Discontinuing service and software updates for older Sonos speakers?



Show first post

42 replies

I have 1 play 5 (1st gen), 1 play 3, 2 connect:amp , 1 sonos one, 1 bridge and the playbar. I really enjoy the ecosystem, but it is not an option to start replacing units every year [...]
The Play:5 (1st gen) was discontinued about two years ago nonetheless it's still supplied with firmware updates and upgrades. Sorry, I don't get your point.


I was not happy with the controller phase out. Not providing the expect updates to keep it running was really not smart, but considering that people have free app solution to continue running the system, ok. But to discontinue one speaker and forcing me to purchase a new speaker to keep the ecosystem that might be discontinued shortly as well ? I will probably find new market solutions that are less expensive


"Finding market solutions that are less expensive" is going to be difficult. Here's the competition:

Bose: 4th full product line revamp in 5 years, with significant compatibility problems between the lines. Slightly more expensive.
Denon: 3rd full product line revamp in 4 years, sued by Sonos for patent infringement.
Bluesound: Significantly more expensive.
Yamaha: Failed at multi-room music 3 times already.
Samsung/LG/etc.: Not even denting the market.

Meanwhile, Sonos has been in business since 2002, with products released in 2005, of which only the CR100 is not supported. They have never had a revamp of the entire line that had significant compatibility issues with older units, a brand new Sonos One or Beam can be grouped with an original ZP100 and play every source Sonos has. This cannot be said for Bose et al.

For example, Alexa and other cloud based voice control is backwards compatible to nearly 14 year old devices. It is only Airplay functionality that has been added to recent items and not to older devices due to hardware issues (and yet you can still group the older units in and play an Airplay 2 source). Can you name one brand new digital technology that is backwards compatible to 14 year old devices?
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
Because of this statement, I am really analyzing carefully my next steps.


Always smart to do that when consideingr a purchase that you hope to last a long time.


But to discontinue one speaker and forcing me to purchase a new speaker to keep the ecosystem that might be discontinued shortly as well ?


Sonos has not don anything remotely similar to this in their entire history. Other companies have done similar, but not Sonos. Isn't jumping the gun a little bit to suggest that this is now the new MO?
Userlevel 7
The OP (and others) should understand that just because a product will no longer receive updates or direct support does not mean it will no longer function. For example the Playbar, Play 1, Play 3 will not natively accept Alexa voice commands nor are they natively capable of Airplay 2. However, I can command Alexa via a SonosOne to play music on a Playbar.

I'm not a Sonos employee so I don't have knowledge of what is to come. However, the only Sonos speaker I see on the endangered species list (i.e. no longer produced) is the Play 1 as The Sonos One is a logical successor. Therefore spending the extra $50-USD to me is worth it to future proof my Sonos system. The Play 3 is questionable; but still offers some advantages over a Sonos One. The Playbar IMO is the only Sonos speaker without a clear successor (to date) because of placement versatility versus the Playbase and sonic capacities versus the Beam.

The Gen1 Play 5 had to be replaced with the Gen2 Play 5 otherwise Sonos would have fell behind the curve to offer a sonically competitive product versus other wireless (and wired) speakers.

Finally, everything reaches EOL cycle but it doesn't mean they should be tossed. I just resurrected (after 8 years in storage) a Sony DA777ES receiver (with no HDMI capabilities) to run a set of Definitive B5 bi-polar speakers and a end-table size Definitive Sub so I could incorporate a Sonos Connect. I'll probably opt for the new Sonos Amp when released in February 2019; but for now the Sony DA777ES is the go to solution.

Cheers!
Userlevel 7
Badge +21

I'm not a Sonos employee so I don't have knowledge of what is to come. However, the only Sonos speaker I see on the endangered species list (i.e. no longer produced) is the Play 1 as The Sonos One is a logical successor. Therefore spending the extra $50-USD to me is worth it to future proof my Sonos system. The Play 3 is questionable; but still offers some advantages over a Sonos One. The Playbar IMO is the only Sonos speaker without a clear successor (to date) because of placement versatility versus the Playbase and sonic capacities versus the Beam.


Actually, the Connect:amp appears to be the next product to no longer be for sale. From Ryan on the Sonos amp intor thread:

With the introduction of the new Sonos Amp, we will no longer be selling the Connect:Amp. We will continue to support Connect:Amp through ongoing software updates as part of the Sonos system for the many people who already have one at home.

It does look the play:3 is on longer being sold as well since it's not available at many locations. The play:1 seems to be surviving since it's still available a year after the Sonos One was release. I can see where it still has a place in the ecosystem for those who have no desire for voice control and/or in use as surround speakers
Userlevel 7
Actually, the Connect:amp appears to be the next product to no longer be for sale. From Ryan on the Sonos amp intor thread:
It does look the play:3 is on longer being sold as well since it's not available at many locations. The play:1 seems to be surviving since it's still available a year after the Sonos One was release. I can see where it still has a place in the ecosystem for those who have no desire for voice control and/or in use as surround speakers


I agree about the Connect:AMP being 86'd. However, I was more focused on actual Sonos speakers. It's a Sonos call...but the Play 3 (sonic capacities aside vs. the Sonos One) IMO has some worth regarding positioning. I'd prefer to see a successor for it mush in the same way as the Play 5 (Gen1 to Gen2). A smaller speaker (vs. Play 5) with good punch for horizontal and vertical positioning is still a good idea.

I replaced my Play 1's x 4 (sold em' on ebay @ $145 each before they were officially discounted) with Sonos One's as I can just turn of the Alexa microphone. However, that was a personal decision as I suspected Sonos (and retailers) would discount them after the launch of the One)

Cheers!
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
The Play 1 is cheaper to use as a surround speaker, lowering the cost of a 5.1 system a bit so it may hang around.

As much as I love my Play 3 pair if I was shopping today I'd be hard pressed to justify the cost over paired Play 1s on the basis of the sound delivered.
Userlevel 1
Badge
As someone said, Play 5 1st gen was discontinued for new sales. Updates are of course being provided. I have one.

The point is simple. If updates that are required to play (therefore use it) stops to be provided that will be unacceptable in my point of view.

The sonos controller is an example. If I wanted to keep using it, I would be forced to do not update all other units. There was no option to keep the controller and using updated speakers.

By the way, I don't remember any sound system, player, laptop, cellphone that was forced to stop doing what it was designed to do.

I have an old Nokia cellphone that still make calls , I have an old laptop that still turns on, play music, access internet and do all the things that I had when I purchased it. (Both are not used anymore because I decided to move on to have new features and power capacity)

And finally, I have speakers that I earned from my parents that have more than 30 years that I still use it plugged now in my connect:amp

I am not saying that it will be the future of Sonos, but if so, having units that are not able to stream because they decided so, it will be a breakthrough for me.

Alexa is fancy, voice control is nice , but I bought it to play music all of them together . If updates are required to keep it like this for 30 , 50 years, I do expect to have it.

By the way, I have the first iPod for example and it still plays very well.
Userlevel 1
Badge
If it is to move on, I will really appreciate that it is because I decided. Based on new powerful and well developed Sonos products, as I did when I left out my old sound bar (with subwoofer) and purchased the Sonos playbar .

Or when I put aside my sound system and purchased my first connect:amp
Sonos is not a speaker, so expecting it to be like a speaker is nonsense. Sonos is an integrated multi-room music streamer, with significant reliance on an external ecosystem which includes things like cloud services, streaming services, voice services, etc. To expect 13+ year old technology to operate within this ecosystem in perpetuity is not only unrealistic, it is foolish. To expect it to be like the old pair of Advents you bought back in 1972 is downright absurd.

Furthermore, to expect Sonos to continually support every software/firmware release which occurs prior to an older unit no longer being supported is also unrealistic. Sonos is a for profit company, and how much profit is to be made if they waste manpower on a configuration which will eventually lose most if not all functionality, for a forever dwindling user base, who by definition will never buy another Sonos device? Answer: Not much.
I have a gen 1 Sonos 5 and 1. They are paperweights! I only have access to Verizon Elipsis Jetpack wifi and Sonos does not support the use of the Elipsis Jetpack with its gen 1 speakers. The Jetpack has no cat 5 plug so the speakers cannot be setup. sol
Userlevel 7
Badge +17
You could use a laptop and cat5 from that to a sonos Ethernet port to set them up.
Actually a mobile phone is now the preferred option to set sonos up easily, no firewalls etc etc..


The problem for those of us using speakers with online services such as Spotify probably means once API changes are made by the service provider, we'll almost certainly be shut out from using those services with our older Sonos speakers.

There's nothing particularly shocking about this.
Really? I don't expect old kit to do all that newer kit will do, but I do expect it to continue to do all the things that it currently does...
This is one of the downsides of these speaker systems. Sonos are not going to keep supporting older devices forever. Once features break such as Spotify integration, that's it.

Of course it's not without risk for Sonos. Once we start getting cut off, some of us will evaluate whether we want to stay in the Sonos ecosystem. I certainly won't be adding to my Sonos setup with new speakers until I know what Sonos plans are for handling this.



I just wanted you to know I completely agree with you and have ran into some of the same problems. Sonos is constantly preventing older devices and operating systems from controlling their speakers. They claim it's the OS and device manufacturers fault but that doesn't fly when one day the app is working fine and the next not working at all because of a speaker firmware update. There needs to be a simple way to prevent updates to both the speakers' firmware as well as the apps on any device being used to control the speakers. While there is an option to prevent updates under the Android OS there seems to be no option in the Windows 7 version of the app to do the same so there is no way to avoid the prompts to upgrade the app or firmware using a Windows laptop. They need to leave well enough alone but I suspect they are probably patching more security flaws in the version of Linux or whatever other OS the speakers are using internally more than they are adding features, however they will likely never admit it. They are pursuing a one size fits all strategy that is likely to end in their demise.

Reply