Question

Sonos Boost dropping out


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Hey!

I bought a Sonos Boost a couple of weeks ago and I am not very impressed... I thought it would solve all issues regarding drop outs from a live audio feed from my Sonos Connect to my pair of Play 1's however it still cuts out (though not as often, but often enough for it to really ruin the immersion in my audio. We're talking once every couple of hours and when I get a dropout spike, it will carry on for like 5 minutes).

I'd also like to add that my Sonos Boost is LITERALLY placed right next to both of the speakers. It's in the middle with spacing of 1ft between them.

Diagnostic: 7171610

If someone from the support could look through that, and let me know what's wrong, that'd be great! ^^ It's driving me nuts haha.

Thanks :)

EDIT: I have disconnected the ethernet port from the Boost... It hasn't dropped out yet haha.
Huh

EDIT #2: Ok dropping out again *Sigh*

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15 replies

Hi. Your post is rather baffling I'm afraid. You probably have interference or IP address conflicts on your network, which a Boost won't help to fix. But also, if you are able to connect the Boost by Ethernet when it is sitting next to other Sonos components, why not just connect one of those components instead of the Boost?

Finally, if there is no other component wired to your router, and the Boost itself is not wired to the router any more, then the Boost is doing absolutely nothing on your system.

It sounds like you may be using a line-in, in which case the problem might be solved by setting the line-in compression to "compressed".

Hopefully the diagnostic will help.
Userlevel 6
Badge +9
Hi. Your post is rather baffling I'm afraid. You probably have interference or IP address conflicts on your network, which a Boost won't help to fix. But also, if you are able to connect the Boost by Ethernet when it is sitting next to other Sonos components, why not just connect one of those components instead of the Boost?

Finally, if there is no other component wired to your router, and the Boost itself is not wired to the router any more, then the Boost is doing absolutely nothing on your system.

It sounds like you may be using a line-in, in which case the problem might be solved by setting the line-in compression to "compressed".

Hopefully the diagnostic will help.


That's sage advice, if indeed linein is the culprit. Some time ago I was having problems with dropouts from my Chromecast audio connected to my Play5 and with airplay to Sonos with an Apple Airport Express router connected to a Sonos Connect. Meanwhile, there were no problems with dropouts using conventional Sonos configurations. (I was using linein mainly to get around the Audible books problem and to stream relaxing environmental sounds to block ambient noise at night.) Someone here kindly pointed me toward the compressed setting and all problems disappeared.
Badge +1
Hi. Your post is rather baffling I'm afraid. You probably have interference or IP address conflicts on your network, which a Boost won't help to fix. But also, if you are able to connect the Boost by Ethernet when it is sitting next to other Sonos components, why not just connect one of those components instead of the Boost?

Finally, if there is no other component wired to your router, and the Boost itself is not wired to the router any more, then the Boost is doing absolutely nothing on your system.

It sounds like you may be using a line-in, in which case the problem might be solved by setting the line-in compression to "compressed".

Hopefully the diagnostic will help.


I have done everything I can to try and strengthen the signal to my players. Here's my configuration:

http://i.imgur.com/tLf5wpN.png

And about disconnecting the BOOST from the router:
Yes, once I disconnect the BOOST it relies on the last instruction my PC sent it before I disconnected it. It remembers I want my aux streamed to the players. But I thought, maybe the ethernet was getting in the way? I don't know - I just want this fixed haha.

I can confirm there are no IP conflicts going on 100%. Everything has its own IP.

One solution that DID work was using a dedicated network switch. I have a 5 port Netgear switch that I plugged into the powerline. The extra ethernet ports meant I could branch out more ethernet cables to all the dedicated devices resulting in a reliable, wired network all on my router. However, I'd rather have it all wireless and use a BOOST because I am stupid. :'D
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Oh! I also need to add the compression setting is not an option for me. I actually use the Sonos PLAY:1's as PC speakers and minimal delay is what I want. :'P
Having it all wireless and using a Boost are mutually exclusive. There really is virtually no point in having a wired Boost sitting next to a wireless speaker I wonder if maybe you aren't clear what a Boost is and does. You have mentioned "switches" and "powerlines" which immediately sounds warning bells. I think best to see what the diagnostic throws up rather than speculate further. But the problem will almost certainly be network related not Sonos related.
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Having it all wireless and using a Boost are mutually exclusive. There really is virtually no point in having a wired Boost sitting next to a wireless speaker I wonder if maybe you aren't clear what a Boost is and does. You have mentioned "switches" and "powerlines" which immediately sounds warning bells. I think best to see what the diagnostic throws up rather than speculate further. But the problem will almost certainly be network related not Sonos related.

What's the concern? If you take a look at the diagram I sent in one of the replies ( http://i.imgur.com/tLf5wpN.png ) this demonstrates not only my configuration but my knowledge of how the Boost works.

I used a switch before I got a Boost. I no longer use the switch. And the powerline is used to send instructions to the Boost via the controller app on my PC. The powerline no longer feeds audio to the boost.

And why isn't there any point in having a wired Boost next to a wireless apeaker? I have two Sonos Play 1s, there isn't enough ethernet ports to spare. 😛
I'd rather wait for the diagnostic than spend time offering further advice for you to dismiss. Good luck sorting this out.
Firstly the powerline may not be involved in Line-In audio traffic, but it most certainly is for everything else. Sonos Support will almost certainly say it should be removed.

The CONNECT is wired ... to the BOOST. Why is the BOOST there at all? Remove it and wire the CONNECT directly. That would at least deal with the Line-In use-case.

As an aside, if all you want is wireless speakers for the PC, using a CONNECT plus a PLAY:1 pair is a very expensive way to do it. Plus it incurs at least 75ms of latency.
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Firstly the powerline may not be involved in Line-In audio traffic, but it most certainly is for everything else. Sonos Support will almost certainly say it should be removed.

The CONNECT is wired ... to the BOOST. Why is the BOOST there at all? Remove it and wire the CONNECT directly. That would at least deal with the Line-In use-case.

As an aside, if all you want is wireless speakers for the PC, using a CONNECT plus a PLAY:1 pair is a very expensive way to do it. Plus it incurs at least 75ms of latency.


I've tried a different setup that I had no clue worked...
Ratty, I now have a rogue BOOST... I had no clue you could put a line in to the Connect and two ethernet cables to the Play 1's. However, this means I have no access to the controller but I don't really care about that as much. If the line in feed is nice a strong I am fine. :)

Also, apologies to John B as one of his suggestions was to do this.

Well I don't need the Boost anymore but I will keep it. I like having a Sonos collection for some odd reason.
I had no clue you could put a line in to the Connect and two ethernet cables to the Play 1's. However, this means I have no access to the controller but I don't really care about that as much. If the line in feed is nice a strong I am fine. 🙂.
You appear to be determined to come up with perverse arrangements. When I said "wire the CONNECT directly" I meant to the powerline apapter, not to each PLAY:1.

If your system was ever configured for 'Standard Setup', i.e. you put in your WiFi details, then the Ethernet cables between the CONNECT and PLAY:1s are doing nothing.

If you've never entered your WiFi details, then the CONNECT/PLAY:1s may be connected to one another, but they're disconnected from the network. Since you said you have "no access to the controller" I assume this is what's happened.

In that case the CONNECT and PLAY:1s have formed an isolated network island, and it's only because Line-In Autoplay has been configured that they're capable of doing anything at all. Basically you've lobotomised a multi-room streaming system, leaving you with PC speakers you could have bought for a fraction of the cost.
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I had no clue you could put a line in to the Connect and two ethernet cables to the Play 1's. However, this means I have no access to the controller but I don't really care about that as much. If the line in feed is nice a strong I am fine. 🙂.
You appear to be determined to come up with perverse arrangements. When I said "wire the CONNECT directly" I meant to the powerline apapter, not to each PLAY:1.

If your system was ever configured for 'Standard Setup', i.e. you put in your WiFi details, then the Ethernet cables between the CONNECT and PLAY:1s are doing nothing.

If you've never entered your WiFi details, then the CONNECT/PLAY:1s may be connected to one another, but they're disconnected from the network. Since you said you have "no access to the controller" I assume this is what's happened.

In that case the CONNECT and PLAY:1s have formed an isolated network island, and it's only because Line-In Autoplay has been configured that they're capable of doing anything at all. Basically you've lobotomised a multi-room streaming system, leaving you with PC speakers you could have bought for a fraction of the cost.


You're correct.
Userlevel 7
Badge +26
Good suggestions all, the diagnostic is basically showing a spam of what are called underflow errors, in short, the players don't have enough data available to play so they cut out. This usually means there's too much latency on the connection and they're losing packets. Most likely causes are interference or lost connections when the audio comes in.

How's it playing with the CONNECT wired directly into the PLAY:1s? If that's playing fine, you could just wire the BOOST to the network and leave it at that setup. With the BOOST wired in you'd be seeing the players again and be able to control them, but the CONNECT should still continue to send the audio to the players over the Ethernet connection.
With the BOOST wired in you'd be seeing the players again and be able to control them, but the CONNECT should still continue to send the audio to the players over the Ethernet connection.
I'd considered that one. The danger is that the root path costs could be within 10 of one another, resulting in a wireless loop via the BOOST being preferred over the direct wired path. There's obviously the 'unsupported' solution for that, or forcing the CONNECT to be root, but I didn't fancy chasing that particular rabbit....
Badge +1
Good suggestions all, the diagnostic is basically showing a spam of what are called underflow errors, in short, the players don't have enough data available to play so they cut out. This usually means there's too much latency on the connection and they're losing packets. Most likely causes are interference or lost connections when the audio comes in.

How's it playing with the CONNECT wired directly into the PLAY:1s? If that's playing fine, you could just wire the BOOST to the network and leave it at that setup. With the BOOST wired in you'd be seeing the players again and be able to control them, but the CONNECT should still continue to send the audio to the players over the Ethernet connection.


Thanks for the reply Ryan! I've actually wired the CONNECT using two ethernet cables and one speaker (left) still drops out. Wiggling the right line in port returns the audio, until it happens again. xD

What i'll do, is get some good Logitech speakers for PC audio and re-locate my Play 1's to be my music options! Best of both worlds. ^^
Hi. Your post is rather baffling I'm afraid. You probably have interference or IP address conflicts on your network, which a Boost won't help to fix. But also, if you are able to connect the Boost by Ethernet when it is sitting next to other Sonos components, why not just connect one of those components instead of the Boost?

Finally, if there is no other component wired to your router, and the Boost itself is not wired to the router any more, then the Boost is doing absolutely nothing on your system.

It sounds like you may be using a line-in, in which case the problem might be solved by setting the line-in compression to "compressed".

Hopefully the diagnostic will help.


That's sage advice, if indeed linein is the culprit. Some time ago I was having problems with dropouts from my Chromecast audio connected to my Play5 and with airplay to Sonos with an Apple Airport Express router connected to a Sonos Connect. Meanwhile, there were no problems with dropouts using conventional Sonos configurations. (I was using linein mainly to get around the Audible books problem and to stream relaxing environmental sounds to block ambient noise at night.) Someone here kindly pointed me toward the compressed setting and all problems disappeared.
. Super helpful! Thank you.