Answered

Connect Amp to a Audio Techica Sound Dropping in and out

  • 2 February 2019
  • 18 replies
  • 203 views

Hi I have just connected my Connect Amp to a Audio Technica (AT-LP60-BT), when playing through my two Play:1's the sound drops in and out on both. I have followed previous community advice and restarted router, unplugged devices, started up again. Even reserving static IP addresses for each device, then restarted everything. Still have the same issue?
icon

Best answer by Ken_Griffiths 2 February 2019, 13:02

Ah right, you can perhaps also try the below, to see if it works for you. That’s if you prefer to not compress the line-in audio. It may work in some instances:

In the Sonos Controller mobile app, switch back to 'Uncompressed', and in the 'Line-In Source Name' for your turntable's Line-In, choose 'Airplay Device'. This changes the buffer depth to ~500ms, which may be enough to deal with temporary interruptions you were seeing with your turntable.
View original

This topic has been closed for further comments. You can use the search bar to find a similar topic, or create a new one by clicking Create Topic at the top of the page.

18 replies

Have you moved the switch on the rear of the turntable to LINE. This engages the turntable’s internal RIAA magnetic phono preamp? I understand the turntable uses built in Bluetooth ... is there a switch to turn off that radio? ... if not, move the turntable away from the Connect Amp to prevent any likelihood of wireless interference.
Yes have it on the LINE setting. After writing my question found the needle in the haystack of solutions to the question. Turns out I need to turn Audio Compression from Automatic to Compressed.
Ah right, you can perhaps also try the below, to see if it works for you. That’s if you prefer to not compress the line-in audio. It may work in some instances:

In the Sonos Controller mobile app, switch back to 'Uncompressed', and in the 'Line-In Source Name' for your turntable's Line-In, choose 'Airplay Device'. This changes the buffer depth to ~500ms, which may be enough to deal with temporary interruptions you were seeing with your turntable.
Hey Ken thanks for following up, turning the compression off and changing it over to Airplay Device seemed to have made things worse. Seems like it's going to have to be the previous route.
...actually take that back. I did a quick restart after making the amendments you suggested, seems to work quite nicely. Thanks Ken, you're a legend.
...actually take that back. I did a quick restart after making the amendments you suggested, seems to work quite nicely. Thanks Ken, you're a legend.I just simply reiterate (er... plagiarise) what others here have already stumbled upon, it's no more than that really. ?

Anyhow, glad it works and you still have the option of using compression, if you ever encounter issues in the future.?
Userlevel 7
Badge +20
In the Sonos Controller mobile app, switch back to 'Uncompressed', and in the 'Line-In Source Name' for your turntable's Line-In, choose 'Airplay Device'. This changes the buffer depth to ~500ms, which may be enough to deal with temporary interruptions you were seeing with your turntable.
That text looks familiar 😃
In the Sonos Controller mobile app, switch back to 'Uncompressed', and in the 'Line-In Source Name' for your turntable's Line-In, choose 'Airplay Device'. This changes the buffer depth to ~500ms, which may be enough to deal with temporary interruptions you were seeing with your turntable.
That text looks familiar :D
... Yes indeed pwt ?. The credit for this one certainly goes to you. I was aware of it from discussions some years back, but had forgotten about it until I saw your post recently... it’s obviously due to the ageing grey cells not working like they used to. Anyhow... THANK-YOU! ?
Userlevel 7
Badge +20
Yes indeed pwt ?. The credit for this one certainly goes to you. I was aware of it from discussions some years back, but had forgotten about it until I saw your post recently... it’s obviously due to the ageing grey cells not working like they used to. Anyhow... THANK-YOU! ?
It just made me chuckle.

I do wish Sonos had a better approach to this, and I particularly dislike this kind of undocumented behaviour. I see no reason why Sonos can't implement simple options per Line-In connection to permit adjustment of:
(1) Buffer depth ... from 25ms to 5s.
(2) Compression setting (including adding FLAC instead of WAV where hardware allows)
Yes indeed pwt ?. The credit for this one certainly goes to you. I was aware of it from discussions some years back, but had forgotten about it until I saw your post recently... it’s obviously due to the ageing grey cells not working like they used to. Anyhow... THANK-YOU! ?
It just made me chuckle.

I do wish Sonos had a better approach to this, and I particularly dislike this kind of undocumented behaviour. I see no reason why Sonos can't implement simple options per Line-In connection to permit adjustment of:
(1) Buffer depth ... from 25ms to 5s.
(2) Compression setting (including adding FLAC instead of WAV where hardware allows)
Yes, seems sensible on the face if it, perhaps it’s patent, or some kind of licensing issue, that prevents these suggestions? 'Appropriate' buffer size selections or maybe a list of useful presets, seems an obvious one to introduce, but I’m not an expert in these things.
And I’d guess there is a certain amount of reticence on Sonos’ part to increase complexity of their client. They seem to be pointed at the ‘ease of use’ market much more that the ‘I need individual knobs for every single option’ market.
And I’d guess there is a certain amount of reticence on Sonos’ part to increase complexity of their client. They seem to be pointed at the ‘ease of use’ market much more that the ‘I need individual knobs for every single option’ market.Yes, that’s true Bruce and people have mentioned that when it comes to the EQ Settings aswell, but surely a few presets in all these areas is not adding too much complexity to the user-interface whilst perhaps providing the more experienced users out there with some added benefit. Room Grouping is, by far, a more complex area (particularly when adding Alexa Groups into the mix), than perhaps providing these areas with a few useful additional options, I think.
(2) Compression setting (including adding FLAC instead of WAV where hardware allows)
On-the-fly FLAC compression would take far too much CPU/latency to be useful. It might also require an Ogg streaming container. If Sonos wanted to introduce a low-latency 'nearly CD' quality between WAV and the high latency SBC they could implement ADPCM. All a bit of a faff really, for a minority of customers.
Userlevel 7
Badge +20
(2) Compression setting (including adding FLAC instead of WAV where hardware allows)
On-the-fly FLAC compression would take far too much CPU/latency to be useful. It might also require an Ogg streaming container. If Sonos wanted to introduce a low-latency 'nearly CD' quality between WAV and the high latency SBC they could implement ADPCM. All a bit of a faff really, for a minority of customers.

I stream AirPlay streams to Sonos players in FLAC using AirConnect [1]. The ALAC decode and FLAC encode combined use about 5% of a single CPU core on a 4-core Raspberry Pi 3, per stream. Are recent Sonos CPUs really 80x slower?

I use a (configurable) latency of 500ms on the outgoing stream.

[1] https://github.com/philippe44/AirConnect
I stream AirPlay streams to Sonos players in FLAC using AirConnect [1]. The ALAC decode and FLAC encode combined use about 5% of a single CPU core on a 4-core Raspberry Pi 3, per stream. Are recent Sonos CPUs really 80x slower?
I would hope not, but in the old ZP80/100 I'd bet they'd be very sluggish by comparison.

Which FLAC compression setting are you using? If there's only a marginal, say 1/3, reduction in bandwidth from WAV, within the same 500ms latency available with Sonos 'AirPlay Device', it's debatable whether it would be worth the R&D investment on Line-In.
Userlevel 7
Badge +20
Which FLAC compression setting are you using? If there's only a marginal, say 1/3, reduction in bandwidth from WAV, within the same 500ms latency available with Sonos 'AirPlay Device', it's debatable whether it would be worth the R&D investment on Line-In.
I'd have to dig into the code to check, but (as you know) there's not much difference between the different FLAC encoding levels, which vary only from about 75% to 70% compression. I was really just questioning the assertion that this it's a CPU-heavy task incurring lots of latency, and I did caveat my statement with 'where hardware allows', acknowledging that the older hardware would probably not be up to the task.

This is minor though: my main complaint is with the overall implementation and presentation of the Line-In settings, which should be configurable on a per-source basis, with tunable buffering, and ideally a choice of compression options where the hardware allows. Hidden, undocumented behaviour like the AirPlay Device trick should really be avoided. Sonos can still use sensible defaults for people that do not need the options. I don't believe these changes would be hard to implement. Whether it's worth the investment? Only Sonos knows.
I'd have to dig into the code to check, but (as you know) there's not much difference between the different FLAC encoding levels, which vary only from about 75% to 70% compression.In terms of results, maybe, but it's the law of diminishing returns and a compression of 9 could eat a good bit more CPU than 0.

This is minor though: my main complaint is with the overall implementation and presentation of the Line-In settings, which should be configurable on a per-source basis, with tunable buffering, and ideally a choice of compression options where the hardware allows.There I'll agree with you.

Hidden, undocumented behaviour like the AirPlay Device trick should really be avoided. There's reference to the AirPlay setting here, but the article is somewhat confusing as it doesn't mention that it can also be used when Uncompressed.
Userlevel 7
Badge +20
In terms of results, maybe, but it's the law of diminishing returns and a compression of 9 could eat a good bit more CPU than 0.
Sure. There’d be little point in using the higher compression settings, especially for one-off signal distribution.

There's reference to the AirPlay setting here, but the article is somewhat confusing as it doesn't mention that it can also be used when Uncompressed.
Thanks. That’s a good support article; I don’t think I’ve seen it before.