Manually setting IP addresses

  • 5 December 2012
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43 replies

Userlevel 1
That's how I read it as well: Use the Router to assign IP Addresses.

Generally, the use of static, Appliance-Based IP Addresses is a poor way to execute the 'fix'. Router-Based IP assignment is usually preferred.

However: "If all you have is a hammer, all your problems look like nails."

Best of Luck


Not quite, what I am saying is that you don't need to fix IP addresses in any way (at the router or the client).

The only time its useful is for servers or\and a NAS.

If you have a problem with duplicate IP addresses, just set the lease time to something long.
what I am saying is that you don't need to fix IP addresses in any way (at the router or the client).
You don't have to fix IP addresses for Sonos units and the like, but it avoids the possibility of duplication if a router power-cycles.

The only time its useful is for servers or\and a NAS.

And Sonos devices. Basically anything which communicates across the local subnet.

Devices which simply connect out to the Internet are still prone to the problem, but can always be restarted singly.

If you have a problem with duplicate IP addresses, just set the lease time to something long.

Setting a huge lease time won't avoid duplication when a router power-cycles and its DHCP server loses its memory. In fact it could be argued that a long lease time could make things a lot worse, as it would take that much longer for dupes to naturally shake themselves out of the system.
I stick with my post (#24) above. It works for me so don't see what the fuss is about!
Userlevel 1
I stick with my post (#24) above. It works for me so don't see what the fuss is about!

Its not about making a fuss, its just that if you ask anyone who runs a network (that has any kind of clue anyway) they will tell you the same thing I am.

Just trying to save you some work and hassle.

I have somewhere around 20 connected network devices at home and have done for a good 10 years, I don't reserve any IPs except for my WHS and have never had a duplicate IP address. Admittedly I don't have many power cuts.

Like someone said before, there is almost never a real world scenario which needs you to reserve all your IP addresses.

But if you want to spend time doing something which is unnecessary, go right ahead.
Depends on the situations of each person. I NEEDED to reserve a handful of my devices, as I kept getting conflicts when firing everything up after an outage. And even occasionally after a Sonos update and the devices came up, a computer would show an IP conflict on reboot.

In my case, reserving the IPs over .x.200 for Sonos and my NAS worked for me. But, I also have 48 devices showing up on my network.

Like someone said before, there is almost never a real world scenario which needs you to reserve all your IP addresses.


If you are quoting me then you got it wrong.

I said "There are almost no real-world scenarios where using manually configured IP addresses makes sense over using static DHCP assignments."

I fully support using static IP address assignments, especially if using your router to assign IP addresses. My point is this should be done using DHCP reservations in almost all cases. Certainly as far as Sonos devices is concerned, there's no reason to need the ability to manually configure IP addresses into Sonos hardware.

A good DHCP server will store the details of all IP addresss leases across a restart and will use these to avoid issuing duplicates after the restart. Most routers (especially consumer grade ones) are not good DHCP servers in this respect.

With a typical home router, if you restart the router you lose all knowledge of existing leases. That means when a new request comes in the router can issue a duplicate. In some routers, which start assigning from same place each time, the chances of a duplicate IP after a router restart is close to 100%.

The solution to this is to reserve specific IP addresses for devices in the router.

If, like me, you are running a decent DHCP server than remembers the leases across reboots, then there is no reason to do this unless you have a burning need to specifically address a Sonos zoneplayer by a known IP address.

Cheers,

Keith
Userlevel 2
So I would probably be one of the very small handful that prefers static IP? All of my devices on my network use static IP and hate having to run a DHCP server for just my Sonos equipment.

Would it be worthwhile to request this feature via future firmware update (the ability for us to choose whether we want to use DHCP or Static)?
Would it be worthwhile to request this feature via future firmware update (the ability for us to choose whether we want to use DHCP or Static)?

Probably not. Sonos is designed around UPnP, which requires DHCP:

The foundation for UPnP networking is IP addressing. Each device must implement a DHCP client and search for a DHCP server when the device is first connected to the network. If no DHCP server is available, the device must assign itself an address.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Plug_and_Play

My suggestion is to reserve IP addresses in your router setup by assigning them to the MAC addresses of your Sonos devices. This gives the same result as static IPs, but still uses DHCP.
Address management may be a Good Thing but why in this day and age why would you want to do so by tinkering with each and every device on the network individually when you can simply configure a server?
Userlevel 2
Address management may be a Good Thing but why in this day and age why would you want to do so by tinkering with each and every device on the network individually when you can simply configure a server?

Organization and makes Natting easier. You would only have to tinker with it once, set it and forget it as you'll never have any IP conflict problems going forward

UPnP does work without DHCP and is not a requirement (if not then most of my media currently being shared on my network wouldn't work at all).
UPnP does work without DHCP and is not a requirement (if not then most of my media currently being shared on my network wouldn't work at all).

Not if it uses Auto-IP. Auto-IP assumes DHCP, and if the server is not there, it will Auto-IP. In order for Sonos to be used sans internet/router (which many people do), you need Auto-IP.

The fact is, there is no longer any advantage to static IP. Before DHCP reservation it may have helped in some cases, but no longer. Either you set a static IP once, or you set a DHCP reservation once. No difference between the two except, if you ever have to make changes, it is much easier to access a central router/server than it is to access every individual device.
Organization and makes Natting easier.
All of which is simpler from a central point where you can be sure you don't accidentally create conflicts.

If you don't run a local DNS forwarder and are actually configuring external DNS addresses into each device then swapping between DNS servers must be one hell of chore.

All a bit last century IMHO.
Userlevel 2
All of which is simpler from a central point where you can be sure you don't accidentally create conflicts.

If you don't run a local DNS forwarder and are actually configuring external DNS addresses into each device then swapping between DNS servers must be one hell of chore.

All a bit last century IMHO.


Why would you need to swap DNS address's? I've never had to switch any and my network is up and running since 1991 (aside from it being a lot larger than when I first started it).

I agree, if you want the easy way out and don't want to have to deal with configuring your network... sure DHCP server makes that possible.

Yeah you can also use address reservation but there's always room for error.

When you are outside your network and want to hop into a particular machine, you don't want to cross your fingers and hope that you are getting into the right one... you would want it to be the correct one with the correct IP address everytime. (yes address reversation can fix that too, if you're going to use that... might as well go static... takes roughly the same amount of time to set it up)

I don't like having to rely on one device for my whole network (ie the router or whatever is running the DHCP). I like everything to be able to run on its own and be individually setup and usable. If my router goes down... no big deal, all my devices have their own IP address's and my switches are more than adequate to allow for my network to continue to function fully (aside from being able to access the WAN).
if you want the easy way out and don't want to have to deal with configuring your network... sure DHCP server makes that possible.
But I do want to deal with configuring my network. I reserve addresses for all my fixed components and most regular mobile visitors, and I occasionally change external DNS servers. All managed from a central location.

But, hey, if you want to do things the old hair shirt way that's your call. Just don't expect Sonos to cater for that mode of operation: it would needlessly compound the support issues they'd have to deal with.
Userlevel 2
Just don't expect Sonos to cater for that mode of operation: it would needlessly compound the support issues they'd have to deal with.

But it wouldn't really add anything extra to their support. Just like most other devices, they are by default set to DHCP unless manually changed by the user. Just give both options as every other device that's I've used provides.
But it wouldn't really add anything extra to their support. Just like most other devices, they are by default set to DHCP unless manually changed by the user. Just give both options as every other device that's I've used provides.

Your other devices have no need to Auto-IP for UPnP streaming, Sonos does.
So I would probably be one of the very small handful that prefers static IP? All of my devices on my network use static IP and hate having to run a DHCP server for just my Sonos equipment.

Would it be worthwhile to request this feature via future firmware update (the ability for us to choose whether we want to use DHCP or Static)?

I also prefer static addressing, Save a lot of hassle if you know what your doing in a controlled environment. One situation I have discovered that requires static addressing is as follows:
I have 2.4G wifi and a netgear AC750 wifi extendor
I send text to speech commands to my Sonos One via i.p addressing
I need Sonos One to always have the same i.p address
I need to have only one one SSID name broadcast (main wifi router and netgear extender wifi as i have a wireless robot vaccume with a static i.p address that I need to send commands via wifi and roams around the house cleaning and can not change wifi SSID)
When the Sono connects to the wireless via the netgear extender it gets a dhcp lease and a vitrual mac address is assigned by the netgear wifi extender
When the Sonos connects to the wireless via the main wifi router it gets a dhcp lease and the origional Sonos mac address is assigned
You can only assign one mac adress per i.p address in dhcp reservation

So the symptoms of the issue are sometimes the sending of the text to speech works and sometime is does not work. Having the ability to set a static address assignment on the wifi connecting device resolves this issue. There are of course other option but less desirable.