Manually setting IP addresses

  • 5 December 2012
  • 43 replies
  • 42204 views

I've searched the forums and can't find a way to manually set the IP addresses to my Sonos devices. Is there a link to easily achieve this? Thank you.

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43 replies

There is no option to set fixed IP addresses directly on your Sonos devices, however if your router supports the function you can set fixed addresses via DHCP using the MAC addresses of the devices. On my Draytek router this is function is called "bind IP address to MAC".
Userlevel 1
I've searched the forums and can't find a way to manually set the IP addresses to my Sonos devices. Is there a link to easily achieve this? Thank you.

Can I ask why you would want to?

If you have an issue with DHCP, you probably have a bigger netwok issue.
Can I ask why you would want to?

It helps keep IP Addresses for Sonos devices from being duplicated (with other network units) when resetting/rebooting the router. It prevents duplication of IP addresses and possible wireless interference.

It also makes it easy to find certain network appliances such a NAS or Printer if it has a fixed IP address.

If you have an issue with DHCP, you probably have a bigger netwok issue.

A possibility, yes. But more than likely it prevents some networks problems before they arise.

Best of Luck
Can I ask why you would want to?

If you have an issue with DHCP, you probably have a bigger netwok issue.


Router reboots, due to upgrades or power outages, often cause DHCP problems, usually in the form of duplicate IP addresses. This won't affect things like computers or phones, which are on and off all the time. However, an always on device, like Sonos, will suffer, especially after a reboot, when it tries to claim its former address which is now in use by another device. So, if you reserve the addresses for Sonos on your router, Sonos and only Sonos devices will get the assigned IP, thus keeping them up and running after a router reboot.
It helps keep IP Addresses for Sonos devices from being duplicated (with other network units) when resetting/rebooting the router. It prevents duplication of IP addresses and possible wireless interference.

It also makes it easy to find certain network appliances such a NAS or Printer if it has a fixed IP address.


Static assignment via DHCP also does this.


But more than likely it prevents some networks problems before they arise.


There are almost no real-world scenarios where using manually configured IP addresses makes sense over using static DHCP assignments. I have heard many arguments (including on this forum) for it, but they all have been the result of broken networks or broken thinking (or both).

I have long and painful personal experiences of supporting IP networks with manually configured IP addresses.

It is a complete nightmare! For every 1 person who knows what they are doing, there are 1000 who don't and will, at some point, mess it up.

The availability of DHCP in CPE equipment is one of the key factors that drove widespread adoption of the Internet. Prior to that dealing with the manual addressing issues was messy and expensive.

If Sonos supported manual configuration of IP addresses in their kit (regardless of how deeply hidden in menus it was) it would almost certainly increase their support costs by a multiple of 10, and for no good reason.

Cheers,

Keith
Static assignment via DHCP also does this.

Maybe I was less than clear.

Using one's Router to assign reserved IP Addresses was what I was (obviously poorly) describing - rather than individually creating static IP Addresses within each appliance.

Best of Luck
Maybe I was less then clear.

Using one's Router to assign reserved IP Addresses was what I was (obviously poorly) describing - rather than individually creating static IP Addresses within each appliance.

Best of Luck


If it's any consolation, I understood what you were describing. 😉
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There are almost no real-world scenarios where using manually configured IP addresses makes sense over using static DHCP assignments.

Am I to conclude that you're opposed to manually setting IP adresses via DHCP using the MAC addresses of the devices?
If it's any consolation, I understood what you were describing. ;)

Thanks. :D

But I do see Majik's reply as valid and as further clarification.

My initial response could confuse a reader as to whether I was referring to Router-based IP reservations or Appliance-based static IP Addresses.

I do understand the importance of the distinction.

Best of Luck
Am I to conclude that you're opposed to manually setting IP adresses via DHCP using the MAC addresses of the devices?

I don't think it matters from a functional and administrative standpoint whether you picked the IPs yourself and told the router to always use them, or let the router choose them and then told it to keep using them.

Maybe I didn't catch your point there.
Can I ask why you would want to?


I have 39 devices on my network with IP addresses, and sporadically get duplicate IP address warnings, so want to organize the network a little better.

When I go into Help, About on the Desktop controller, I am seeing a 'serial number' line for each of the Sonos devices. Is that the mac address? Looks like it is, but there is a 😶 after each one (x being some digit). I would assume I use the numbers before the colon when entering the mac address in DHCP?

Thank you.
BlueCrystalMan,

Yes the MAC address is most of the serial number, and maybe this is the MAC address actually used. Unfortunately, they are different for wireless and wired. (by one hex number)

On my router I can pull up a list of clients from the DHCP reservation setp and simply click on the addresses that I want to reserve. As long as the SONOS units don't flip between wired and wireless, you'll be fine.

Note that the reservation table is finite and I've seen some routers that top out in the 30 client range.
Thanks, buzz. Yes, that was the mac address. I neglected to mention that I'm running Windows 2008 Server, and that is serving up the DHCP. Once I realized its not a problem to add a reservation, I gave it a shot and it worked.

I use a free tool called WakeMeOnLan, and that shows all IP and MAC addresses on the network. Makes organizing things a lot easier and clearer. A Google search will bring it up first if anyone is interested in it. Its primary purpose is to remotely turn on computers, but it gives a really nice display of all addresses/computers on your network. It will show conflicts, also.
Note that the reservation table is finite and I've seen some routers that top out in the 30 client range.

I found this limitation the hard way. After my router would not let me reserve more than 25 IP Addresses. I then had to go back and re-shuffle my reservation scheme.

At least, now all my Sonos appliances (ZPs, ZBs, NAS, Controllers, etc.) have reserved IPs and can withstand the intermittent power drops in our area.

BTW - I have a D-Link DIR-655 Gigabit Router. Could not find any (easy) documentation that listed the IP reservation limit.

Best of Luck
Good point about the handheld controller, Buegie... I'm not sure I see that in my IP list. Does it have its own IP?
Good point about the handheld controller, Buegie... I'm not sure I see that in my IP list. Does it have its own IP?

Yes the CR200 (and 100) have MAC Addresses, and would get their own IP Address. A good thing to reserve their IP as well. I have read here that some find their Controller is quicker when they reserve an IP via the router.

Like all Sonos products, the MAC is a subset of the serial number. Just use the first 12 alphanumerics of the serial number from the Controller. That should do it.

Best of Luck
It was easy to pick out the bridge and three ZPs in my system, as they were labeled Sonos, Inc. for the adapter type. How do I know which device is the controller? It doesn't show up in under Help, About either.
It was easy to pick out the bridge and three ZPs in my system, as they were labeled Sonos, Inc. for the adapter type. How do I know which device is the controller? It doesn't show up in under Help, About either.

If you go into the actual Controller's 'Help/About' menu, you should find its information (MAC/SN) there.

I believe that using another Sonos appliance will not list the Controller. I could be wrong about that, though. I'm at work and not able to verify my recollection.

I cannot remember how I initially determined the Controller's SN/MAC. I believe it is on the original box and on the back (or battery case inside) of the Controller as well.

Best of Luck
Thanks. It was on the bottom of the controller.

It doesn't show in that WakeMeOnLan toy I talked about earlier... not sure why. But I'm all set now. Thanks, man.
One more thing... Any idea how to reset the controller so it rejoins the network with its new IP?
A few points here.

1/ Sonos MAC addresses all start with 00:0E:58 so they're not hard to identify.
2/ The MAC which the router sees requesting the IP is the wired MAC for players/bridges; or the only MAC if it's a CRx00
3/ Nirsoft's Wireless Network Watcher sees all devices (so long as controllers are awake).
4/ To pick up the new IP simply restart the device. You may need to have previously restarted the DHCP server (router).
Userlevel 1
Static assignment via DHCP also does this.




There are almost no real-world scenarios where using manually configured IP addresses makes sense over using static DHCP assignments. I have heard many arguments (including on this forum) for it, but they all have been the result of broken networks or broken thinking (or both).

I have long and painful personal experiences of supporting IP networks with manually configured IP addresses.

It is a complete nightmare! For every 1 person who knows what they are doing, there are 1000 who don't and will, at some point, mess it up.

The availability of DHCP in CPE equipment is one of the key factors that drove widespread adoption of the Internet. Prior to that dealing with the manual addressing issues was messy and expensive.

If Sonos supported manual configuration of IP addresses in their kit (regardless of how deeply hidden in menus it was) it would almost certainly increase their support costs by a multiple of 10, and for no good reason.

Cheers,

Keith


I agree completely.

Everyone should just save themselves some time and headache and just go DHCP.

The only exception to that is a NAS or Home Server if you really want to.

In the event that you have a power cut and the Router drops its database of IPs, just reboot your clients and they should go back and query the DHCP server again.
I agree completely.

Everyone should just save themselves some time and headache and just go DHCP.

The only exception to that is a NAS or Home Server if you really want to.

In the event that you have a power cut and the Router drops its database of IPs, just reboot your clients and they should go back and query the DHCP server again.

Not sure I follow your logic here? You agree that fixed IPs are not necessary but then go on to say that in the event of a power cut to router "just reboot your clients and they should go back and query the DHCP server again". Well if you have several wireless clients - I have about 15 - I really don't want to have the bother of going round the house doing that thank you! I have all fixed IPs, have had several power interuptions to the router and never had to reboot a single client.
You agree that fixed IPs are not necessary ...
That wasn't how I read it. TheOtherMe was evidently agreeing with Majik that the correct place to fix IPs was in the DHCP server.
That wasn't how I read it. TheOtherMe was evidently agreeing with Majik that the correct place to fix IPs was in the DHCP server.

That's how I read it as well: Use the Router to assign IP Addresses.

Generally, the use of static, Appliance-Based IP Addresses is a poor way to execute the 'fix'. Router-Based IP assignment is usually preferred.

However: "If all you have is a hammer, all your problems look like nails."

Best of Luck