Question

Grouping of Speakers to Overcome Drop Outs



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42 replies

Badge +18
you don't need the wifi versions, just basic ethernet.
Userlevel 3
Badge +2
I think I am being a bit of a numoty now- is there any basic difference between the powerline adapter such as the TP link powerline and the Devolo dlan 500 wifi/duo.

I've had the Devolo for ages but it has been of no use whatsoever. I've never been able to get it to work.
Userlevel 7
Badge +20
So upstairs I have the Connect Amp and two pairs of stereo Play 1s. If the power line was connected to the Connect Amp) which sits centrally) the improved signal should provide a boost to the other speakers?
Yes. Or consider connecting the Boost to the upstairs powerline adaptor: in principle, the Boost's wireless hardware should be superior to that in the Connect:Amp. With the powerline adaptor, you should have some options as to where to position the Boost for best effect.
Userlevel 3
Badge +2
Yeah, just noticed it. Thanks 😃
Badge +18
The TP link ones as in my post a few back.
Userlevel 3
Badge +2
Which brand have you used?

Edited: sorry, just. Noted the link.
Badge +18
Argos is easy and cheap, if you get home delivery you can send back easily.
Userlevel 3
Badge +2
Okay, think I understand. Now just to decide what to buy!
Badge +18
Not the same as a boost, the powerline device transmitts your network over the mains and give you an Ethernet port as if its connected to the router abiet slower due to powerline technology.

Not powerline wifi extender, but powerline network extender if that makes sense. These work for me :)

http://www.argos.co.uk/product/5742734
Userlevel 3
Badge +2
Thanks for the suggestions, guys.

Have used devolo power lines to extend my WiFi before I moved to BT but had little success. I guess this is a slightly different solution though. One plug to the router, the other plugging into a speaker.

So upstairs I have the Connect Amp and two pairs of stereo Play 1s. If the power line was connected to the Connect Amp) which sits centrally) the improved signal should provide a boost to the other speakers?

But (and I might be wrong) wouldn't plugging my unused Boost into the Amp achieve the same thing?
Badge +18
Whilst not supported powerline adapters may help you if the wifi connection between the Sonos units upstairs and downstairs is weak.

I live in a large rambling Victorian house with thick walls and every room has an even thicker fireplace. The only way I can get Sonos to be 100% reliable is to use a powerline adapter to get to the furthest bedroom.

Using a wifi scanner I see 32 different wifi networks from neighbours so know its very crowded here, just a case of choosing two channels that are least congested, one for Sonos and one for normal network.

Try the lowest Channel for Sonos, the lower the frequency, the further the RF signal can travel. Whilst this is miniscule at these frequencies it may help.

Keeping the router / boost / sonos soeakers apart a good few feet from each other will help considerably. Too close and the signal can in effect make the reciever of the equipment close hard of hearing:)

Edit PWT beat me to the powerline!
Userlevel 7
Badge +20
Although not recommended or supported by Sonos, I use a powerline adaptor to provide connectivity to the PLAY:5 pair in my kitchen, which has challenges with wireless connectivity to the rest of the house. It works without any issues. (The system is on SonosNet; one PLAY:5 is wired to the powerline adaptor, the other is wireless, receiving its feed from the wired speaker.)

You may want to give this a try between your upper and lower areas.
Userlevel 3
Badge +2
The BOOST has been used as stand alone, not connected to the router. I'd expected it to act like a relay, but it didn't. It didn't do anything.
I'd also used it as a direct connection to the router but the Connect seems to work better.

Just had a thought. Could connect a downstairs speaker to the router to create Sonos Net, in place of connecting it through the Connect. Then reintroduce the BOOST in a more central place to create the relay.

I think neighbour interference is an issue. I think my biggest problem is our flat/apartment is concrete built. I am sure that sometimes I get a better router signal from the downstairs flat than I do between the living room and office.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
I think you would do it in addition to what you already have. But it would be easy enough to disconnect either.

My system has a Bridge and I did find that it was sensitive to being near the router. I moved my router into the cupboard under the stairs and took the Bridge with it. Previously the Bridge had been sitting on top of the router (or rather a shelf above it) and I'd had no problems. In the new place the Sonos system had no end of problems. With support's help we diagnosed interference so now the Bridge is as far as the supplied LAN cable will allow and I have no issues.

I'm not a particular network expert though there are on this board some very knowledgeable on such matters. I'm surprised you say the Boost just provided a network that nothing connected to. What I was thinking was a Boost or Bridge (NOT wired to the router). But I assume your upstairs speaker(s) are connecting to one of the downstairs units if the energy path is more optimal.

Of course it's always worth considering interference in case either you or your neighbours have introduced something that might be upsetting the wireless environment - CCTV cameras, baby monitors, DECT phones.

Do you have your Wi-Fi credentials entered to Sonos. May be worth removing them and force sole use of SonosNet.
Userlevel 3
Badge +2
Thanks for the reply, Staurt_W.

The BOOST did sit between upstairs and downstairs but it didn't actually Boost. What it did was created a different branch on the spanning tree protocol, to which nothing connected. Tried it in every place I could think.

Wiring an upstairs speaker to the router could be a runner. Would you do it in addition to the Connect/Router set up I have, or instead of?

Thanks for the suggestion.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
You could try getting another Bridge or Boost and placing it between the upstairs and downstairs.

You could try wiring one of the upstairs units to the router.

Might also be worth looking at access points though they don't always play well with Sonos
Userlevel 3
Badge +2
I guess no one has had a similar problem!

Dropouts continue this morning, though it has now settled.

Limited in what I can do now- spent so much money on this system, generally love it- but at this moment in time its heading for the back garden via the second floor window.

I'm running Sonos Net, I've followed every suggestion from support following 8 or 9 diagnostic submissions, I've reserved the IP addresses for each speaker (even though support said I don't need to do that), I've unreserved them for a while, I've-re-reserved them, I've added the Boost, relocated it and taken it out completely.

Please, any thing else I can do????