Answered

How do you set a static IP on a Sonos player?

  • 8 November 2015
  • 23 replies
  • 20883 views

Badge
I keep seeing recommendation that one "reserve an IP" for the Sonos. I assume this means use a static IP? How do you do that? I can't find anything in the settings menu?

Thanks1
icon

Best answer by ratty 8 November 2015, 11:38

What do I look under?
The DHCP server configuration. You'll want to create mappings between MAC addresses and IP addresses. Usually the MAC addresses of the Sonos devices will already be in the DHCP client lease table. If not you can use the serial number, printed on the Sonos device itself or available via About My Sonos System, minus the last character and its preceding colon.

IP reservation in the DHCP server is the preferred way of fixing IP addresses. Use of static IPs, configured directly into the device itself, is error-prone and deprecated other than for certain fixed network devices such as the router itself. Sonos doesn't support the latter method.
View original

This topic has been closed for further comments. You can use the search bar to find a similar topic, or create a new one by clicking Create Topic at the top of the page.

23 replies

Userlevel 6
Badge +3
Hi robokitty,

Welcome to the Sonos community,

You do not do that in Sonos you do that on your router. You need to have a look at your router guide to see how.

Les
Badge
I'm pretty good with routers, but I don't know what to look for. What do I look under?
For a how to with Apple routers see:
https://en.community.sonos.com/ask-a-question-228987/best-airport-settings-6732655
Seeing that may guide you on doing this on any router, if you are good with them.
I don't know enough about static IP but I do know that this is different from reserved. Reserving in the manner I have described is adequate to prevent IP address conflicts.
What do I look under?
The DHCP server configuration. You'll want to create mappings between MAC addresses and IP addresses. Usually the MAC addresses of the Sonos devices will already be in the DHCP client lease table. If not you can use the serial number, printed on the Sonos device itself or available via About My Sonos System, minus the last character and its preceding colon.

IP reservation in the DHCP server is the preferred way of fixing IP addresses. Use of static IPs, configured directly into the device itself, is error-prone and deprecated other than for certain fixed network devices such as the router itself. Sonos doesn't support the latter method.
Badge
Ah thanks! yes, mac address IP makes total sense. I get it. And, yeah, I get that static IP doesn't work on a device that doesn't have a UI on the device. It works fine on my network printer, but that has buttons and a little LCD.

Thanks again - I'll see if my router has this feature, and if so make it happen.
Ah thanks! yes, mac address IP makes total sense. I get it. And, yeah, I get that static IP doesn't work on a device that doesn't have a UI on the device. It works fine on my network printer, but that has buttons and a little LCD.

It's really not a good idea to set a static IP on the printer, your router will have no idea that the IP address in use and will happily hand out that address to another device, causing a conflict, unless you've chosen an address outside the router's DHCP range, which I'm guessing since you didn't know anything about the router's config pages you probably haven't done.
Badge
whoa there charlie, I most certainly do know how to pick an IP outside the DHCP range. And the reason I did it is that the printer manufacturer said to do it in the instruction manual for how to set up the Windows drivers so that the drivers can find the printer. OK - I accept your apology ;-)

Now, for the Sonos components, I do have a question. Since each sonos component had a wireless adapter, and a wired one, I'm going to assume that they each have a unique MAC, just like my computers do? But, as the instructions you linked point out, the "About My Sonos" UI only shows one MAC address?

What's the story here?

Thanks
About My Sonos System shows the serial number, which is the internal MAC (plus an additional character). This is the MAC used for IP reservation.

The 2.4GHz wireless MAC is +1 with respect to the internal MAC. (PLAYBAR's 5GHz MAC is offset by +2.)
Badge
So - translated in to amateur's terms, just associate the listed mac with a free IP outside the DHCP range, and "some network magic" will make the this all work, even though under the covers it's more complicated. Yes?
Yes, but there's no magic involved (unless you include Clarke's Third Law in the discussion). When asked for an IP by that MAC the DHCP server will simply hand out the defined fixed one rather than dynamically allocating one from the pool range.
whoa there charlie, I most certainly do know how to pick an IP outside the DHCP range. And the reason I did it is that the printer manufacturer said to do it in the instruction manual for how to set up the Windows drivers so that the drivers can find the printer. OK - I accept your apology ;-)


Whoa there Charlie, it's not that much of a reach, given you didn't know where to look for DHCP reservations in your router, it's not much of an assumption to imagine you wouldn't know what range the router is using for DHCP.
Badge
Yes, but there's no magic involved (unless you include Clarke's Third Law in the discussion). When asked for an IP by that MAC the DHCP server will simply hand out the defined fixed one rather than dynamically allocating one from the pool range.

haha - nice one. And now I "get" the model: The sonos presents a single mac to the outside world, so you associate a single IP with it and boom. The "magic" is that sonos is then internally using that single IP to talk to some other network hardware. Not "magic", but a clever abstraction that wasn't immediately obvious to me. so - yeah - Clarke.
Basically. The IP is in fact owned by the internal software bridge (with a small 😎 which links to the external interfaces.
Badge
Got all my sonos devices on a nice range of reserved IP addresses. It's super easy on my linksys router - don't need to type in mac address, just "point and click".

I put mine at 192.168.1.60 .. 1.62. These IP are outside the DHCP range, but within the subnet. Is there any reason not to use reserved IP outside the DHCP range? It seems to work fine.
Is there any reason not to use reserved IP outside the DHCP range?
In most cases that's exactly what you should do, otherwise a dynamically assigned IP could clash.

There are a few routers which allow you to 'pin' a current IP inside the DHCP range, such that it's always used for the device in question.
Badge
There are a few routers which allow you to 'pin' a current IP inside the DHCP range, such that it's always used for the device in question.

I think my LInksys e-4200 does in fact let you do that, because when you click on an active mac to make if reserved it moves it to the reserved list with the existing IP. In any case it's clearly better to use the reserved range, if only to keep more dynamic ones available. So that's what I'll be doing going forward.
Userlevel 2
Hi robokitty,

Welcome to the Sonos community,

You do not do that in Sonos you do that on your router. You need to have a look at your router guide to see how.

Les


this dont work with all routers, ... even common router from t-online and unity media can register a adress. as an smart home integrator I can not recommand sonos. ... its not save and will fail !
Hi robokitty,

Welcome to the Sonos community,

You do not do that in Sonos you do that on your router. You need to have a look at your router guide to see how.

Les


this dont work with all routers, ... even common router from t-online and unity media can register a adress. as an smart home integrator I can not recommand sonos. ... its not save and will fail !


Luckily a smart home integrator would be able to spell and provide their customer with a suitable router.


this dont work with all routers, ... even common router from t-online and unity media can register a adress. as an smart home integrator I can not recommand sonos. ... its not save and will fail !


Despite your dire warning, Sonos has not allowed static IP since its inception over 10 years ago and is doing just fine. To paraphrase Mr. S. L. Clemens, the reports of its demise are greatly exaggerated.
Userlevel 3
Badge +4
I've reserved ip addresses for all my sonos devices. Do I need to do the same for my controllers - phones, tablets etc?

Should I re boot controllers after assigning devices their own ip?
It sure wouldn't hurt to do it for all devices, but it's not required. Most other devices don't rely on a constant signal from the wifi, they can handle disconnects and reconnects much better than streaming music can. But sure, if you're in there, I'd certainly recommend it.

Yes, I'd do a reboot of each device, to flush out it's current address and allow it to get the new assignment from the router.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
I like to keep a small number (10) of open addresses in the pool for the DHCP server to assign from and then manually assign my known devices addresses outside the pool. That lets me identify devices by IP fairly easy as I assign them by groups. It also makes it easy to spot a new or unknown device in the pool range. Not necessary but neater in my opinion.
Userlevel 3
Badge +4
Thanks. I hadn't done a reboot and still have some issues. So they are all still on dynamically assigned ip until i reboot?

Ill power everything down and reboot one by one. Thanks.