Question

Hooking Up Turntable


I’ve seen there are a few ways to hook up an analog stereo to Sonos speakers. I have a few pieces of kit going into a graphic equalizer and the EQ goes out to my current amplifier.

What’s the best device for connecting all that to the Sonos? I’d guess the EQ can output directly to a Sonos Amp. That’s a lot of money. Are there other more economical options?

I guess

  1. What’s the best
  2. What’s the most cost-efficient
  3. And what are the trade-offs between the two?

10 replies

Userlevel 7
Badge +22

Amp if you want to directly drive passive speakers. Port if you want a line-level signal.

Sonos offers Line-In connections on the Five, ERAs and the mobile speakers.

 

I don’t understand your answer.

I have Sonos speakers, the only inputs are power and CAT 5.

Userlevel 5
Badge +12

There are a limited number of Sonos products that connect to external systems.

The amp, five, era 100, era 300, move 2, and port all provide a line input (the eras need a special adapter). The roam, move, and eras also offer Bluetooth input. Once the signal is in the sonos ecosystem it can be played on any sonos device.

The port also provides an output that can be fed into a traditional hifi system.

The cheapest route for a wired line in would be an era 100. The rest is really personal preference, if you would like the best speaker then the five is the route to go, if you want to drive traditional passive speakers then it is the amp and so on.

 

 

Userlevel 4
Badge +8

Don’t do it. I have a “Connect” that… doesn’t.

Sometimes it plays only the left channel. Sometimes only the right. Sometimes it converts everything to mono without telling you! And, a significant portion of the time, it doesn’t play at all.

It’s so very, very frustrating. I had a Yamaha Music Cast amp that streamed internet radio well and hard-wired my TT and CD. But I had to run speaker wire. I bought Sonos to get rid of the speaker wire.

And when it acted up, you know what the tech line had the gall to tell me! Run a CAT5 cable to your speakers! For a WIRELESS system!!! LOLZ all the way - until I realized how much I spent.

Don’t do it.

Userlevel 5
Badge +12

@Alonzo Mosley my three connects work fine. It might be worth running a diagnostics immediately after you have a problem and then getting in touch with support telling them the number. They may be able to spot an issue that can be fixed.

(Response time might be a bit slow right now though)

Userlevel 4
Badge +8

Many hours of calls. Every time i’s a different excuse. I’ve upgraded my ISP, my router, I’ve wired my wireless…. all for naught. It’s a 1300 sf apartment and the Connect has a direct line of sight to the router. One of two Play 3’s is plugged into the router. I rarely can listen to an entire album without one chnnel cutting out.

Lately I can’t even get five minutes of music.

Don’t buy it.

Is this an S1 or S2 system?

Consider the possibility that there is a hardware failure. As a test make sure that the PLAY:3’s are not bonded as a stereo pair and experiment with powering down one unit at a time. Also experiment with moving and eliminating the wired connection.

Userlevel 4
Badge +8

Obviously it’s a hardware failure.

And why would I unpair the stereo? That’s the whole point.

I have spent probably a hundred hours - and thousands of dollars buying new things recommended by Sonos troubleshooters. I’m not going to relitigate it here.

Just telling the poor OP thinking about buying it that he’s in for a world of hurt.

I’m suggesting this as a test. With the PLAY3:s paired, interpreting the results is more difficult. After the test you can pair them again.

Userlevel 7

I’ve seen there are a few ways to hook up an analog stereo to Sonos speakers. I have a few pieces of kit going into a graphic equalizer and the EQ goes out to my current amplifier.

What’s the best device for connecting all that to the Sonos? I’d guess the EQ can output directly to a Sonos Amp. That’s a lot of money. Are there other more economical options?

I guess

  1. What’s the best
  2. What’s the most cost-efficient
  3. And what are the trade-offs between the two?

Hi

I don’t know if you received a definite answer to your question and it appears your post was hi-jacked (meaning the subject was changed by another members question).

It’s not so must about….

  1. What’s the best
  2. What’s the most cost-efficient
  3. And what are the trade-offs between the two?

But rather what can you actually do to incorporate your analog system into Sonos.

You mentioned you have a few pieces of Kit connected to an EQ that runs into an Amp with I assume you have wired speakers as output. You didn’t indicate what are the pieces of Kit that are run through the EQ? Be that as it may I can only speculate.

If the Amp has an RCA output your option is a Sonos Port using its RCA input. You can then group it (Sonos Port) to your other Sonos speakers to hear whatever source is being sent through the EQ > Amp. The only draw back is that you may have a slight delay between the speakers wired to the Amp and Sonos speaks which can create an “echo” effect if Sonos speakers are in the same room as the speakers wired to the Amp.

To avoid any type of delay that might create an echo effect you’d do the following

  1. Ditch the EQ and Amp
  2. Purchase a Sonos Amp
  3. Purchase RCA component selector (switch) similar to this  (*)

             (*) Also may require and optical to RCA converter like this  (depending upon your Kit) to bridge to the RCA component selector switch above

  1. Connect the RCA component selector Output to the Sonos Amp RCA Input
  2. Wire your passive speakers to the Sonos Amp
  3. Setup Line-in for Sonos Amp
  4. Select your source Kit and start audio
  5. Group Sonos Amp to other Sonos speakers (**)

              (**) The process also works in reverse.

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