Question

What is the low-end frequency response of the play 5?

  • 16 May 2014
  • 5 replies
  • 10158 views

I have a play:3 and love the software, but the frequency response is too narrow. I am looking for a new sonos unit with a wider range--I don't necessarily need more power. I understand you've made a business decision to not publish these specs, nor have I been able to find them on 3rd party sites. Can you give me a hint: will the play:5 give me something south of 40Hz, or do I have to purchase the sub for this? BTW, I noticed you published the low end spec for the sub (25Hz). P.S. the lack of published basic performance specs is really irritating for audiophiles and engineers (unfortunately, I'm both). Again, kudos for the software--it's the best.

5 replies

Userlevel 7
Badge +25
Hi User705462,

You're correct, we don't post those specifics. We've found that in most cases with multiple, independently amplified speakers all contained in one unit a simple frequency measurement isn't going to give you a very good idea on how it sounds. We encourage everyone to listen for themselves and make their minds up.

We offer a 45 day money back guaranty for all units purchased through our store so you can test it out in your home. You can also look for a demo at a reseller near you.

If you're looking to get the very low range and really rock the house, the SUB is the way to go. It can be paired with all of our amplified units (not the CONNECT). 

Thanks
Userlevel 7
Badge +22
if your looking for low-low's I don't think a Play:5 will satisfy you.  I would recommend either adding a Sonos:Sub to your system or utilizing a Sonos Connect:Amp with speakers/sub of your choice.

Are you near a Target Store - they usually have Play:5's on display and you can test difference between 3 and 5.

The Play:5 does have a good bit more bass than a 3 though. 
if your looking for low-low's I don't think a Play:5 will satisfy you. 
Thanks for the responses!
I agree with User705462 about not posting basic specifications. Almost all audio companies list a frequency range, which enables us audiophiles to do some culling of speakers PRIOR to purchase. Are you recommending I purchase a Sonos system (with a couple of Play 5s) to take home to see if it sounds like the best frequency range noted in my spreadsheet (26Hz-30kHz)? (I'm one of those who believes 20Hz-30kHz impacts the sound even though I can't 'hear' those frequencies.) I know that wireless can't reproduce the frequency range that wired can, but providing a general range would be useful. I'm guessing 50Hz-20kHz? Many thanks.
Userlevel 7
Badge +25
I agree with User705462 about not posting basic specifications. Almost all audio companies list a frequency range, which enables us audiophiles to do some culling of speakers PRIOR to purchase. Are you recommending I purchase a Sonos system (with a couple of Play 5s) to take home to see if it sounds like the best frequency range noted in my spreadsheet (26Hz-30kHz)? (I'm one of those who believes 20Hz-30kHz impacts the sound even though I can't 'hear' those frequencies.) I know that wireless can't reproduce the frequency range that wired can, but providing a general range would be useful. I'm guessing 50Hz-20kHz? Many thanks.
Hi Tod,

We'd recommend just that, if you're interested in the system and want know how it'll sound, test it at home. Each speaker is going to sound differently between your home, a showroom, test room, or any other test location.

If you're looking for the extreme low end to be covered, as Chris suggested, just a PLAY:5 might not have deep enough bass, which is why we have the SUB.

The wireless signal passed between players is a digital signal, not analog, so there is no quality lost in transfer at all. Each player is using it's own DAC timed perfectly using our software to be in sync. 

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