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Connect amp


Hi, I have 3 connect amps wired to B&W speakers as a multidimensional system. These are installed in the it room and speakers cables wired to it physically. House has been fitted with accesspoints. For some reason I can only see the Sonos devices when I'm near the IT room and when my device is connected to any of the access points amps don't show up. All points have same ssid and password. Not sure what this would be the case?
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Best answer by Ken_Griffiths 7 May 2018, 10:14

dpac84,

If you have just one one connect:amp, or other Sonos device, cabled (ethernet) to a central router it goes into Boost Mode and uses the Sonos hidden WiFi network called SonosNet, that is built into every Sonos device. The WiFi signal will then 'hop' and 'span' out, like a spiders web, to all Sonos devices in an efficient manner.

So if you had (say) a very long corridor with three Sonos devices at the beginning, middle and end ...and a normal WiFi signal (located at the beginning) could not reach the end device, a SonosNet signal would simply 'hop' off the middle Sonos device, like a stepping stone, and so it would provide better range and stronger signal compared to many standard WiFi routers.

It’s also often ideal to use SonosNet when there are lots of WiFi repeaters/extenders around the house.

If you decide to switch to SonosNet there are two further things to do during/after setup...

1. In the Sonos App Advanced Settings, change the SonosNet WiFi channel so that it is unique and not used by any other device in your household.
2. Remove/Reset your WiFi credentials in the ‘Advanced Settings/Wireless Setup' area of the Sonos App.

Also Note... An Android Mobile Sonos Controller can be made to connect directly to the 'hidden' local SonosNet WiFi signal (authorised in the App) and therefore it will often connect to its nearest Sonos node, whereas other mobile controllers like an iOS device, always needs connection to the central router WiFi in this situation, to get access to the SonosNet network. (This is perhaps why your Sonos controller has been losing its connection as you move away from your I.T. Room)

In my own personal experience, SonosNet seems to work much better than 'Standard Mode', which is where no Sonos device at all is cabled to a local network router and simply runs on a central WiFi connection ... all devices must be able to reach the routers WiFi signal in this situation, as the signal will not bounce or 'hop' between the Sonos devices in this type of setup.
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4 replies

dpac84,

If you have just one one connect:amp, or other Sonos device, cabled (ethernet) to a central router it goes into Boost Mode and uses the Sonos hidden WiFi network called SonosNet, that is built into every Sonos device. The WiFi signal will then 'hop' and 'span' out, like a spiders web, to all Sonos devices in an efficient manner.

So if you had (say) a very long corridor with three Sonos devices at the beginning, middle and end ...and a normal WiFi signal (located at the beginning) could not reach the end device, a SonosNet signal would simply 'hop' off the middle Sonos device, like a stepping stone, and so it would provide better range and stronger signal compared to many standard WiFi routers.

It’s also often ideal to use SonosNet when there are lots of WiFi repeaters/extenders around the house.

If you decide to switch to SonosNet there are two further things to do during/after setup...

1. In the Sonos App Advanced Settings, change the SonosNet WiFi channel so that it is unique and not used by any other device in your household.
2. Remove/Reset your WiFi credentials in the ‘Advanced Settings/Wireless Setup' area of the Sonos App.

Also Note... An Android Mobile Sonos Controller can be made to connect directly to the 'hidden' local SonosNet WiFi signal (authorised in the App) and therefore it will often connect to its nearest Sonos node, whereas other mobile controllers like an iOS device, always needs connection to the central router WiFi in this situation, to get access to the SonosNet network. (This is perhaps why your Sonos controller has been losing its connection as you move away from your I.T. Room)

In my own personal experience, SonosNet seems to work much better than 'Standard Mode', which is where no Sonos device at all is cabled to a local network router and simply runs on a central WiFi connection ... all devices must be able to reach the routers WiFi signal in this situation, as the signal will not bounce or 'hop' between the Sonos devices in this type of setup.
Thanks guys, what's the difference between boost and standard mode? My AP aren't on the same channel...
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
Also make sure your APs are all on the same channel if you are using Standard Mode and not Boost Mode.
Userlevel 7
Badge +22
Your Access points must have a different subnet in their settings... check the subnet information of your primary router and the Access points. Also insure they are truly access points and getting their IP addresses from primary router.