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Google Pixel no longer connecting to Sonos


My android 7.1.2 Google Pixel is no longer able to find the Sonos component. My Windows PC and both iPads are working fine. This just started (I've been able to connect until two days ago from my phone). I've tried reinstalling the software on the phone, rebooting the phone and the Play One, changing the Wifi channels (using 11 for the 2.4 Ghz network now), forgetting and reconnecting to the Wifi network on my phone, and trying airplane mode on and off and still no joy. I've submitted diagnostics 7302023. Can you please take a look and let me know what the issue is and how to remedy?
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Best answer by ratty 15 April 2017, 16:12

The problem is generally with routers refusing to forward broadcast traffic between their two wireless segments. In your case it sounds like there could be a device-specific factor too. Sonos uses the standard SSDP protocol to locate and identify the players.

Attaching a BOOST (or any other wired Sonos unit) solves this problem. Players are then on the wired segment and should be accessible to a controller device on either WiFi segment.
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As a follow-up, I find that my Pixel app sees the Play One when it is connected directly to my ethernet switch. As soon as I go back to a Wifi connection on the Sonos the phone loses the ability to find the device. All my other devices see the Sonos device perfectly with either connection setup.
Ensure that the Pixel is connecting to your router's 2.4GHz WiFi. In some cases a device connected to 5GHz will have trouble discovering a Sonos system in 'Standard Setup' (WiFi mode).
I don't really have that option (unless I turn off the 5Ghz band which I don't really want to do since I have Gigabit fiber and want to utilize the speed of the network). However, both my iPads are also connecting to the 5Ghz band and have no problem connecting to the Sonos. What's really strange is that my Pixel has always connected to the 5Ghz band and yet it worked fine up until a couple of days ago. I'm thinking another option that might work is to add a Boost and force the Sonos onto its own network since I was able to see the Sonos speaker when I had it plugged into the Ethernet switch. I understand that Boost provides for a more stable environment throughout as well.
Ratty, your answer is correct (strange as I find it). I went back in and reconfigured my wireless router to serve up the 2.4Ghz network and 5Ghz networks on separate SSIDs and then forced my Pixel onto the 2.4Ghz network and voila - my Sonos network was visible again and I could control my speakers. I'll keep this setup and just connect my iPads to the 5Ghz network since their Sonos apps don't seem to care whether their on the same wireless network. I may still invest in a boost for the stability and then I can go back to using a combined 2.4/5 single SSID and let future devices use whichever network is best for speed and stability. Thanks!
The problem is generally with routers refusing to forward broadcast traffic between their two wireless segments. In your case it sounds like there could be a device-specific factor too. Sonos uses the standard SSDP protocol to locate and identify the players.

Attaching a BOOST (or any other wired Sonos unit) solves this problem. Players are then on the wired segment and should be accessible to a controller device on either WiFi segment.
One more really weird follow-up. After changing to split SSID mynet and mynet5 for instance, I can connect my Pixel to mynet 5 (the 5Ghz) network and now it sees the Sonos again. I'm going to leave it this way for awhile and see if the problem recurs or if it is an issue where the router serves up one common SSID and password for both bandwidths and allows the device to connect to the best choice. For now I have everything working again with all devices capable of running on the 5Ghz spectrum doing so while my IOT devices run on 2.4.
If the Sonos controller had discovered the players via the 2.4GHz SSID, then the device was moved to the 5GHz segment, it would usually still work. It already knows the IP addresses of the players from the earlier discovery.
Does the Sonos app store the IP of a discovered network for the next time the app is opened to speed connection? If that is the case, if the Sonos device is unplugged and then receives a new IP via DHCP, you're thinking the Sonos app won't be able to discover it on the Android unless I switch back to 2.4Ghz? Maybe I should assign the Sonos network a static IP on my router so that the app won't need to discover it every time.
The controller app would cache IP info whilst it's in the background. It would lose the IPs if the controller app was force-exited (for which you'd need to remove the notification and the app from overview/recent). I don't suppose it does a full discovery otherwise unless/until it's restarted, since it simply needs to maintain contact with the known players.

When a new player starts it will broadcast its appearance to other players and live controllers. Equally when a player goes offline a controller will time it out if it hasn't been heard from for a while.

A player which requests an IP renewal via DHCP will under most circumstances simply be granted a new lease on the same IP. Some routers will hash the MAC to derive the IP, so a freshly started device may always end up with the same IP regardless of reservation.

In general it's recommended practice to reserve IPs in the router anyway, for Sonos players and controlling devices. It reduces uncertainties should, say, a router restart.
Okay, I've assigned the Sonos Play One to always receive a reserved IP from the router. That should take care of the issue once the app has found it the first time. Thanks, Ratty!