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TV sound through Sonos Amp not in sync with other Sonos devices

  • 1 May 2019
  • 8 replies
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I have my Sony TV optical audio port connected to the Sonos Amp using the Sonos Optical to HDMI converter. I'm happy with the setup as long as I only attempt to output the TV sound on the speakers attached to the Sonos Amp. If I group another Sonos speaker (in my case a Sonos One Gen 2), the TV sound on the other speaker is not properly in sync and I hear an echoed sound, unlike when I play music on my various Sonos devices. I tried rebooting the Sonos One devices but it did not fix the issue. Any idea?

thanks!
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Best answer by Airgetlam 1 May 2019, 18:12

That’s actually the way the system is designed.

Bonded speakers (the SUB, surrounds) communicate on a low latency network of 5 GHz, so they’re in sync. There may be some aspect of because they’re few in number, it makes a difference, too.

Grouped speakers will communicate on the 2.4Ghz channel. Sonos software will buffer a certain amount, in order to ensure that the stream can be in sync across up to 32 other speakers. The delay is on the order of 70ms, and there’s no way to get rid of it.

Your system is working as properly, just probably not the way you want.
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That’s actually the way the system is designed.

Bonded speakers (the SUB, surrounds) communicate on a low latency network of 5 GHz, so they’re in sync. There may be some aspect of because they’re few in number, it makes a difference, too.

Grouped speakers will communicate on the 2.4Ghz channel. Sonos software will buffer a certain amount, in order to ensure that the stream can be in sync across up to 32 other speakers. The delay is on the order of 70ms, and there’s no way to get rid of it.

Your system is working as properly, just probably not the way you want.
Thank you - I'm not sure if the 70ms delay is the problem I'm seeing.

If I read you well, that 70ms delay for grouped speakers is what I may routinely experience when streaming music to several of my Sonos One devices - such as for example playing music from the Spotify app. When I do this, I do not notice any delay - certainly that delay exists but it is so small that my human ear cannot notice it.

When I group a Sonos One to the Amp playing the TV sound, the delay/ echo is very significant and I just cannot keep streaming to the Sonos One as the echo is very disturbing.

I understand that the Amp is primarily trying to be in sync with the video on my TV, but I believe that when I group other devices, it should act as if I were streaming music and primarily ensure that audio is in sync on all speakers rather than prioritize synchronicity with my TV screen. What do you think?
Thank you - I'm not sure if the 70ms delay is the problem I'm seeing.

If I read you well, that 70ms delay for grouped speakers is what I may routinely experience when streaming music to several of my Sonos One devices - such as for example playing music from the Spotify app. When I do this, I do not notice any delay - certainly that delay exists but it is so small that my human ear cannot notice it.

When I group a Sonos One to the Amp playing the TV sound, the delay/ echo is very significant and I just cannot keep streaming to the Sonos One as the echo is very disturbing.

I understand that the Amp is primarily trying to be in sync with the video on my TV, but I believe that when I group other devices, it should act as if I were streaming music and primarily ensure that audio is in sync on all speakers rather than prioritize synchronicity with my TV screen. What do you think?
The audio delay only applies to TV audio... not music audio.

TV audio to your Amp and any bonded surrounds operates so that it keeps in perfect lip-sync with the video on the TV screen... music audio on the other hand does not have to lip-sync with anything .., so music audio is buffered to all Sonos devices to keep all speakers playing the music in sync.

Once you step away from your amp and any bonded surrounds and begin including other 'grouped sonos rooms’ into your TV audio playback, the grouped rooms output will be delayed and give an echo effect, because they will buffer the audio being received, as if it were music being played.

So what Bruce has explained to you is correct. However, all may not be lost here...

Goto the Amp “Room Settings” in the Sonos App and select “Advanced Audio/TV Dialog” .. in there is a lip-sync slider control. If you slide it to the right hand side, it will buffer the TV Audio and slow it down on the Amp and bonded surrounds... you should (hopefully) be able to get the playing TV audio to slow down and sync with the audio then coming from the “grouped” rooms... this tends to be fine and is often “trouble-free”, in my experience, with a TV source that outputs audio in PCM stereo, but you may struggle to get things to sync when playing a 5.1 Dolby Digital audio stream, as you may see the audio fall behind the video on the TV screen... but try the lip-sync slider control in the App and see if that fixes things for you.

Hope that helps. ?
Thanks a lot - I'll give it a try and report back.

Out of curiosity, is there any hardware limitation that prevents a One to be bonded to the Amp? Or is it a pure software limitation currently?

For anyone reading, I also want to share that when playing media on an Apple TV, I get perfect video and audio synchronicity on all devices through Airplay 2. But sadly I'm not always using the Apple TV as media source.
Thanks a lot - I'll give it a try and report back.

Out of curiosity, is there any hardware limitation that prevents a One to be bonded to the Amp? Or is it a pure software limitation currently?



"Bonded" is the term for connecting a speaker for use as a stereo pair and/or surrounds, and you can most certainly bond two Ones with an Amp as surrounds. If you mean grouping a One with an Amp without delay, the explanation is this: Bonding units into 5.1 surround sound system assumes they will all be in the same room, It can therefore use the 5 GHz band to assure no lag. Unfortunately, 5 GHz has less range and penetration, and was found to have trouble getting through walls/floors etc. when grouping room to room, so Sonos uses the standard 2.4 GHz band when grouping.
Thanks a lot - I'll give it a try and report back.

Out of curiosity, is there any hardware limitation that prevents a One to be bonded to the Amp? Or is it a pure software limitation currently?

For anyone reading, I also want to share that when playing media on an Apple TV, I get perfect video and audio synchronicity on all devices through Airplay 2. But sadly I'm not always using the Apple TV as media source.
You can “bond” the following to your Amp...

2 x Play: 1 (using 5ghz WiFi, or cable connection)
2 x Sonos One (using 5ghz WiFi, or cable connection) .. Gen1 and/or Gen2 (mixed) can be used.
2 x Play: 3 (using 5ghz WiFi, or cable connection)
2 x Play: 5 (Gen2 only) (using 5ghz WiFi, or cable connection)
1 x Connect Amp (using cable connection only)
1 x new Sonos Amp (using 5ghz WiFi, or cable connection)

The bonded setup will give a 5.0 setup, or if you add a Sonos Sub, then a 5.1 setup (you are able to use a 3rd party sub with the main Amp linked to the TV). The front center channel is a phantom center channel.

You can use any Sonos devices to “group” to the Amp, but these connect over a cable, or the slower (far reaching) 2.4ghz wireless link. This is where the ~70ms delay occurs.
Thanks for stepping in, gentlemen, most appreciated 🙂
Thanks all ; Moving the lip-sync slider is giving me a satisfactory result. Bonding was not an option for me as I just wanted to have my TV sound on one single Sonos One in addition to the amp.

Happy with the result all in all! Seems a bit complex to reach for a use case that I guess is common: open kitchen in the living room where I want to relay my TV sound in addition to the Amp being the main TV sound output.

Now I would just dream of my IR remote controlling the group audio volume rather than just the Amp volume 🙂

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