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I have a 10 speaker SONOS set-up in a restaurant, having trouble at peak hours

  • 27 February 2018
  • 5 replies
  • 707 views

We're running 10 Sonos players in a restaurant and around peak hours the songs "skip" like records. Is there any known issue with too many devices interfering with the players?

We pay for the premium versions of Spotify, Apple Music, Pandora, and Amazon Music and this problem occurs across all services. Our guests are not on our WiFi network, but could even just having phones on cause havoc?
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Best answer by pwt 27 February 2018, 16:37

Actual human bodies can cause WiFi issues -- they're mostly water and as such are pretty good absorbers of 2.4GHz WiFi radio signals. The more people, the more absorption.

You may want to describe the installation in more detail -- what devices you have, their proximity to one another, which are wired, etc. Depending on the answer, it could be that introducing a wired BOOST, or wiring additional devices, might help.
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Userlevel 7
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Actual human bodies can cause WiFi issues -- they're mostly water and as such are pretty good absorbers of 2.4GHz WiFi radio signals. The more people, the more absorption.

You may want to describe the installation in more detail -- what devices you have, their proximity to one another, which are wired, etc. Depending on the answer, it could be that introducing a wired BOOST, or wiring additional devices, might help.
I figured that was going to be a solution. I do want to get a wired boost, but it's a brick building from the 1880's, hard to conceal wires now.
Userlevel 7
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You don't actually need to buy a boost. The key here is you need to plug one of the Sonos units into your router so it is running Sonosnet and not off your standard wifi signal. With Sonosnet they will communicate with each other instead of all back to the router.
Hello, do you share wifi? If sonos and customers use the same wifi - I guess, it may have influance especially during peak period.
Userlevel 7
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when you have no Sonos unit hooked to your router all the Sonos units are working off your router wifi (along with customers and everyone else).

If you hook a single Sonos unit to router. Then all the music connections go wired from your router to that master (bridge) Sonos device and then it communicates on its own wifi (Sonos mesh wifi where every sonos unit is a repeater and they speak direct with each other).

The Sonosnet method takes all that music traffic off your router wifi. And the mesh network with Sonosnet is much more robust then your standard router wifi because each Sonos unit is repeating the signal.

When you hook a Sonos unit to router - Sonosnet will automatically update. You then need to go into your Sonos app and go to settings...advanced.... and set the wifi channel for Sonosnet (you want it to be on a channel at least 5 removed from what your router wifi channel is (ie only use Channels 1, 6 or 11 with Sonosnet on one of those and your router on another).

The bridge/boost Sonos device is primarily for if none of your sonos speakers are near the router you can make required single the connection with one of those.