Question

Fixed IP addresses

  • 1 January 2018
  • 12 replies
  • 14408 views

Userlevel 3
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I wonder if anyone can enlighten me on this subject please.
I have read a number of threads which state that static IP addresses for your Sonos gear, helps to stabilise the system.
I have a Playbar, 2 x Play 1's (surround set up), and 2 stand alone Play One units. All these are connected to a Sonos Boost unit.
I have attached (hopefully) what I see when I look at my router. There are what appear to be three addresses.
Could someone tell me what I am looking at with regard to my Sonos gear and how static IP addresses would be assigned. I have been having the 2 xPLay 1's (surround) drop out occasionally.
Thank You


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12 replies

The MAC address is the key. Somewhere in your router setup, you will be able to assign a permanent fixed IP address to a particular MAC address. Those are the MAC addresses you wish to assign a fixed IP address.
Userlevel 7
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What you see there are the addresses that your Sonos devices - two players and a Bridge or Boost - are currently using on your network. Some routers don't maintain that information when they are rebooted, so if your router were to reboot and it loses that data, your router could potentially give another device one of those same IP addresses, causing a conflict, and thus problems.

If your router has some way to reserve those addresses (most do, though the location of that setting may be in a different place), they would be saved in the router, and THAT data should certainly be preserved following a reboot. Your Sonos devices would always have the same addresses, and nothing else would be able to be given them either (unless something happened to be impersonating one of your Sonos devices, in which case you probably have bigger issues).

In reserving the addresses, some routers may offer a button to simply save it, and will pre-fill out the form with all of the current information. Other routers might make you manually fill out the form, in which case like jgatie said, the MAC address is the key to getting it saved.
Userlevel 3
Badge +4
What you see there are the addresses that your Sonos devices - two players and a Bridge or Boost - are currently using on your network. Some routers don't maintain that information when they are rebooted, so if your router were to reboot and it loses that data, your router could potentially give another device one of those same IP addresses, causing a conflict, and thus problems.

If your router has some way to reserve those addresses (most do, though the location of that setting may be in a different place), they would be saved in the router, and THAT data should certainly be preserved following a reboot. Your Sonos devices would always have the same addresses, and nothing else would be able to be given them either (unless something happened to be impersonating one of your Sonos devices, in which case you probably have bigger issues).

In reserving the addresses, some routers may offer a button to simply save it, and will pre-fill out the form with all of the current information. Other routers might make you manually fill out the form, in which case like jgatie said, the MAC address is the key to getting it saved.


Not sure I understand correctly. You say my router is showing the addresses of my devices - two players and a Boost. But I have 5 players and a Boost. That's what is confusing me.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
Well, that's all that is in your screenshot... two players and a Boost. I'm sure you have more than just those devices on your network... there should be entries for anything on your network that is getting an address from your router... cell phones, tablets, computers... it's likely that other devices are splitting up the remaining Sonos devices... but if they're on and working, they should be listed there.
Userlevel 3
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That again is part of my confusion. My router is showing those 3 addresses only but I have 5 speakers
But, as you say, the 2 PLAY:1s are dropping out. And, as your router says, this appears to be due to the fact that they have duplicate IP addresses, and currently (when you took the screenshot), aren't connected to your router.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
Go to each Sonos device and get the MAC address off of the label, pick an open range of IP addresses on your LAN, ones outside your dynamic assignment window. I reserve a group of 10 to leave a bit of room if I expand my system to avoid renumbering.

Assign one of your IP addresses to each of your Sonos devices using the MAC to IP configuration page of your router. You didn't say what brand and model router it is so I can't tell you how to find that page.

Unplug all your Sonos devices. Reboot the router. Give things 5 minutes to settle down and all your other gear to get their dynamic IP addresses sorted out.

Turn on your boost and let it boot up.

Connect your web browser to the Boost using the IP address you assigned it. http://IP-Address:1400/status

That will let you know the Boost has powered up and been assigned the expected address.

Turn on each of your other Sonos components and try to connect to them.

This one at a time process is a bit time consuming but it will help you catch any errors in entering the MAC to IP assignments. Once you have everything showing up in the browser at the right address you won't have to do this boot and check again, the router will happily assign the correct IP to each Sonos device any time it is needed.

You might also consider naming your Sonos devices if your router offers that as an option. I find hooking to http://sonoszb:1400/status much easier than hooking to http://172.16.1.40:1400/status

You can also make a Sonos Bookmark folder and save the various Sonos management pages for each device in it to make things even easier.
Userlevel 7
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Stanley's instructions are the way to go.

Regarding the mac address on label:

The serial number on your unit should be the mac address

The serial number should be in format

#### AA-BB-CC-DD-EE-FF-##
Mac address is AA:BB:CC: DD:EE:FF
Userlevel 3
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Thanks for all the replies. I will have a go at this at the weekend.
Userlevel 3
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unfortunately it doesn't seem as if I can achieve the fixed addresses easily. I am in the UK and have a BT Home Hub 6. It does allow me to fix IP addresses, but only the addresses the router has already allocated to individual devices, and then it doesn't always work. So between them, Sonos and BT have me snookered! I can always get another router, but a. its a pain in the but to have to set up everything in our house again, and b. spend even more money on trying to get a stable Sonos setup. Whilst I like Sonos a lot, and have invested what to me is a vast some of cash in their speakers, if I were starting again I would have to think seriously if all this hassle was worth the end result.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
I found this topic from April 2017 about the BT Home Hub 6. It seems like there were issues back then with IP address duplication and inability to save/reserve addresses... at least on some models of it. It sounds like the issues are BT's to fix, since it's their router... or if possible, you could invest in a separate router, or disable the DHCP server on the HH6 and have something else serve up DHCP addresses instead (an old router, or run a DHCP server program on a computer... some NAS devices even have that ability) if you wanted to go that far...
Userlevel 7
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If you can disable the DHCP service in the BT you could add something as simple as a cheap and small Raspberry Pi computer to act as your DHCP server and it will do a fine job.