Is Sonos being used in schools anywhere? Are there any issues with the hardware sitting on non residential wireless networks.


Question about commercial/education establishment use of Sonos.

8 replies

Thanks Chris - one more question - is it possible to password protect a Sonos system. So that if you are on the same wifi network with a sonos enabled tablet/phone, you need to enter a code or password to be able to control the Sonos devices?
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No. You can't password protect sonos
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Something that should be mentioned about Sonos devices, especially in any large or enterprise network environment that is using managed switches with Sonos devices wired to the network... Sonos devices are in fact bridged devices. They utilize spanning tree and send out Bridging Packet Data Units (BPDUs). Many enterprise managed switch environments will be set up to block ports that BPDUs are received on to prevent possible network issues. Also, the Spanning Tree settings required by Sonos are different (legacy) compared to the spanning tree settings that are used on most newer/modern managed switches, especially with the advent of Rapid Spanning Tree.

If the Sonos device(s) are connected to an existing WiFi network, spanning tree won't apply. However, the network being connected to needs to not have any kind of authentication (802.1x, EAP, PEAP, LEAP, etc.) configured, and cannot require a login page either. A standard WPA or WPA2 password for the network is fine though.

If these might apply to you and you would like more information, please reply here and I'll be happy to provide more info.
It would be completely impossible to have sonos in a school environment without installing (and of course paying for) a completely secure separate wifi system because of the lack of password protection or restricted access. Another example of this ridiculous feature absence presenting a major problem.
It would be completely impossible to have sonos in a school environment without installing (and of course paying for) a completely secure separate wifi system because of the lack of password protection or restricted access. Another example of this ridiculous feature absence presenting a major problem.

It's not ridiculous, it was designed for a home environment and was never intended for use in an environment such a school, there are plenty of commercial audio systems that would be better suited for use in a school, buy the right tool for the job, don't try to use a product for something it was never designed for and then say it's ridiculous it doesn't work.
It would be completely impossible to have sonos in a school environment without installing (and of course paying for) a completely secure separate wifi system because of the lack of password protection or restricted access. Another example of this ridiculous feature absence presenting a major problem.

It's not ridiculous, it was designed for a home environment and was never intended for use in an environment such a school, there are plenty of commercial audio systems that would be better suited for use in a school, buy the right tool for the job, don't try to use a product for something it was never designed for and then say it's ridiculous it doesn't work.


My apologies - I wasn't quite clear. I think the absence of zone controls or some kind of access restriction is ridiculous for many other (domestic) reasons, but absolutely right that it's not designed for schools etc, so this isn't one of them.
Something that should be mentioned about Sonos devices, especially in any large or enterprise network environment that is using managed switches with Sonos devices wired to the network... Sonos devices are in fact bridged devices. They utilize spanning tree and send out Bridging Packet Data Units (BPDUs). Many enterprise managed switch environments will be set up to block ports that BPDUs are received on to prevent possible network issues. Also, the Spanning Tree settings required by Sonos are different (legacy) compared to the spanning tree settings that are used on most newer/modern managed switches, especially with the advent of Rapid Spanning Tree.

If the Sonos device(s) are connected to an existing WiFi network, spanning tree won't apply. However, the network being connected to needs to not have any kind of authentication (802.1x, EAP, PEAP, LEAP, etc.) configured, and cannot require a login page either. A standard WPA or WPA2 password for the network is fine though.

If these might apply to you and you would like more information, please reply here and I'll be happy to provide more info.


MikeV, if you have more info regarding integrating Sonos in a commercial network environment, I'm all ears!
I'm quoting an out-of-state job that I'd like to use Sonos for, but seeing as how I'd be walking into an unfamiliar network, it'd be nice to have some kind of contingency plan if things go sideways. Do you have any fixes/workarounds that have been implemented successfully in these situations? I'd like to forward some stuff to the client's IT director and see if we can make this work. Thanks!

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