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Potential Buyer - researching purchase!



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Userlevel 7
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if you find you experience audio dropouts or connection issues using Sonos with your existing wifi then is the time to either invest in a Sonos Bridge (very cheap on ebay) or Boost or, if your layout permits, just hardwire one of your new components to your router. You will then switch to 'Sonosnet' mesh network rather than the 'hub and spoke' method of normal wifi which is way more robust.
Another question as I've now moved from potential buyer to customer. I have assumed I do not need a bridge with the gen 2 play 5 and play 1? Just plug n play with each unit?

As stated by others, you don't need a Boost, you can go with a straight WiFi setup. But there are advantages to a "Boost Setup" (man I hate that term) or (more properly) a Sonosnet setup, by wiring at least one Sonos player or a Boost. Sonosnet gives you two very important things: 1) A network dedicated to Sonos streaming, that you can put on its own channel separate from your home WiFi and 2) A mesh network that lets every Sonos box talk to every other Sonos box, instead of having to go "Spoke and Hub" style back to the router. In other words, Sonosnet gives you less interference from your WiFi, so anybody streaming HD video or downloading huge files won't interrupt your music, and it gives you greater range and more reliability due to the mesh.

Also important to note is Sonosnet setup used to be the only way to connect, there was no "Standard" or WiFi setup. However, when competitors came out with a WiFi setup, they used it as a check box that Sonos needed a wired component and they didn't, even though their method was far inferior to Sonos' mesh. So Sonos created "Standard" setup (Even though the original "standard setup" was Sonosnet. Sonos has some missteps on terminology, in case you haven't noticed ;)).

In any case, the preferred setup will always be wiring at least one unit to activate the separate mesh network. If none of your players are near the router or an Ethernet connection, a Boost (or a Bridge on e-bay) is the way to go.
Userlevel 1
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OK thanks for the advice. Does the hard wired device need to be permanently connected or is it a one time set up? I don't want to waste a play 1 in my hallway
Userlevel 1
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Oh, and it's a BT hub 5 router. If that makes any difference?
Userlevel 7
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If you start off by connecting one of the Plays to the router by wire then the units will connect to each other using the SonosNet and you won't have told Sonos your Wi-Fi credentials - So if you unplug the wired unit then Sonos won't be able to connect to your Wi-Fi. You would just then have to select the network for Sonos to connect and enter your password
A bridge/boost is never a bad idea. SonosNet allows you to be independent of your wifi and all the video streaming, app updating and game playing that other family members may be bogging it down with. It's well worth the additional expense.
Userlevel 7
Badge +17
I've bought four to start with. 2 X play 5 and 2x play 1. That's the lounge, bedroom, and my office covered as I don't mind moving the 1s about. That's £1100 which is about half the cost of just the hegel amp, and less than what I sold it for. But I see your point!

would be great to hear how you're getting on with your new toys
Userlevel 1
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Haven't got them yet. I ordered a boost as well since we use lots of other streaming devices, and drop outs are unacceptable to my ears.
Userlevel 4
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This is a good thread. I like it when there is lots of good questions followed by good advice!

Only one thing - you can link an audiophile system with Sonos using the Connect. So if you ever do get a hankering to spend large amounts of money on audiophile stuff again, you can integrate the Sonos system with it to include it in a multiroom multi source system.
Userlevel 1
Badge +4
This is a good thread. I like it when there is lots of good questions followed by good advice!

Only one thing - you can link an audiophile system with Sonos using the Connect. So if you ever do get a hankering to spend large amounts of money on audiophile stuff again, you can integrate the Sonos system with it to include it in a multiroom multi source system.


IF I did, it would be Devialet Phantoms. It's obvious (for me) that the solution is portability. I was never convinced much by stereo imaging, I'm more a timing and harmony listener and since my music is mostly manipulated in a studio then locating the precise location of a musician is irrelevant. I'm too fidgety to sit in one sweet spot for very long, and given my room acoustics issue was becoming increasingly disappointing anyway.

The one thing I will miss is the ability to make a drum kit sound like a real drum kit in my lounge, in terms of sound pressure level and dynamic response, but does that contribute to the musical enjoyment? Probably not. I have to say though that of all the speakers I have listened to over the years, the ATCs were simply magnificent as passive boxes go. I have a friend who imports Norwegian amps and sells speakers kits, he came round with some gear a while ago and we ended up maxing out everything. The ATCs just got louder, with no drama at all, but that's at levels that were at front row at Donnington gig levels so not relevant for normal domestic use.
Userlevel 1
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Another question - when connecting a device, for example a smartphone or laptop using the 3.5mm jack, does this receive an analogue signal from that device? Can I play my music library off my laptop for example, be it FLAC, spotify offline files etc in other words I'm using the device in built media player and DAC, not the sonos speaker? Also, if used in the configuration, and my device is connected to one of the PLAY 5 units, can I link the other speakers to it so that I can play the pair in stereo, and to all of the other players in the network?
How many times to ask the same question? Yes, yes, yes and yes, I think that's the right number but every question you asked is a yes.
Userlevel 1
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As many times as it takes to get a clear answer (to me) but thanks anyway. To answer nicka99 pretty good. OK, not the last word in audiophile reproduction, but then I am comparing it to a system that's probably one if the best under 10k and sonos is nothing like that. I don't really miss that small gain in SQ, the play 5 in stereo is plenty loud enough, and perfectly capable of being engaging whatever that means. I just need to find a russ Andrews power cord and I'm sure it will stay anything sonically.... 🙂 trouble is the cost saving isn't quite going to plan. I think I need a sub and another 1
Userlevel 7
Badge +22
oops I didn't see second page of comments when I put this answer (so its rather late answer but I will go ahead and leave it).

Personally - I would recommend as stuart said to have one unit hooked to your router and thus use Sonosnet. That gets music traffic off your home wifi and also then each sonos unit is a repeater giving you a strong signal between each of your sonos units.

To use Sonosnet you need to hook 1 unit to your router by Ethernet. If none of the ones you just bought are near your router - then you could get a bridge or a boost to make that connection instead (that is all they are for is to make a connection if it is not convenient to have one of your speakers connected).

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