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VPN to rectify poor Sonos performance?

  • 3 November 2021
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I now know that 20+ speakers is not ideal for one system in our 5,000 sf house.

A technician advises us that we could benefit from setting up a VPN.

Could this be a solution to our ongoing problems of lack of connectivity and control of multiple speakers?

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Best answer by Ken_Griffiths 3 November 2021, 20:15

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I would be amazed if a VPN on it’s own would sort out network connectivity issues, as normally the problem resides locally.

Can you please detail the problem that you are experiencing?

I assume you are running in SonosNet mode, i.e. you have at least one Sonos device wired to your router?

And I trust that if you do, it isn't a Bridge?

Find another technician, one who understands the difference between local networking and external connections. 

20 devices is by no means excessive. However the physical distribution could be straining wireless communications. 

I agree with @ratty - perhaps find another technician.

VPN doesn’t make much sense to me - could it be vLAN rather than VPN, perhaps? 

Anyhow, 20 devices is not all that excessive - one Sonos Household can handle more than half that amount again and some networks may have more than one Household. 

Running devices in SonosNet mode (meaning simply having one Sonos product wired to the main router) is quite often the way to go with such a system and then leave your non-Sonos network products either wired to the LAN, or connected to non-overlapping WiFi signals and spread them across the WiFi bands available. 

A little thought about the Sonos system device locations and some network channel configuration is probably all that is required, I personally suspect.

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Just to lay it out in the most basic terms, a VPN is carried on your existing connection.

A VPN has additional overhead to process traffic onto the VPN, even more if it is encrypted.

Any glitch in your existing networking connection will be magnified on the VPN link.

 

I moved my setup to SonosNet mode by wiring all the easy to wire Sonos main speakers (not Sub and Surround) and removing the WiFi credentials from my controller. -- Not sure how that works with Move or Roam devices. -- That really cut back on my WiFi 2.4 GHz channel utilization lowering the congestion so Sonos can more easily move the music data.

When grouping speakers I always try to start with one of the wired ones, that also seems to reduce the WiFi traffic load.

Just for a bit more stability at power flops and update time I added static/reserved IP addresses for all my Sonos devices on my router’s DHCP page. Some folks have no issues with this, for others this makes a big difference.

Userlevel 1
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Just to lay it out in the most basic terms, a VPN is carried on your existing connection.

A VPN has additional overhead to process traffic onto the VPN, even more if it is encrypted.

Any glitch in your existing networking connection will be magnified on the VPN link.

 

I moved my setup to SonosNet mode by wiring all the easy to wire Sonos main speakers (not Sub and Surround) and removing the WiFi credentials from my controller. -- Not sure how that works with Move or Roam devices. -- That really cut back on my WiFi 2.4 GHz channel utilization lowering the congestion so Sonos can more easily move the music data.

When grouping speakers I always try to start with one of the wired ones, that also seems to reduce the WiFi traffic load.

Just for a bit more stability at power flops and update time I added static/reserved IP addresses for all my Sonos devices on my router’s DHCP page. Some folks have no issues with this, for others this makes a big difference.

Thanks to all answers indicating that VPN is not a solution. That fix was to occur in two weeks, so I am safe from that.

My symptoms are difficulty in forming an assembly of speakers to play simultaneously.

On our three floor house, I have Boosts connected to Ethernet ports on two floors, and to the router on the main level.

i don’t have any Booms or Roams.

I am intrigued by the two fixes mentioned here: 1. Remove IP addresses; and 2. Adding static IP addresses on the router’s DHCP page. 
 

For solution #1: Fortunately, I do know how to find all devices’ IP addresses. Would I remove all but the three Boosts’ addresses? And most importantly, how is the removal performed?

 

For solution #2: Adding static IP addresses. I am completely unsure how to perform this, and if I learn how to do it, which are the “static” addresses that I should add? Would it be only the three connected products (the Boosts)?

For further information: We have Comcast Infinity. Just moved in from a house that used Verizon.

Sonos devices now are: Boosts (three that are wired) and two extras that are unplugged and unused, Arcs, multiple new generation 5’s and new generation 1’s, multiple Beams and Playbars, a Playbase, five new amps, two big woofers.

 

 

 

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Please see my post here to explain about duplicate IP addresses: Tips & Tricks - Resolving random issues impacting Sonos devices.. | Sonos Community

At the end of the article is a recommendation on the range of IP addresses to use.  If you’re stuck, please let us know the make and model of your router.

On our three floor house, I have Boosts connected to Ethernet ports on two floors, and to the router on the main level.

How are the first two Boosts connected back to the router? If a CAT5e/6/7 cable has been pulled, all well and good. If it’s via a powerline connection or the Ethernet ports on mesh WiFi satellites it would be asking for trouble.

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If ratty’s point isn’t an issue, then once you have added the static/reserved IP addresses. Power down ALL Sonos devices, reboot the router and controllers and then power the Sonos back up, start with your wired to Ethernet devices.

Check the Status page in the controller to make sure all the main speakers are in wired, WM:0 mode and remove your WiFi credentials from the controller’s WiFi settings page.

If you are still having issues submit a diagnostic when (within 15 minutes) you have an issue, then contact Sonos with the ID number to get them to look at your internal data we users can’t see.