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App update means my house is very quiet!

  • 3 March 2018
  • 9 replies
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The new app has completely stopped all devices being able to talk to Sonos as the rooms have become invisible. It is the weekend, I can’t go outside because of the snow and I can’t listen to a blessed thing. What is going on?
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Best answer by Jeff_66 3 March 2018, 13:08

We had tried that already . Just rebooted the router instead and that seems to have worked. What a pain though!
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9 replies

Probably an IP conflict. Reboot everything on the network so they get fresh, unique IP addresses.
We had tried that already . Just rebooted the router instead and that seems to have worked. What a pain though!
The issue is with the router. It perhaps rebooted earlier, and lost track of which IP addresses it had handed out. A common shortcoming of many home routers. When the Sonos units restarted following the update they could have been given IPs that were already in use.

Rebooting just the router (again) may simply perpetuate the situation, but see how you get on. If problems recur then follow my earlier post.

Two points:
- IP conflicts clear themselves automatically, but it can take up to a day
- IP conflicts can be avoided by reserving fixed IP addresses in the router config
Literally every time there's a system update I have to go through this extremely frustrating experience of the system not working and dropping out. It's so jarring. Even switching everything off and on again room by room doesn't fix it and then arbitrarily, things will start to be OK(ish) again. I swear it all got bad like this a year or so ago after one particular update and it hasn't been right since.

I find it so annoying. We've spent so much money on Sonos equipment and we're too invested to consider anything else but if I had my time again, I would steer well clear of this system. It's a shame because I love the sound and when it's working it's great but the last 12 months have been so troublesome.
Each time there's an update a few dozen people blame Sonos for this kind of thing, but it's a fundamental problem with cheap home routers that lose IP lease info across a reboot.

If an IP conflict occurs with, say, a phone or computer, all that happens is that the internet seems slow for a while. Because Sonos is a real-time streaming system dependent on timely traffic delivery, and with a lot of local communications, it's more susceptible.

As I said above, IP conflicts can be avoided by reserving fixed IP addresses in the router config. Consult your router documentation. Fix the IPs for Sonos players and anything used to control them. Sonos updates should thenceforth be trouble-free.
Each time there's an update a few dozen people blame Sonos for this kind of thing, but it's a fundamental problem with cheap home routers that lose IP lease info across a reboot.

If an IP conflict occurs with, say, a phone or computer, all that happens is that the internet seems slow for a while. Because Sonos is a real-time streaming system dependent on timely traffic delivery, and with a lot of local communications, it's more susceptible.

As I said above, IP conflicts can be avoided by reserving fixed IP addresses in the router config. Consult your router documentation. Fix the IPs for Sonos players and anything used to control them. Sonos updates should thenceforth be trouble-free.


Ratty, much as I appreciate your points - It shouldn't be necessary to have expertise with IP configuration on a home network in order to have a stable Sonos network. I have a BT router on which I have spent considerable time trying to figure out how to assign permanent IP addresses to my Sonos speakers and have had no luck. The computers in the house enable me to do this but it is through an interface on the computer OS, not on the router.

At the very least, the Sonos speakers ought to have the same capability to claim their own IP address from within the companion Sonos application. Such a feature might also allow Sonos as a company to exert more control over these kinds of issues since they make the hardware. Off-loading the process onto a myriad of routers from different manufacturers doesn't help.

This morning, I had 2 Play 5's 3 meters apart, one of which was connected via ethernet that just wouldn't stay synched as a stereo pair regardless of how many restarts I did. I wanted to throw them out out of the window.
It shouldn't be necessary to have expertise with IP configuration on a home network in order to have a stable Sonos network.
I agree, but home router manufacturers don't make it easy. They could check whether an IP address is in use before assigning it to a new/rebooted device, but most can't be bothered.

Sonos will obviously work in the absence of IP reservation, but if a router has been rebooted earlier and an IP conflict occurs when the units restart post-update one either has to restart the network or just wait a day (usually) for the conflict to clear itself.

I have a BT router on which I have spent considerable time trying to figure out how to assign permanent IP addresses to my Sonos speakers and have had no luck.

There's been an 'Always use this IP address' option somewhere in there since the earliest HomeHub if I recall. In actual fact, since HomeHub5 (maybe earlier) the router has a tendency to keep the same address for each device anyway. It's not a hard reservation, but it's fairly close.

The computers in the house enable me to do this but it is through an interface on the computer OS, not on the router.

That's static IP address assignment in the end station. Other than for certain devices, like the router itself, it's a deprecated practice since it can lead to accidental collisions and is a pain to manage. Sonos doesn't provide a static IP option, with good reason, and only relies on DHCP. With this the router -- specifically the DHCP server therein -- is the centralised 'boss' of the network. It's there that the reservation needs to be made (see above).

At the very least, the Sonos speakers ought to have the same capability to claim their own IP address from within the companion Sonos application. Such a feature might also allow Sonos as a company to exert more control over these kinds of issues since they make the hardware. Off-loading the process onto a myriad of routers from different manufacturers doesn't help.

Again, this is contrary to the way home networks work. See above re centralised DHCP. In any case the Sonos controller app is an optional component. There can be many or none on the network. And you couldn't have a Sonos app acting as a private DHCP server without active coordination between it and the router's server ... to avoid conflict (which was where we came in).

This morning, I had 2 Play 5's 3 meters apart, one of which was connected via ethernet that just wouldn't stay synched as a stereo pair regardless of how many restarts I did. I wanted to throw them out out of the window.

Maybe you have issues beyond the recurring post-update potential IP conflict, such as wireless interference. There could even be a hardware fault in one of the units. You should submit a system diagnostic within 10 mins of such an event, post the number and follow up with Sonos Support.
OK, lets do that pedantic thing of quoting each other's quote piece by piece.


I agree, but home router manufacturers don't make it easy. They could check whether an IP address is in use before assigning it to a new/rebooted device, but most can't be bothered.

Sonos will obviously work in the absence of IP reservation, but if a router has been rebooted earlier and an IP conflict occurs when the units restart post-update one either has to restart the network or just wait a day (usually) for the conflict to clear itself.


It's not helpful to suggest what router manufacturers "Could" do. The fact is that Sonos as you pointed out relies on a good connection and a reliable signal to maintain synchronisation. Therefore, in my view it is more the responsibility of Sonos to ensure there are mechanisms in place to facilitate that. Router manufacturers serve a broader customer base with different requirements.


There's been an 'Always use this IP address' option somewhere in there since the earliest HomeHub if I recall. In actual fact, since HomeHub5 (maybe earlier) the router has a tendency to keep the same address for each device anyway. It's not a hard reservation, but it's fairly close.


I've never found it. A link or some instructions on finding it would be much appreciated.


That's static IP address assignment in the end station. Other than for certain devices, like the router itself, it's a deprecated practice since it can lead to accidental collisions and is a pain to manage. Sonos doesn't provide a static IP option, with good reason, and only relies on DHCP. With this the router -- specifically the DHCP server therein -- is the centralised 'boss' of the network. It's there that the reservation needs to be made (see above).


I've not had any issues with any of the computers which reserve their own IP addresses and the system works fine on my network.

Again, this is contrary to the way home networks work. See above re centralised DHCP. In any case the Sonos controller app is an optional component. There can be many or none on the network. And you couldn't have a Sonos app acting as a private DHCP server without active coordination between it and the router's server ... to avoid conflict (which was where we came in).


I meant that the Sonos app should have a feature whereby you can make each speaker reserve its own IP address. The number of Sonos applications on the network is irrelevant, since the feature would reside on each speaker and merely be accessible and configured by the Sonos app being used at the time rather like the other config options such as room settings or EQ levels.


Maybe you have issues beyond the recurring post-update potential IP conflict, such as wireless interference. There could even be a hardware fault in one of the units. You should submit a system diagnostic within 10 mins of such an event, post the number and follow up with Sonos Support.


It's unlikely to be a hardware fault when it only happens after an update. Furthermore they are new speakers. I have returned 2 faulty speakers to Sonos already and I'm familiar with the process. Annoying as this current issue is, I can't fault the customer service from Sonos.
OK, lets do that pedantic thing of quoting each other's quote piece by piece.
It was to aid understanding. I won't then, except for:
It's not helpful to suggest what router manufacturers "Could" do. The fact is that Sonos as you pointed out relies on a good connection and a reliable signal to maintain synchronisation. Therefore, in my view it is more the responsibility of Sonos to ensure there are mechanisms in place to facilitate that. Router manufacturers serve a broader customer base with different requirements.

It's the router (DHCP server) that's in charge of the network. A Sonos device could potentially try and determine whether an IP is already in use, refuse it, and endeavour to request another that it thinks is vacant. A router's cooperation with this IP request is not guaranteed however, so it could be ignored.

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Despite the odd insistent plea over the years, Sonos won't implement static IP configuration. It's contrary to the whole ethos of 'zero configuration networking' of which UPnP is a part. In the wrong hands, the use of static addressing would lead to an explosion of support calls. Remember the days when your office network relied on static IPs and the IT guys were always been called in to assist?

As for reserving addresses in the BT Hub, which model is it?