Question

Why no surround speaker as the wired speaker?


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I'm interested in switching to the wired set-up but one of my surrounds -- a Sonos One -- connected to my Sonos Amp is the only one close enough to the router to connect. I saw in this article that " We do not recommend using the Sub or surround speakers as the wired products." and was just wondering why? Or if there are any other possible solutions here given the proximity issue I mentioned.

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Userlevel 5
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Data flow. Always want it going downstream instead of upstream. The surrounds bond to your soundbar, so ideally that's what you want wired in. You can always look into a Boost though if you want a device wired to your network.

And honestly, I have a surround wired to my router just because it's the closest device, and I don't feel like shelling out $100 for a device I can't even play music to. I don't see any actual issues during playback or connectivity.
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So basically it works but is not recommended?
Userlevel 5
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Exactly. It can cause playback issues here and there.

Normally you want a stand alone speaker plugged into the router, or the device that your surrounds.

Surrounds bond to the soundbar on a 5GHz band. Sonosnet (which is produced by a device wired into the network) is a 2.4GHz signal, so essentially you're kind of overworking the little speaker.

There's a bit more to it, but that should help explain why it's not really recommended.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
Try it and see what happens.

What I'd do is but a Play 1 and put it where it could be wired easily, only a few bucks more than a Boost and it is a speaker as well as a connection point. Second choice is a Boost.

For a bit more money the Sonos Ones should also be considered if you want the additional features they offer and don't mind the higher cost.
I saw in this article that " We do not recommend using the Sub or surround speakers as the wired products." and was just wondering why?
Others here have touched on related matters, but one of the reasons is that when idle the Sonos home theatre setups (e.g. Amp + surrounds) periodically scan for the best 5GHz channel. This means that connections to the surrounds are interrupted, albeit briefly, every hour.

Clearly to the HT setup this is neither here nor there, as they're all idle at the time. However it can matter to the rest of the system if it relies on a surround for its only connection to the outside world. There's a small risk that active music playback on another room could be affected.
I'd say it's because of the 'master --> slave' relationship in a surround setup. You don't want to make a 'slave' the root bridge/system coordinator.
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Thanks all for the feedback!
What I'd do is but a Play 1 and put it where it could be wired easily, only a few bucks more than a Boost and it is a speaker as well as a connection point. Second choice is a Boost.

For a bit more money the Sonos Ones should also be considered if you want the additional features they offer and don't mind the higher cost.


Thanks for the suggestion. The router is literally next to the Sonos One in my surround pair so putting another/different speaker there is not really an option. The Surround speaker is pretty much where the surround speaker has to be. I may see if I can relocate the router or run some ethernet to a different component.
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I guess a broader question: is it worth it? I've had temporary interruptions in the fully wireless set-up that I haven't been able to isolate. Does the wired set-up tend to be significantly more stable/performant?

A few of the challenges I'm running into are: general interference (I live in a pretty densely populated neighborhood with lots of WiFi networks in range) and WiFi signal coverage. I'm using an Orbi mesh system which supposedly offers plenty of coverage for a pretty small house but the house is old with plaster walls. I've tried adjusting the channel of the WiFi and doesn't seem to have had much of an impact.

Realize there's a lot going on there and it's hard to answer whether it will fix everything but just wondering what sorts of results people tend to see by going wired before investing much time or money into upgrading the setup.

Thanks in advance for all of the great feedback!
Sonos in WiFi mode tends not to go nicely with a mesh WiFi system like Orbi. Players attach to different WiFi nodes, often on different channels. Sonos doesn't like this because grouped players on different channels can't connect directly peer-to-peer.

Under such circumstances the recommendation is to .... wire one of the Sonos devices and go over to SonosNet mode.
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Sonos in WiFi mode tends not to go nicely with a mesh WiFi system like Orbi. Players attach to different WiFi nodes, often on different channels. Sonos doesn't like this because grouped players on different channels can't connect directly peer-to-peer.

Under such circumstances the recommendation is to .... wire one of the Sonos devices and go over to SonosNet mode.


Thanks!
Userlevel 5
Badge +13
I guess a broader question: is it worth it?

Only one way to find out!

As Glade would say. "Plug it in, plug it in"
By the way, you're stating that "The router is literally next to the Sonos One..." which is actually not great. There should be around a meter ( or a couple of feet, to three feet, if you're here in the US ) between the two, so that there's no wireless interference between the two electrical sources.

That actually might be the cause of your dropouts.
Badge +2
By the way, you're stating that "The router is literally next to the Sonos One..." which is actually not great. There should be around a meter ( or a couple of feet, to three feet, if you're here in the US ) between the two, so that there's no wireless interference between the two electrical sources.

That actually might be the cause of your dropouts.


Got it. I'lll see if I can separate them a bit. Thanks!

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