorious “whole house” system.  I thought it was just my ignorance or potentially “weak” (it’s not) wifi in my ~2000sf (stick-built) home that was causing all the dropped/disconnected from network issues.  There have been dozens and dozens of times in the past week alone when everything just stops and I have to close out of the app, open it back up, several times, try to force the system to recognize the network again, UGH! 

The sad part is that much of my home is actually already pre-wired, and I could have just stuck with legacy speakers for so much less money.  (I appreciate in advance the Sonos community NOT pointing out how stupid I was to NOT do that...)  I do still have all the Sonos boxes, though...

Your descriptions of what you have both gone through to end up with a “stable” (read “usable”) system are stunningly over-the-top techy, and the idea of hiring a top-end network engineer to come to my house to make my speakers stop dropping off the network is utterly preposterous.  Sonos itself needs to really, truly fix this, or at least offer some restitution to those of us who have been left to deal with their failures.  I’m savvy enough with technology to not give up just yet, but I shouldn’t have to go through these hurdles, especially since from everything I’ve read the old platform worked just fine.

I suppose I will start digging into my network settings using Ken’s descriptions to see if I can create even a moderately more reliable system.  Or, perhaps investigate the return policies of where I bought everything.  I’m not patient enough to have my expensive system keep dropping off the network after an average of about 12 minutes of Pandora streaming.

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Thanks Ken and appreciate the thoughts. 

No stone walls, standard wallboard on stick frame. 

No mesh networks, no neighbor interference as they are too far away.

Extensive testing with Sonos’ top engineers on all other options including router placement, interference (all electronic devices in the home were turned off for 4 hours and the Sonosnet constipation continued - see also Standing Tree issues still not resolved with Sonos products).

Engineering is the group that has confirmed that wiring up MORE if not ALL Sonos components is the only way to address Sonosnet buffering, lag, delays, traffic congestion/sorting issues. 

All Sonos units are within 8 feet of another and no unit is more than 30ft from the router (in the center of the home) so while the units are spread over a 1800sqft house, at least each unit has a neighbor close by. 

Sonos MOVE units (on WiFi of course) work flawlessly, no drops, lag, delay, etc. 

The S2 app is slow to load on ANY device/platform, laggy, and IMHO ugly. 

Many new issues ONLY appeared after S2 introduction and system conversion on my end.  S1 was actually getting pretty solid with few drops in its last year.  

My 1st Sonos purchase was in 2009 and for a number of years there were very few issues, the last 8 have been buggy and since S2 - WRETCHED. 

Sonos Engineer claims “I may be pushing the practical limit of number of Sonos components” - their phrase, not mine! 

Glad some have zero issues with Sonos components but we all know there are thousands who do NOT and while the VAST MAJORITY of them may never reach this community or even bother to complain to Sonos, their poor experiences are ultimately not good for the brand. 

Glad Sonos had a great revenue quarter - now they need to plow that back into the company, not just their personal investment funds. 

 

 

kassey22000,

Not sure of the size of your home, but you would think with 16 Sonos products dotted about the place and running on one of the three fixed non-overlapping SonosNet channels, that you would not need to wire very many devices, if any at all, other than the Sonos Root Bridge device, like a Boost for example  - your walls must be solid stone, I presume🤔?

 

I have a fair few more Sonos devices than yourself (more than half again) and at least 60+ home network devices in total about the place here ... and I try to ensure the SonosNet signal hops ‘kindly’ around my home-setup to provide a virtually green matrix (more, or less) with just one or two lesser-yellow exceptions ..and that’s with the neighbours on either side each running 802.11ac routers with auto-selecting channels, that I personally choose to always keep in view on a regular basis. 

 

Luckily the neighbours mainly use channel 6 on the 2.4ghz band and 36 on their 5ghz band, so these are fairly easy to regularly avoid. 

 

I tend to use channel 11 (mostly) for SonosNet, as neither neighbours router seems to hog that channel.

 

Our walls internally are mostly brick, or breeze-block, with the odd girder/lintel/beam thrown in between floors and above doors etc; and I do seem to manage fairly well with a central-based router to the 4 upstairs and 4 downstairs rooms (not counting shower/toilet/wash rooms). 

 

The central router (also 802.11ac) is set to a ‘fixed’ 2.4ghz channel 1 (20MHz channel-width) and the 5ghz to Channel 44/48 (40MHz channel-width). I also use just one WiFi extender with device blacklisting that mirror-images the main routers credentials, channels and channel-width and that irons-out any black spots for a selected 15 (non-Sonos) local network products. 

 

I do choose to reserve 16 Sonos products in the main routers DHCP reservation table (that’s the max limit for my Netgear router) and for several years I’ve not had any sonos connection issues or other network device issues for that matter and it certainly helps with the regular Sonos updates rebooting the devices too.

 

I opt to put most non-Sonos devices onto the 5ghz band, wherever thats practicable… just to get them well out of the way. I sometimes place them high up in the subnet too when fixing the IP on the device. I find that seems to often help with any full network reboot.


Anyhow back to your issues ...

My thoughts are that your connection issues are likely either the materials in/around your home, network configuration, or router (position, type etc.) ...so those are perhaps the areas where you may wish to concentrate your effort - but there’s not a lot you can do if stone walls, or steel girders etc; are getting in the way and are difficult to avoid, other than perhaps running cables to some carefully chosen areas. I would use multi-access wired/wireless points at the end of those cables, rather than just trying to cable a single device, if that is at all practicable to do. 

 

Router/Network-wise, I would personally avoid mesh-type WiFi hubs that combine the 5ghz/2.4ghz bands and which auto-select (randomly) their channels at each separate hub (like Google WiFi for example) and just carefully position your own network access products to ensure better/best ‘fixed’ connectivity to all rooms and move any identified interfering devices well out the way onto the 5ghz band, or wire those non-Sonos products too.

 

Anyhow, sorry to hear about your network connectivity issues, I hope you manage some day soon, to get it all sorted. It may even pay to shell out some cash and get a reputable on-site network engineer involved to perhaps help solve some of the things for you (after Covid is perhaps done & dusted).

Stay safe too & Happy Holidays.👍

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For me the question is what is an alternative to buying sonos speakers now? I want a distribution system which does not need me to upgrade the actual speakers every few years as that looks like the way its going. Am I better off buying a quality amp and using a different service for distribution?

Tricky isn’t it?

I’m going back to hi-fi. I've been listening to a friend’s hifi recently and I’d forgotten how much better it sounds anyway. Streaming, bluetooth etc are no longer the sole domain of smart speakers. You can get plenty of streaming boxes, bluetooth receivers, active speakers that can make up a hifi system that sounds way better than Sonos ever could. Second-hand amps and speakers are often incredible value.

TBH - no I don’t.  I can invest a bit into the speakers and they will still be producing great sound in 20 years.


“Looking where I’ve got my Sonos right now, it wouldn’t be the end of the world if a few more wires were involved. And do I really need just one controller for the whole house?”

You said it!  8 years with Sonos, 16 components now, (8 were recently upgraded so I could use S2 features) - purchased units almost every year.  Over years of trying to stabilize my system with the help of some high-level Sonos engineers, we’re still forced to WIRE over half of our Sonos components to get even reasonable stability!!  (wireless audio - my arse!)

Indeed I could have wired the same rooms for HiFi speakers had I not bought into the marketing hype Sonos sold all these years. 

Look! S2 is WAY MORE unstable than S1 and even if the fanboys here won’t admit it, many inside Sonos will (anonymously of course).  

I was an I.T. exec for decades, live in small home with no Wi-Fi interference for neighbors (who are far away) who knows more about routers/switches/modems/Wi-Fi than most consumers.

8 years of attempts to isolate Sonos units, Wi-Fi interference, cell phones, on and on! 

Several top end routers, all Cat 6 or better cabling.

Every single aspect (including a detailed network diagram) scrutinized by Sonos engineers year after year! 

100’s of diagnostics submitted, traffic managed, Static IPs assigned, then un-assigned, multiple units Wi-Fi turned off then on then off again. 

Engineers agree, I’ve done EVERYTHING CORRECTLY AND THERE ARE NO ISSUES WITH MY HOME OR SET UP!!!   Their advice, WIRE UP MORE UNITS!!  

FORGET Sonos HD radio!  Unstable b/c of the limitations of even Gen2 Sonos units.  Canceled my subscription after support admitted that it probably won’t get better soon!

And don’t get me started on the horrific management decisions to gut support and software programming staff, while farming out support to off-shore, contracted, companies with uncaring and under-trained staff.  And lastly the brain-dead, poorly managed roll-out of the S2 line! 

Rant off - Have a lovely holiday everyone and STAY SAFE!

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Just like KEF LS50 ?

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For me the question is what is an alternative to buying sonos speakers now? I want a distribution system which does not need me to upgrade the actual speakers every few years as that looks like the way its going. Am I better off buying a quality amp and using a different service for distribution?

Tricky isn’t it?

I’m going back to hi-fi. I've been listening to a friend’s hifi recently and I’d forgotten how much better it sounds anyway. Streaming, bluetooth etc are no longer the sole domain of smart speakers. You can get plenty of streaming boxes, bluetooth receivers, active speakers that can make up a hifi system that sounds way better than Sonos ever could. Second-hand amps and speakers are often incredible value.

Looking where I’ve got my Sonos right now, it wouldn’t be the end of the world if a few more wires were involved. And do I really need just one controller for the whole house? TBH - no I don’t.  I can invest a bit into the speakers and they will still be producing great sound in 20 years.

For me the question is what is an alternative to buying sonos speakers now? I want a distribution system which does not need me to upgrade the actual speakers every few years as that looks like the way its going. Am I better off buying a quality amp and using a different service for distribution?

Bose is making good products. When my old sonos unsupported products become unusable, I will make the switch. I have invested about 4k in Sonos bit no more. 

 

Bose recently abandoned an entire lineup of smart speakers that were less than a decade old design, replacing them with a new Alexa capable lineup that is 100% incompatible with the old.  Even worse, these older model speakers were sold right up until the day they dropped them.  You literally could have bought a speaker one day, and the very next day your speaker was obsolete; incapable of working with any future Bose devices.  

So, good luck with Bose.  

So what is the user experience if I have a mixture of new and old equipment which is going to be the majority of us for some time.  Do I have to use one app for the S1 equipment and then the newer S2 for the newer equipment?  How do I sync playing music across that ecosystem?  Thanks

Bose is making good products. When my old sonos unsupported products become unusable, I will make the switch. I have invested about 4k in Sonos bit no more. 

Ok, but do the diagnostics work, if you cannot connect to the sonos system? Presummably if it can't find anything, the diagnostics can't work.  I can run everything else off my wi-fi.  On the google play app store comments, there seem to be lots of people with the issue with sonos 2.

Unlikely. There’s a significantly larger possibility that your issues are with the local network. You may want to open a new thread with details and perhaps a diagnostic, and someone may be able to assist you. 

I seem to have loads more connectivity issues since the new app, is it possibly connected to the app "upgrade"?  If so is an improvement coming?

Ken to be fair to the poster, he didn’t ask for assistance but was simply posting the experience he (and many, many others) has had in attempting to upgrade. The fact that he needs to resort to “folk here willing to assist” or giving Sonos a call indicates that Sonos should have made their update process a lot more straightforward than they have done.

I didn’t personally experience any issues updating to S2, nor did my son, son-in-law or his relatives either, so I was just thinking that I (or possibly others here) might just be able to assist that’s all.👍

 

Ken to be fair to the poster, he didn’t ask for assistance but was simply posting the experience he (and many, many others) has had in attempting to upgrade. The fact that he needs to resort to “folk here willing to assist” or giving Sonos a call indicates that Sonos should have made their update process a lot more straightforward than they have done.

System was working fine, downloaded the S2 app and Now cannot connect anything and S1 now doesn’t recognise products that are plugged into router… not a great experience

Sorry, but there is not anywhere near enough detail in your post to even make a suggestion, other than to perhaps try a network and device reboot.

If you can’t figure out how to undertake the update to S2, then you could perhaps detail your setup and what you did and what you have already tried, otherwise I can’t see anyone ‘remote’ being able to suggest where you may need to go next to get things working.
 

Plenty of folk here willing to assist, I’m sure, but you need to explain things in far greater detail, or maybe give Sonos a call.

System was working fine, downloaded the S2 app and Now cannot connect anything and S1 now doesn’t recognise products that are plugged into router… not a great experience

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