Question

Ethernet Powerlines with Sonos, reliable?

  • 6 September 2019
  • 13 replies
  • 161 views

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Hi guys

I currently have a dedicated SONOS bridge plugged into my router in order to utilise SONOSNET rather than my own Wi-Fi. In the same room i also have a Play:5 but it is not within reach of the router for me to run an Ethernet cable. It would be handy to get rid of the bridge if possible (less boxes, power sockets used etc). I already have a couple of Devolo Ethernet 500Mbps powerlines and could use these in order to connect the Play:5 into the router as use this as the bridge for SONOSNET.

Does anybody have any issues using powerlines with SONOS kit? I have seen a thread where SONOS don't recommend it.

I appreciate that i could just drop all the speakers on my Wi-Fi but i have found SONOSNET to be very reliable and would rather maintain this setup if possible. If the powerlines are not recommended or cause issues then i can maintain the existing bridge but just wondered. I may just try it anyway and see if i have any issues but wanted some opinions or experience first.

Thanks

13 replies

Userlevel 7
Badge +20
I have powerline adaptors deployed in a couple of places, and they're trouble-free for me. Your experience will depend on factors including the quality of your electrical wiring and how much electrical noise it's subject to. If you have the kit already, you should just try it.
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I have powerline adaptors deployed in a couple of places, and they're trouble-free for me. Your experience will depend on factors including the quality of your electrical wiring and how much electrical noise it's subject to. If you have the kit already, you should just try it.

Thanks for the reply, good to know your aren't having issues with them.

Is there any benefit or disadvantage from using the Play:5 as the SONOSNET "anchor" rather than a dedicated bridge device?
Userlevel 7
Badge +19
I use them for my Garden room which is just out of reach of the house wifi. In general they are OK. I am running mixed mode on my Sonos, which is not advised, but it works well. I get the odd failed update but a quick power cycle of the Poweline connected Sonos devices normally sorts it.

I do find the Poweline adapters need re-booting at least once a month, annoyingly it is the one in the house that normally needs powercycling. Also don't go for anything over 1000mps as they are less reliable.

I have bought a long CAT 5 cable to connect this room up as long term i want better reliability and powerline seems a messy solution.
Devolo 500 powerline adapters between either side of a room ought to be fine. The chances are the sockets will be on the same circuit from the consumer unit, and therefore that the inter-adapter electrical wiring distance will be short. With Devolos you can always run the Cockpit software to check how they're doing.

Also, this is only being used from the router to the Sonos system. It's when powerline is used between Sonos players (especially if grouped) that the occasional latency spike can cause problems.

Using the Play:5/gen2 as the sole wired device should also be okay, and definitely better than a Bridge. It has similar wireless tech to the Boost.
Badge +2
Devolo 500 powerline adapters between either side of a room ought to be fine. The chances are the sockets will be on the same circuit from the consumer unit, and therefore that the inter-adapter electrical wiring distance will be short. With Devolos you can always run the Cockpit software to check how they're doing.

Also, this is only being used from the router to the Sonos system. It's when powerline is used between Sonos players (especially if grouped) that the occasional latency spike can cause problems.

Using the Play:5/gen2 as the sole wired device should also be okay, and definitely better than a Bridge. It has similar wireless tech to the Boost.


Cheers ratty, seems like you are the Sonos guru for all my questions!
Badge +2
Devolo 500 powerline adapters between either side of a room ought to be fine. The chances are the sockets will be on the same circuit from the consumer unit, and therefore that the inter-adapter electrical wiring distance will be short. With Devolos you can always run the Cockpit software to check how they're doing.

Also, this is only being used from the router to the Sonos system. It's when powerline is used between Sonos players (especially if grouped) that the occasional latency spike can cause problems.

Using the Play:5/gen2 as the sole wired device should also be okay, and definitely better than a Bridge. It has similar wireless tech to the Boost.


ratty, if i have to use some sort of bridge would i be better using my Sonos Connect rather than the older bridge? Is there a difference between them i.e wireless ability, SONOSNET version etc.

Thanks
Bridge is the old SonosNet 1.0. Anything released in recent years has been SonosNet 2.0, including Connect and Play:5. SonosNet 2.0 has better range and resilience.

If you don't want to use the powerline connection you can wire whatever you wish in place of the Bridge.
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Bridge is the old SonosNet 1.0. Anything released in recent years has been SonosNet 2.0, including Connect and Play:5. SonosNet 2.0 has better range and resilience.

If you don't want to use the powerline connection you can wire whatever you wish in place of the Bridge.


Nice one, cheers.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
It might be worth looking at swapping the Bridge for a Boost and skipping the powerline stuff. Not too expensive and you know it will work.
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It might be worth looking at swapping the Bridge for a Boost and skipping the powerline stuff. Not too expensive and you know it will work.

Thanks for the reply. To be honest i have not bothered with the powerlines yet. I have just left the Bridge in for now and it is working really well with no issues so think i will leave it as is for now. The Connect can also be used just as a bridge but it shows up as another speaker which is a little bit annoying. All my other devices are playing fine with the bridge too so seems fine. Sonos support say there won't be a performance difference between SONOSNET 1 and 2 either.
Sonos support say there won't be a performance difference between SONOSNET 1 and 2 either.
A strange statement, unless they're just talking about max bandwidth. Otherwise why develop, and tout, SonosNet 2.0 at all? Back when it first appeared there was a FAQ illustrating the increased range of 2.0. And why develop the Boost back in 2014 and promote it as having significantly better RF performance?

I really do wonder about the quality of some advice from Support these days...
Badge +2

Sonos support say there won't be a performance difference between SONOSNET 1 and 2 either.A strange statement, unless they're just talking about max bandwidth. Otherwise why develop, and tout, SonosNet 2.0 at all? Back when it first appeared there was a FAQ illustrating the increased range of 2.0. And why develop the Boost back in 2014 and promote it as having significantly better RF performance?

I really do wonder about the quality of some advice from Support these days...


Yeah i did wonder that. My wireless network is very strong at home so normally i wouldn't bother with SONOSNET. However as i now use Google Wi-Fi MESH, the controller app won't always connect, i am assuming because of the client and band steering? I could be wrong but it seemed a little unreliable.
However as i now use Google Wi-Fi MESH, the controller app won't always connect, i am assuming because of the client and band steering? I could be wrong but it seemed a little unreliable.
A multi-node Google mesh contains a router. Since that splits the local network, Sonos won't work across it. In other words all the Sonos components -- players and controllers -- have to be either 'upstream' or 'downstream' of the primary Google node.

Also, Google WiFi autoselects channels. It's possible therefore that it could pick one which clashes with SonosNet.

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