Question

Sonos controller response

  • 14 September 2019
  • 12 replies
  • 151 views

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  • Contributor III
  • 20 replies
Hi everyone.

My sonos system has become practically unusable lately.

the desktop app simply doesn't work. my laptop is line of sight with the router that is 2 meters away and the speakers are also line of sight and a few meters away. when i try to apply a playlist to a room it comes up with a 1001 error. rarely does changing the volume or grouping speakers work. i don't even bother using the desktop app anymore because i know it isn't going to work. this is annoying because i am always at my computer but don't usually have my phone to hand.

when using the phone there is similar results, but the phone will eventually be able to apply music to the speakers.

i don't know if this is sonos's fault, it could be my network setup, but i do have a very fancy Netgear Nighthawk R9000 router which should have some good network coverage.

it is possible that it might be something to do with the speakers being on the 2.4g and the phone and laptop being on 5.0g

but it seems to have got worse the more speakers i have added. i have 12 speakers spread across the house and initially when i had 4 or 5, the system was great, its why i was inspired to buy the others because the speakers just worked every time. now it is a pain in the ass to get them to play anything.

does anyone else have this problem or a solution?

12 replies

Jumping in here.

what restrictions did you have to have to allow the sonos to work? or rather what demands did you have to meet?
A Sonos system -- controllers and players -- simply has to operate in a single flat broadcast subnet. If something blocks broadcasts (and multicasts) the controllers won't be able to discover the players.

wiring the speakers, at least some of them is not possible, or not easy. but having static IPs might work. or i wonder if its possible to use mac addresses instead?

Both. You'd specify a fixed MAC/IP mapping in your router, specifically in its DHCP server.

do you have one network for controllers and one for speakers? because my controllers are on 5Ghz and my speakers are on 2.4 and i wonder if they are having trouble communicating because of that?

Please avoid the term 'network' in this context. It can confuse. Everything has to be on the same network for Sonos to work.

I think you're referring to different 'segments': a 5GHz WiFi segment and a 2.4GHz WiFi segment. Sonos can only attach directly to a 2.4GHz segment when in WiFi mode (i.e. without any components wired). If the controllers are on 5GHz you may encounter problems with some routers, because they don't correctly forward discovery broadcasts (see above) between the two wireless segments.

In that case the options are to use the controllers on 2.4GHz, or to wire one Sonos component and have the system switch over to SonosNet mode. If it's not convenient to wire a player, then use a Boost. A Sonos system in SonosNet mode should be accessible from controllers on both 2.4 and 5GHz.

Earlier you commented that wiring a Beam caused problems. Switching from a WiFi ("wireless") configuration to SonosNet ("wired") will stop playback, as the units have to do a soft restart. The system then needs a couple of minutes to reconfigure itself.

Sometimes a few units will remain stuck on WiFi, which you can see in Settings/System/About My Sonos System. WM:0 signifies wired or SonosNet. WM:1 or WM:2 means WiFi. If this occurs, return here for further advice.
so is SonosNet a mesh network? with every speaker working like a repeater? and if so can a speaker use more than one other speaker to source a signal and then flip between the one with the best signal at the time?
It is a mesh, and each node can act as both receiver and transmitter. I wouldn't call it 'flipping' but the mesh does sort itself out automatically, so as to ensure that (a) nodes have a decent signal and (b) the number of hops back to the wired network is minimised. As a general rule the topology remains fixed mid-term unless conditions change substantially, or nodes are added/removed.

If you're interested, the topology determination uses a customised form of the Spanning Tree Protocol. It's modified in particular to allow for the variable 'costs' of different wireless paths based on signal conditions, and also builds in some weighting to discourage the use of weak paths. The resulting topology can be inspected in the Network Matrix at http://IP_of_a_player:1400/support/review.
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interesting, what restrictions did you have to have to allow the sonos to work? or rather what demands did you have to meet?

What ratty said plus having all APs on the same channel and not being able to use Airtime Fairness.

I quit looking at that point and went to Boost Mode so there may be other issues.
Most, if not all of this can be attributed to either wifi interference, or duplicate IP address issues, exposed by software updates to the Sonos system (but not caused by them).

If the various solutions in that FAQ don’t help, try resetting your network by unplugging all of your Sonos devices from power, then rebooting your router. Once the router come back up, plug your Sonos devices back in to the power.

You may also find some relief if you were to move your system to a wired / SonosNet mode, by wiring one of your Sonos speakers to your router with an Ethernet cable. It seems to be generally accepted that for larger number of speakers, it helps.
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Most, if not all of this can be attributed to either wifi interference, or duplicate IP address issues, exposed by software updates to the Sonos system (but not caused by them).

If the various solutions in that FAQ don’t help, try resetting your network by unplugging all of your Sonos devices from power, then rebooting your router. Once the router come back up, plug your Sonos devices back in to the power.

You may also find some relief if you were to move your system to a wired / SonosNet mode, by wiring one of your Sonos speakers to your router with an Ethernet cable. It seems to be generally accepted that for larger number of speakers, it helps.



thanks for the reply,

i did try that wired idea, the beam is very close to the router so i connected that with a cable but what it seemed to do was simply remove the wireless from the beam. when i unplugged the cable from the beam it stopped playing instantly but everything else was still working fine and controllable.

i thought the idea was that if one speaker is connected, it basically becomes a master access point for all the other speakers and then they work in a mesh network, extending the signal around the house.
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I am much happier now that I wired all the Sonos devices it was easy to wire and quit trying to use my home WiFi to share the music. Getting the Sonos off my WiFi also let me set the WiFi up with optimal settings for my other devices without having to account for the Sonos demands.

I got tired of issues after power flops and updates, the rebooting is a pain here so I added static/reserved IP addresses for all Sonos devices and that issue went away.

You can look at your networking if you put one of your Sonos IP addresses in this link (not a Boost or Bridge) and look at the Network Matrix. Post a legible copy if you need help sorting ti out.

Use your IP - http://x.x.x.x:1400/support/review


interesting, what restrictions did you have to have to allow the sonos to work? or rather what demands did you have to meet?

wiring the speakers, at least some of them is not possible, or not easy. but having static IPs might work. or i wonder if its possible to use mac addresses instead?

do you have one network for controllers and one for speakers? because my controllers are on 5Ghz and my speakers are on 2.4 and i wonder if they are having trouble communicating because of that?
Badge +2
Jumping in here.


what restrictions did you have to have to allow the sonos to work? or rather what demands did you have to meet?A Sonos system -- controllers and players -- simply has to operate in a single flat broadcast subnet. If something blocks broadcasts (and multicasts) the controllers won't be able to discover the players.


wiring the speakers, at least some of them is not possible, or not easy. but having static IPs might work. or i wonder if its possible to use mac addresses instead?
Both. You'd specify a fixed MAC/IP mapping in your router, specifically in its DHCP server.


do you have one network for controllers and one for speakers? because my controllers are on 5Ghz and my speakers are on 2.4 and i wonder if they are having trouble communicating because of that?
Please avoid the term 'network' in this context. It can confuse. Everything has to be on the same network for Sonos to work.

I think you're referring to different 'segments': a 5GHz WiFi segment and a 2.4GHz WiFi segment. Sonos can only attach directly to a 2.4GHz segment when in WiFi mode (i.e. without any components wired). If the controllers are on 5GHz you may encounter problems with some routers, because they don't correctly forward discovery broadcasts (see above) between the two wireless segments.

In that case the options are to use the controllers on 2.4GHz, or to wire one Sonos component and have the system switch over to SonosNet mode. If it's not convenient to wire a player, then use a Boost. A Sonos system in SonosNet mode should be accessible from controllers on both 2.4 and 5GHz.

Earlier you commented that wiring a Beam caused problems. Switching from a WiFi ("wireless") configuration to SonosNet ("wired") will stop playback, as the units have to do a soft restart. The system then needs a couple of minutes to reconfigure itself.

Sometimes a few units will remain stuck on WiFi, which you can see in Settings/System/About My Sonos System. WM:0 signifies wired or SonosNet. WM:1 or WM:2 means WiFi. If this occurs, return here for further advice.


awesome thanks for the detailed explanation. it does sound like the easiest solution is a boost. does the speakers have to be manually set to use SonosNet or does that happen automatically when one of them is on a wired connection?
awesome thanks for the detailed explanation. it does sound like the easiest solution is a boost. does the speakers have to be manually set to use SonosNet or does that happen automatically when one of them is on a wired connection?
It's automatic. See https://support.sonos.com/s/article/3209 and https://support.sonos.com/s/article/3237.

In view of your other thread, however, you may want to pause and take stock. Each wired/SonosNet system needs at least one device to be wired. If you were to divide the players up into multiple systems then each would need a wired component. You could of course choose to have some systems 'wired' and some 'wireless' (on WiFi).
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awesome thanks for the detailed explanation. it does sound like the easiest solution is a boost. does the speakers have to be manually set to use SonosNet or does that happen automatically when one of them is on a wired connection?It's automatic. See https://support.sonos.com/s/article/3209 and https://support.sonos.com/s/article/3237.

In view of your other thread, however, you may want to pause and take stock. Each wired/SonosNet system needs at least one device to be wired. If you were to divide the players up into multiple systems then each would need a wired component. You could of course choose to have some systems 'wired' and some 'wireless' (on WiFi).


ok thanks, that it is a little confusing terminology that a "wired" setup is still mostly wireless, its just that one unit is wired. but at least now i know how to check if it has worked. i am going to try plugging the beam back in an see if it is truly on SonosNet
ok thanks, that it is a little confusing terminology that a "wired" setup is still mostly wireless, its just that one unit is wired.
Indeed. The evolution of the nomenclature has raised a few eyebrows. Before it became "wired", a SonosNet configuration was called "Boost setup", despite the fact that a Boost was entirely optional.

To perhaps add to the confusion "wireless" (WiFi) mode was "standard setup". For those of us who'd acquired systems in the mid-2000s this was all rather peculiar, as SonosNet was the only (standard) connection method back then.

It's something of a mystery why they couldn't simply call them "SonosNet mode" and "WiFi mode".
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ok thanks, that it is a little confusing terminology that a "wired" setup is still mostly wireless, its just that one unit is wired.Indeed. The evolution of the nomenclature has raised a few eyebrows. Before it became "wired", a SonosNet configuration was called "Boost setup", despite the fact that a Boost was entirely optional.

To perhaps add to the confusion "wireless" (WiFi) mode was "standard setup". For those of us who'd acquired systems in the mid-2000s this was all rather peculiar, as SonosNet was the only (standard) connection method back then.

It's something of a mystery why they couldn't simply call them "SonosNet mode" and "WiFi mode".


yeah that sounds even more complex! i guess i should be grateful to start with all this in 2019.

so is SonosNet a mesh network? with every speaker working like a repeater? and if so can a speaker use more than one other speaker to source a signal and then flip between the one with the best signal at the time?
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I am much happier now that I wired all the Sonos devices it was easy to wire and quit trying to use my home WiFi to share the music. Getting the Sonos off my WiFi also let me set the WiFi up with optimal settings for my other devices without having to account for the Sonos demands.

I got tired of issues after power flops and updates, the rebooting is a pain here so I added static/reserved IP addresses for all Sonos devices and that issue went away.

You can look at your networking if you put one of your Sonos IP addresses in this link (not a Boost or Bridge) and look at the Network Matrix. Post a legible copy if you need help sorting ti out.

Use your IP - http://x.x.x.x:1400/support/review

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