Music library corrupts every few weeks; requires Factory Reset to fix


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Every few weeks, the music library info in my Play 5 and Playbase speakers becomes corrupted. Sonos controller will start saying it cannot find the next song in the playlist, or the next, or the next and so on. The music library is stored on an up-to-date Win10 PC. The music library is managed by MusicBee (NOT iTunes). "Update Music Library Now" does NOT help. Reboot speakers does NOT help. The only solution: (1) Completely uninstall Sonos Controller app on PC and on Android phone; (2) Factory Reset the speakers and set up the system again. When will Sonos write the "Update Music Library Now" software so that it actually does what it says it does: "This will update the Music Library of your Sonos System to match any changes you have made in iTunes or other shared folders."

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Reserved IPs don't do a thing to help. Same problem over and over again. Playlist works fine until the user decides to skip to the next track in the playlist, then the Sonos Controller app goes bonkers and says it can't find the next song or any more songs in the playlist. Clear the queue and re-add the same playlist and everything is find until the user wants to skip to the next track, then all hell breaks loose again.
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Thank you to everyone for your generous forbearance and kind persistence. I think it's time to take a break and (1) see how the reserved IPs work over the long term, (2) actively watch the About My Sonos System indications, and (3) submit system diagnostics to a customer rep if and when the problem arises again. Once again, thank you to everyone.
In past firmware incarnations support/review contained a lot more detail. Many of us feel that the current version is wimpy and we are grumpy. You can certainly verify the IP addresses and, if you are wiring the players, you can see the player's view of this connection. These details are also available in "About My Sonos System ...". For this particular issue, I don't think that /support/review will be much help.

The players have a cache. If a player runs out of data, it will abort the track and try the next track in the Queue. If the player attempts a bunch of tracks, this is an indication that communication to the music source went down. Unfortunately for diagnostic purposes, it is difficult to determine exactly when communication went down because the remainder of a track might already be in the cache. You can play pranks on the system by removing a wired connection while music is playing. Your first reaction will be "did I remove the right connection?" because the music will continue. If the player is able to find an alternate connection before the cache runs out, the music will continue uninterrupted. A really mean prank is to have only one player connected to the network, then move the connection to another player. I can't guarantee that the system will always dig out of this hole, but it is fun when it does. I mention this as an indication that the network support is very robust.
There was no indication that I needed "to have all devices associated with the Sonos system - e.g. controllers, speakers, connect, source devices - on reserved IPs", but I have done so because right now I'll try anything.
Having the controllers reserved as well may be my own brand of 'belt and braces', but I don't see how it can hurt.
Following on from buzz's suggestions, have you tried taking the 'faulty' track out from the queue and seeing whether the next one in line fails - or not?
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Thank you, buzz, for your insights.

Good hypothesis regarding the computer going to sleep at x-minutes. Because that PC is the music media server, it is set to "never" sleep. However, your suggestion triggered me to think along other lines. As proven by my entries in this thread, I can get focused on one set of hypotheses without giving adequate consideration to others.

The two Sonos players are sometimes grouped and sometimes not. In the future I will take note of which one is assigned the Zone Player in charge.

Is there anything to be gained by examining the data that is displayed when when I go to http://xxx.xxx.xx.202:1400/support/review (the IP of the Playbase)?
Note: data from both players is displayed.
MacInOhio,

A few years ago I had indications that an ancient NAS was failing because occasionally it could not play music and seemed not to be able to respond to network requests. Must be EOL for the NAS because I'm too smart for IP address conflicts, right? But, I swallowed my pride and scanned the network in detail (independently of the router) ... Darn! A few weeks prior I had replaced the router. I have a few devices that work best if I fix their addresses and I map these outside of the DHCP range. After replacing the router I went through the network, item by item, integrating each into the new router. I had moved the DHCP managed range of addresses slightly. Unfortunately, there was one forgotten little device tucked away in a cupboard with a fixed IP address that was now inside the new DHCP range. This device was not very active and there were no issues for several weeks. You guessed it, the little device was sharing the NAS IP address.

When in diagnostic mode if one assumes that the problem must be [...] or cannot be [...], one is likely to be blindsided. But, one should play the percentages and not chase the 0.01% probability before checking the 99% item.

The SONOS diagnostic information will provide lots of detail. It's best to submit a diagnostic within about 15 minutes of problem observation because some of the finest detail scrolls.

One detail of your saga that interests me is that the problem seems to pick on a particular track. This should be some sort of clue, but I don't know exactly what this might be. One possibility is that the track is x-minutes into the playlist and the computer is going to sleep at x-minutes.

In a SONOS controller, go to "About My Sonos System" and note the "Associated ZP". Keep track of this because the issue might be unique to one SONOS player. Successive launches of a controller might not Associate with the same player. If a particular player is struggling with its connection, you might have issues only when Associated with that player or the player is the Group Coordinator. Do you Group? The Group Coordinator is the top Player listed in a Group. This player is managing streams to all members of the Group. If the Coordinator is having communication issues, the Group will suffer, but individually each player may work OK.
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All devices associated with Sonos are on reserved IP addresses set by me as follows:
(1) PC music server: xxx.xxx.xx.201
(2) Sonos Playbase: xxx.xxx.xx.202
(3) Sonos Play 5: xxx.xxx.xx.203
(4) Android phone with Sonos app: xxx.xxx.xx.204
All above devices have been rebooted. (That's kinda necessary to complete the IP reservation process.)

If this is as critical to successful, sustained Sonos operation as has been emphasized in this forum, then Sonos setup procedures are seriously deficient. After Factory Reset I have setup the Sonos system using the Android app several times. There was no indication that I needed "to have all devices associated with the Sonos system - e.g. controllers, speakers, connect, source devices - on reserved IPs", but I have done so because right now I'll try anything.

https://support.sonos.com/s/article/2627?language=en_US
There is no IP conflict on the network. The network functions perfectly in connecting Roku, phones, tablets, TVs, PCs. As stated, the (1) Steps provided in "Music library troubleshooting" article in Sonos support have been followed. What else?
I can understand why you don't feel that the network is to blame, when every other device on the network works perfectly. Been there, done that....

However, whether you like it or not, Sonos kit is unusually susceptible to IP issues, so the advice that you're being given above is about as good as it gets. You need to have all devices associated with the Sonos system - e.g. controllers, speakers, connect, source devices - on reserved IPs. If you do that and reboot the entire system then reliability should improve. It did on my system, and this approach has sorted out the problem time after time - as reported on this forum.
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There is no IP conflict on the network. The network functions perfectly in connecting Roku, phones, tablets, TVs, PCs. As stated, the (1) Steps provided in "Music library troubleshooting" article in Sonos support have been followed. What else?
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Step (5) above: rebooted both speakers.

If it is a networking problem, how does a network be selective about choosing one item in a database? Once the problem surfaces, only certain songs are affected, regardless of how much time goes by. The troubleshooting process outlined in the five steps previously stated takes awhile to plow through. During that entire process, the system is tested over and over. Only certain songs are affected. If it was a network problem, it should exhibit itself randomly, over various songs. I don't see how a network could choose only certain songs to refuse to play on one day, and choose to refuse to play only those same songs the next day. If it was problem with the PC server, it should exhibit itself on the PC itself; MusicBee should have a problem playing the same songs with which Sonos has a problem. But that is not the case. As stated in the title: all is resolved when the Sonos speakers are factory reset. Sonos support articles discourage this, but it has become the only way to get the system back to normal . . . for a few months.
That was step (3) mentioned above. "Removed the music folder from Sonos and added it back again, letting Sonos re-analyze the folder"

The same corruptions persisted.

If the file system corruption is on the storage device, then why does that corruption disappear after the Sonos speakers are Factory Reset?

It sounds like you didn’t Reboot your devices.

Reboot all your speakers after the index deletion process... it maybe the case that a speaker is intermittently losing network connection due to 'communication issues” on your network. You should not need to factory reset them each time to solve your indexing problem.

It all points to networking problems... you just can’t seem to accept that ..that’s where the real problem lies here.
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That was step (3) mentioned above. "Removed the music folder from Sonos and added it back again, letting Sonos re-analyze the folder"

The same corruptions persisted.

If the file system corruption is on the storage device, then why does that corruption disappear after the Sonos speakers are Factory Reset?
The library index update will only re-examine files it thinks have changed. You can force a full re-index by removing and re-adding the network share(s).

FWIW my money is also on either a network problem or file system corruption on the storage device.
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"the index that is written to almost every Sonos device got interrupted and corrupted during wireless transmission, perhaps?"

That is what I suspected after troubleshooting. But why doesn't going to the Windows Controller app > Manage > Update Music Library Now fix it? Why is the same corruption still present afterward?
As stated above: there are no IP conflicts. Every device on the net has been checked and double checked. Every Sonos related device has a reserved IP (even though the DHCP assigned IP was verified to be stable for over 18 months).

I asked a simple question: How would a microwave or baby monitor or a IP conflict know to trigger a problem on the same song in a playlist, over and over? How would any network issue affect only a certain song? How is a network selective about one item in a database?

Because the index that is written to almost every Sonos device got interrupted and corrupted during wireless transmission, perhaps? ... and continues to throw the same error each time you try to play the track.

My money and 'mouth' is still 'firmly' on it most likely being a local networking issue, but I think I will choose to leave you troubleshoot this one for yourself. There are plenty of things that you can still go onto try if you want to research through these community pages for yourself.
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As stated above: there are no IP conflicts. I monitor my router every day.

I asked a simple question: How would a microwave or baby monitor or a IP conflict know to trigger a problem on the same song in a playlist, over and over? How would any network issue affect only a certain song? How is a network selective about one item in a database?
I have been offering support for over 10 years in this and other Sonos fora. In those years, the number of times Sonos software has been at fault I can count on two fingers, and both times it caused threads that contained thousands of posts. All other times it was the user's local network, and 99% of those times it was IP conflicts.

Bottom line: If you don't want help, just say so. But please don't waste our time arguing that it is not your network at fault.
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How would a microwave or baby monitor know to trigger a problem on the same song in a playlist, over and over? How would any network issue affect only a certain song? How is a network selective about one item in a database?
MacInOhio,

A description of your network might help here... make/model of router, any switches, access points, repeaters, hubs, software firewalls on the laptop etc.

Are some devices wired, or is everything running on WiFi? What other devices are using the WiFi etc.

Have you considered WiFi channel scanning and changes to reduce WiFi overlap or using SonosNet, or perhaps in some cases, Ethernet?

Just to briefly add, I have been using my music library of 25000+ songs on a dual gigabit wired Netgear mirrored NAS box for a good many years and not ever encountered a single corruption issue, nor any issues with the Sonos indexing or playing of music. I’m sure a good many others will tell a similar story, as it’s quite rare to see an aspect of 'local library indexing corruption' reported in these pages, so I’m not convinced it’s the software at fault, but rather the hardware or network setup is at the root of the problem.

Are you able to see the corruption, or is this really just a break/disruption in the network connection occurring at intermittent times for some unknown reason? Even a microwave or Baby monitor can interrupt a wireless network signal, for example. Local Bluetooth signals too may cause issues.

Have you ever tried wiring the laptop/library to the router to see if that perhaps eradicates the issue for you?

A good description of the actual physical setup may help to throw a little more light on your issue and there are plenty of experienced users here willing to troubleshoot these issues with you.

Adding your Sonos IP addresses to your routers DHCP Reservation Table is a good idea to do by the way as it does add stability to some routers leasing problems that may lead to dropouts of your Sonos devices, but that is just one of a good many things to explore in this type of situation.
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I'm confused by the focus on the network. How does the network suddenly change an IP (dynamic or static) in the middle of playing a playlist? There was no power interruption. If the problem is the network, why does the network work okay during a given session, then not work, then go back to working? Sonos starts out playing the songs in the playlist normally. Then, without warning or power interruption, it suddenly "cannot find" the next song, or the next, or the next. Then, it aborts and goes back to the first song in the playlist and starts playing the songs normally . . . until it gets to the same song that "triggered" the problem earlier. What does IP have to do with this behavior? I've never heard of IPs changing on the fly without some sort of power interruption. If the queue is cleared and a playlist re-added, Sonos plays songs in the playlist for awhile, but then suddenly, it cannot find the next song, or the next, and the whole cycle starts again. If the problem is IP centered or network related, then how does Sonos work okay, playing songs in a playlist, during the troubled session . . . until it gets to a certain song (which it had been playing just fine a few hours earlier)? If the problem is network related, how does the network "know" which is the problem song to start generating network errors? (Note: the music server PC and both Sonos speakers have reserved IPs).
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I have a very nice router, pfSense on a Netgate-2440 box and have spent hours fighting this issue. I have read so many logs that my eyes hurt thinking about it. I never saw a single indication in the logs of any unexpected or odd Sonos activity so I discounted this solution for many months.

In a fit of frustration after an update triggered the issue again I spent the few minutes needed to assign all my Sonos devices static/reserved IP addresses. The power cycle, update, reboot issues have never resurfaced.

I have no clue why, all I can say is there is something odd and this fixed it.
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I monitor my router every day. The IP address for the PC with the music library has always been reserved, and still is. None of the devices has had their IP address changed.
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If all IP addresses for all devices on a network need to be static, then the Sonos setup procedures are grossly incomplete and inadequate.

The iP reservation is to cope with crap routers that give totally new IP addresses on every reboot and/or on every DHCP refresh, one assumes that you have a decent router that does not need this pre-assignment (as do I).
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I monitor my router every day. The IP address for the PC with the music library has always been reserved, and still is. None of the devices has had their IP address changed. As a computer network administrator for a large law firm, I cannot fathom the rationale for the suggestion. If all IP addresses for all devices on a network need to be static, then the Sonos setup procedures are grossly incomplete and inadequate.
Unplug your Sonos devices.

Reboot your router.

Plug your Sonos devices back in to the power.

Investigate in your router’s manual how to assign reserved IP addresses, and do so for all devices on your network.