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Ordering for a new Setup

  • 27 July 2020
  • 5 replies
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I have moved into a new home, I do not have the option of hard wiring Rear surround speakers.  I currently have DEFINITIVE TECHNOLOGY BP 2000 Speakers with LFE Powered Subwoofer inputs I would like to retain as my Subs and Front/Main Speakers.  I have a Traditional Center Channel I may or may not use.  I have a Sony A9G OLED TV.  This had all previously been connected to a Pioneer Elite VSX-LX504.  How can I retain my front speakers but still add sonos surrounds?  Even if that means adding equipment?

 

I was hoping I could install 2 Sonos amps, One for front channels and LFE line level sub.  The other for Center Channel.  Then add a pair of One SLs.

 

Another option I don’t know is possible but would be preferred because of Atmos.  Add an Arc, then a Amp to power the two fronts and the LFE powered sub.  And then add two Sonos Play Ones. 

 

Lastly I wish there was a way to still use my Sonos compatible Pioneer Elite reciever to handle the front, subs, center then line out wirelessly to the Play Ones as rears.  

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Best answer by melvimbe 27 July 2020, 19:11

I was hoping I could install 2 Sonos amps, One for front channels and LFE line level sub.  The other for Center Channel.  Then add a pair of One SLs.

 

 

You can’t use an Amp for the center channel.  The amp powering your left and right generates a phantom center channel.  Everything else you describe is fine.

 

 

Another option I don’t know is possible but would be preferred because of Atmos.  Add an Arc, then a Amp to power the two fronts and the LFE powered sub.  And then add two Sonos Play Ones. 

 

 

This is not possible.   Whatever device is connected to the TV (Arc in this case), generates all front channels.  You can’t add an amp or any Sonos speakers as additional front channels.

 

 

Lastly I wish there was a way to still use my Sonos compatible Pioneer Elite reciever to handle the front, subs, center then line out wirelessly to the Play Ones as rears.  

 

Sorry, but this isn’t possible either. You can’t mix Sonos speakers with third party amps like that.

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I was hoping I could install 2 Sonos amps, One for front channels and LFE line level sub.  The other for Center Channel.  Then add a pair of One SLs.

 

 

You can’t use an Amp for the center channel.  The amp powering your left and right generates a phantom center channel.  Everything else you describe is fine.

 

 

Another option I don’t know is possible but would be preferred because of Atmos.  Add an Arc, then a Amp to power the two fronts and the LFE powered sub.  And then add two Sonos Play Ones. 

 

 

This is not possible.   Whatever device is connected to the TV (Arc in this case), generates all front channels.  You can’t add an amp or any Sonos speakers as additional front channels.

 

 

Lastly I wish there was a way to still use my Sonos compatible Pioneer Elite reciever to handle the front, subs, center then line out wirelessly to the Play Ones as rears.  

 

Sorry, but this isn’t possible either. You can’t mix Sonos speakers with third party amps like that.

This happens to be a large room 20X50 with the television facing the longer dimension.  Would the ARC still work in such a large room to project Atmos sound? 

This happens to be a large room 20X50 with the television facing the longer dimension.  Would the ARC still work in such a large room to project Atmos sound? 

 

The room dimensions are a secondary factor to the location of the main seating area and the ceiling height and dimensions.  The upfiring audio needs to bounce of the ceiling and down the seating area.  The effect won’t work if the ceiling is to high, angled, or made out sound absorbing materials.  It also won’t work if the seating area is too close (maybe around 5 ft) or too far (maybe beyond 12-15 feet?) from the speaker.  Those are my best guesses, there is probably an official guide for this somewhere around here.  I’ve heard that some people are angling the Arc up a bit to get a different more effective bound pattern.

 

Along those same lines, you do not want to have your surround speakers 50 ft away from the TV.  They should be a few feet behind the seating area.  If you can’t do that  for whatever reason, I don’t think I would attempt to setup HT audio for that space, probably just stick with stereo audio.  That’s especially true if you intend for audio to be well heard at the back of the room, probably use multiple stereo pairs for that case.  If this is supposed to be a true home theatre with multiple rows of seats across the whole space, then I would not use Sonos for that.

This happens to be a large room 20X50 with the television facing the longer dimension.  Would the ARC still work in such a large room to project Atmos sound? 

 

The room dimensions are a secondary factor to the location of the main seating area and the ceiling height and dimensions.  The upfiring audio needs to bounce of the ceiling and down the seating area.  The effect won’t work if the ceiling is to high, angled, or made out sound absorbing materials.  It also won’t work if the seating area is too close (maybe around 5 ft) or too far (maybe beyond 12-15 feet?) from the speaker.  Those are my best guesses, there is probably an official guide for this somewhere around here.  I’ve heard that some people are angling the Arc up a bit to get a different more effective bound pattern.

 

Along those same lines, you do not want to have your surround speakers 50 ft away from the TV.  They should be a few feet behind the seating area.  If you can’t do that  for whatever reason, I don’t think I would attempt to setup HT audio for that space, probably just stick with stereo audio.  That’s especially true if you intend for audio to be well heard at the back of the room, probably use multiple stereo pairs for that case.  If this is supposed to be a true home theatre with multiple rows of seats across the whole space, then I would not use Sonos for that.

Thank you for the help.  I’ve had a couple of wired Atmos systems so I understand that.  But have yet to have a soundbar Atmos system and forgot how much it relies on the ceiling for reflection.  And in this case reflecting off the ceiling is not an option. This room have a tall pitch vaulted ceiling lined in tongue and groove wood.   

There is outlets in the floor under the seating area so a 4.1 setup with the Def techs in the front tied to a sonos Amp.  And Play Ones providing PCM based surround formats maybe the only Sonos surround sound option for now.

Thank you for the help.  I’ve had a couple of wired Atmos systems so I understand that.  But have yet to have a soundbar Atmos system and forgot how much it relies on the ceiling for reflection.  And in this case reflecting off the ceiling is not an option. This room have a tall pitch vaulted ceiling lined in tongue and groove wood.   

There is outlets in the floor under the seating area so a 4.1 setup with the Def techs in the front tied to a sonos Amp.  And Play Ones providing PCM based surround formats maybe the only Sonos surround sound option for now.

 

I’ve never tried it before, but perhaps something like this is an option.  Might be worth trying out and returning if it doesn’t work.   Much cheaper than an Amp and 2 play:1s and you get to keep your center channel.

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