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Sonos Sub has died - PCB board component responsible found - Assistance required

  • 20 April 2023
  • 7 replies
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Hi, My Sonos black Sub has died - after opening up the unit, taking out the pcb board and inspecting and testing components, the responsible pcb board component that has failed has been located. Is there someone who has disassembled their sub before, please share the details and/or a clear photo of the component labelled as R 37 on the Main PCB board please so I can source a replacement. 
 

Thanks in advance Sonos Community crew.
 

Lenny K

 

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Best answer by LennyK 21 April 2023, 03:53

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7 replies

This component has not ‘died’, it was killed after another component failed. Unless you identify the killer, a replacement R37 will be killed too. The nearby D7 and D8 look a little dark to me. Be sure to visually check the large capacitors for signs of damage. I’d also check them for shorts.

Thanks for your response. I did visually check all of the large capacitors as well as all of the other components as I scanned the board visually trying to locate any parts that were damaged when the fault occurred but so far have only been able to identify that one component at this stage. My next step is to have a friend go over the board and test each component to hopefully locate any other and/or source of the subsequent failure of the unit. 

Update: I have also ascertained that the two other black components next to the R37 are also cooked aswell. 
 

If anyone can assist with the numbers marked on these components from either a schematic diagram or from an image of their own circuit board it would be much appreciated. 

R37 is 810, you can see it in a tear down video on yt. I replaced mine and it bursted into flames too after powering on, so the problem is elsewhere. Did you make any progress?

Hi Mic Marlow,

                          I actually havnet been able to make any progress whatsoever because I hadnt had any new responses to my callout except for yours now.  R37 is not the only dead component there, the two larger black spots are also components that got cooked at the time of the failure of my unit.

I still need to find out what those other two components are aswell before I can move forward with the diagnosis and subsequent attempt at repairs and a rebirth of the sub.

Can you also identify those other two components for me by any chance please?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Ken

@LennyK 

2F K and Y2 X

I didn’t check mine for shorts yet, at least they are not burned.

 

 

FYI: There are reference schematics for the 5001 controller: 

https://www.ti.com/lit/an/slva034a/slva034a.pdf?ts=1686072000925&ref_url=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.google.com%252F

 

My sub failed this week with the exact failure. I haven’t gone through and checked all the components, but R37 is definitely toast. Curious if anyone had success fixing this or root-causing.

I’m assuming the TI5001C powers the lower voltage logic board. Does anyone know what the input and output voltage is set to under normal operation? 

Other teardowns show that the output voltage of the AC-DC is 52V. The TI5001C is only rated for 40V max input, so I’m assuming there must be another step down between The AC-DC and the SMPS.