Question

How to update this system?


Hi, I have two Sony 300 CD carousels my spouse will not part with that are hooked up wirelessly to eight large older speakers that must be turned on and off individually. I would like to replace the speakers with four Sonos speakers that can be turned on and off with some kind of controller. Clearly I need an interface of some sort to attach to one or both of the carousels. In the archives, I read about someone who had a similar request about a year ago and Connect (a transmitter? ) was recommended along with Sonos One speakers.  Given the passage of time, are these still the best options? Are there newer pieces on the market? We live in a small open concept home with a three-sided loft, so I am thinking two speakers on each level. Thoughts and suggestions welcome. Would love to stream but that is not in the cards at this point.  Thanks and cheers! 


11 replies

How do the carousels connect wirelessly to your current speakers? How do you chose which carousel plays in which speakers? What model speakers are you currently using?

I am using Bacini acoustica speakers. Each one comes with a transmitter, but I only need 1 transmitter to transmit sound to any or all the speakers. We don’t operate both carousels at the same time, so we don’t have to differentiate, although that is an excellent question.

 

Bacini, not Bacina

I’m not finding any reliable information about these speakers. Note that none of the SONOS speakers are weatherproof.

Using the carousels with SONOS speakers would require the use of a SONOS PORT. One of the carousels would be connected to PORT and played through the SONOS speakers. You could connect both carousels through the use of a selector switch or reconnecting the carousels as needed. You use a phone/pad/computer to control the SONOS system.

Many users are reluctant to give up their disc players. i understand that, but I have observed that other than “kicking the tires” on day one to make sure that the player still works, this is the last use of the player.

You can “rip” your CD’s to a hard drive or memory stick and play these tracks on your SONOS system. When I’m ripping I stack the CD’s nearby, drop the CD into the tray and start the process. When the disc is finished, the tray opens and I feed it again. The first couple rips might cause sweaty palms, but it quickly becomes routine. It’s not hard to rip 20 or so discs an hour as a background task.

Thank you for your information. I greatly appreciate your input. The speakers don’t have to be weather proof, so that is not a problem. As for not giving up disc players, I understand exactly what you are saying, but we live in a cold, isolated area and listen to music almost daily, especially in the winter. 

At some point those carousels will fail and repair will be difficult. As a hedge, start ripping your CD’s now. You can spread this task over weeks or months. Then, you’ll be prepared when the carousels reach EOL (End of Life).

Assuming that you go with SONOS, after ripping a few discs, play them using the SONOS controller and become familiar with the user interface. My prediction is that you accelerate the ripping process and retire the carousels early.

Using the SONOS controller, tracks are available almost instantly. There is no waiting for the carousels to click, clack, and whir. “Programming” (making a playlist) is much easier on SONOS.

Userlevel 7
Badge +21

I ripped my collection and gave the spouse the option of using the CD changer or the music library. Took a week but the changer ended up sitting and collecting dust until she suggested scrapping it.

Tips: Always rip to a lossless format, I use FLAC, you can convert from that to anything with no additional losses of quality.

Rip using all your computers and drives, I had a half dozen computers, a couple with multiple drives all ripping at once. 

Make a master copy, exactly as ripped, make a second copy to do edits and cleanup on the metadata as well as adding album art and such. Back both up to a safe location or two so you never have to do the ripping/editing again.

Userlevel 2
Badge +2

I did the same a few years ago. And when I had finished ripping about 450 cd’s and copying flacs to my Synology NAS I bumped into Apple Music :)

The NAS does it’s job just as fine as Apple Music does, but I barely use it as streaming is so easy. And those cd’s...well, sometimes I miss them and visit them in the attic, and I muse about how well we had it together, but then I turn around and leave them. No cd changer can compete with the ease of use of Sonos, whether it’s with a streaming service or with files saved on a central system. 

Userlevel 7
Badge +21

If only streaming services offered a wider selection of music! I have a good part of my collection that is never likely to be streamed, sadly it is my favorite part too.

 

I had a half dozen computers, a couple with multiple drives all ripping at once. 

That was my strategy. I found that certain drives tolerated damaged discs better than others. There was an old W95 machine that could read CD’s that actual CD players would reject.

I had piles of discs everywhere -- “In the Queue”, “needs meta data”, “needs artwork”, “needs cleaning”, “wait for the W95 machine”, “done”. As trays opened, I’d feed a machine. In between feedings I’d work on meta data and artwork.

 

Userlevel 7
Badge +21

I passed a copy of my “completed” work to the wife for a final proofreading before loading into the Sonos.

Once loaded I went through carefully looking for things in the wrong/typoed genre and missing bits because Sonos objected to a character.

I too have a special drive, an antique Plexstor that will read about anything. I salvaged it and put it in a USB/e-SATA external case, if I ever need it it will be easy to hook up.

I dug an old Xenon 8 core 32 GB beast out of the scrap pile and set it in the garage to trans-code my FLAC collection to MP3, sounded like a Hoover, hot as an oven but it tore through the collection at incredible speeds.

Reply