Unique/Complex Setup question

  • 18 February 2021
  • 10 replies
  • 47 views

The question is how best to setup effectively the Sonos:playbase, amp, and port.  The setting: a Motorola amp, Sony CD player, Sony DVD player, dual casette tape player, Panasonic TV, and independent turntable.  I also have the playbase with four Sonos speakers currently in surround sound with the Panasonic. Finally, with a small LG TV I have a two Sonos speakers, and a beam set up in stereo.   There are 4 additional speakers, three of the one variety and 1 sonos3. I am attempting to put the best subsystems together regardless of what entertainment unit I use.  So, what would be your suggestions, please. Feel unconstrained on all the Sonos system as I am trying to get to the most effective sub-systems. 


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Hey @fremkiewicz, welcome to the community.

 

From what I understand of your post you’re looking to get the best home theater setups for each of your TVs, plus a way to link your CD, DVD etc players to the Sonos system. Here’s my suggestion:

 

Panasonic TV
Playbase + 2x Sonos Ones or Sonos Amp for surround sound (it’s not clear what your Amp is being used for currently)

 

LG TV

Beam + 2x Sonos Ones for surround sound

 

I would suggest connecting the rest of your equipment (CD Player, Casette player and turntable) up to the Port through line-in, though you’d need to switch the cables over or use multiple Ports since a Port can only take one line-in connection at a time. I’m assuming the DVD player is connected to a TV already, so it could use whichever surround system is connected to that TV.

The other Ones and Play:3 can be placed wherever you like, in other rooms to get that whole home listening experience :grinning:

 

I hope that helps, or if you have any other questions we’re here to assist :smile:

 
 
 
 
 

The question is how best to setup effectively the Sonos:playbase, amp, and port.  The setting: a Motorola amp, Sony CD player, Sony DVD player, dual casette tape player, Panasonic TV, and independent turntable.  I also have the playbase with four Sonos speakers currently in surround sound with the Panasonic. Finally, with a small LG TV I have a two Sonos speakers, and a beam set up in stereo.   There are 4 additional speakers, three of the one variety and 1 sonos3. I am attempting to put the best subsystems together regardless of what entertainment unit I use.  So, what would be your suggestions, please. Feel unconstrained on all the Sonos system as I am trying to get to the most effective sub-systems. 

 

It’s not really possible to give good advice on how best to use the audio equipment in your home without knowing more about your home and what your personal requirements are for audio in your home.  Can you describe the rooms you have in your home, and what equipment is currently there, and what the primary use of the room is...TV audio or music.

 

From what I gather, this is all the Sonos equipment you have:

Playbase

Amp (is this a Sonos Amp or Connect:Amp?)

Port

2nd playbase?

4 unknown Sonos speakers (you said they are in surround sound, but 4 surround speakers is not possible with Sonos speakers)

2 unknown Sonos speakers

Beam

3 Sonos Ones (or are they play:1s?)

1 Sonos 3.

 

Non-Sonos equipment.

motorola amp, CD player, DVD player, dual cassette player, turntable, panasonic tv, LG TV.

 

I would assume you also have some passive/non-powered speakers since you have a Sonos branded amp and motorola amp?

 

 

In answer to the questions posed:

1, the Sonos amp (not connect:amp) is a recent purchase to more effectively group the systems.

2, I failed to mention I have the latest Sonos boost.

3, my home is single story, 2,000+ square feet, 4 Br, 2 bath, a semi-open floor layout.  The current physical placement is as follows:

family/tv room: playbase, amp, port, music equipment, 3 Sonos speakers, dvd (kitchen is open to family room)

our bedroom: beam, 2 Sonos speakers

kids room: 1 Sonos speaker

library: 1 Sonos speaker (library is open to dining room)

office: 2 Sonos speakers

Garage/work room: 1 Sonos speaker (garage, bedrooms, not open to adjacent rooms)

to clarify the seemingly randomness of it all, I purchased the music system when I had passive/wired speakers and all those speakers failed at one time or another prompting me to look to Sonos wireless.  The conversion to Sonos started about 12-15 years ago.  The acquisitions were based on finance and available Sonos equipment.  As speakers changed and I acquired new ones, I placed the older speakers around the house and speakers are all Sonos 1/ones of various ages except for the 3. (I am unclear as to why each is different from the strictly speaker perspective)

The need/desire to consolidate originally stems from the “digital clutter” in my house.  To round out the “other unrelated equipment:  ATT GATEWAY, Nighthawk router with Netgear extender, Alexa show 8, spot, 3 echo ports; lights, oven, furnace/ac on ecobee system; a variety of smartphones, 4 laptops, 1 desktop, 3 chrome books.  At one point I had over 71 different devices connected to the Wifi.  The major use has been 2 grandchildren on distance learning in school, daughter/teacher Google 2 certified with several on-line groups she maintains.  The Sonos system is setup with Alexa support so the Alexa system and the Sonos system exist in a symbiotic relationship.  Alexa system drives home automation (lights, oven, etc.) in general everything affects everything else creating the complexities.

I hope this clarifies/helps.

thank you both for your suggestions.

In answer to the questions posed:

1, the Sonos amp (not connect:amp) is a recent purchase to more effectively group the systems.

 

The Sonos amp doesn’t help group systems.  Not sure what you are getting at here.  The Sonos amp is used to setup a Sonos room powering third party passive (no built in amp) speakers, such at typical bookshelf speakers, or ceiling speakers.  Since you didn’t mentioning having anything like this, I don’t see how the Sonos amp is useful to you.

 

2, I failed to mention I have the latest Sonos boost.

3, my home is single story, 2,000+ square feet, 4 Br, 2 bath, a semi-open floor layout.  The current physical placement is as follows:

family/tv room: playbase, amp, port, music equipment, 3 Sonos speakers, dvd (kitchen is open to family room)

 

I would setup the playbase and two of the 3 Sonos speakers (Sonos Ones) as surroud speakers...if not setup that way already.  The last Sonos speaker (play:3) could be an additional speaker in the kitchen. Your DVD player would connect to the TV.   

 

You had mentioned a tape deck and CD player.  You could those into the system through the Port if you wish.  Otherwise the Port doesn’t really have any value based on what you’ve described.

Not sure what other sort of information or advice you’re looking for.

 

Could I use the port in conjunction with my beam, 2 Sonos speakers, TV? Would that be a good alternative?

What do you mean by ‘in conjunction’? 

Yes, all Sonos devices are designed to connect to each other. 

All Sonos devices with an analog input have only one, so if you wanted to connect multiple devices to that single input, you’d need some sort of external switch. 

Bruce,

just realized I got confused.  I like the way you have he port/cd/etc called out.  In the bedroom I currently have another TV connected to a beam.  Can I interface the beam/amp via optical cable OR interface the TV with the amp via optical cable and improve the sound to the two Sonos speakers that are in that room and being driven by the beam/stereo speakers?

 

I appreciate your time and expertise. Thank you.

Frank

You can have a single Sonos device connected as the ‘home theater’ device. It interprets the Dolby Digital signal, and then sends the necessary surround speaker information to the pair of Sonos speakers on a ‘hidden’ 5Ghz channel. So, no, adding a second wired device to your TV would not change the quality of the surround speakers. Most TVs have a single digital output turned on at a time, although some TVs do have both the optical output and an ARC signal concurrently, but I wouldn’t be willing to place any bets there. It certainly isn’t the way the TV or Sonos is designed to be used.

However, it’s possible that you haven’t set up that pair of speakers as surrounds, and you have the two Sonos ‘rooms’ as grouped, with the second room doubling the sound from the Beam. Which would be about 75ms behind the sound of the Beam.

Can you provide more information about how you have the system set up?

Bruce,

I think I did about what you suggested.  In the bedroom I have a beam, 2 Sonos speakers, the amp, and to my surprise, a Sony dvd/cd player.  In fairness to me this DVD player was hidden underneath the cable box.  The beam, the tv, and the two speakers in stereo are one set.  Then I have the cd/dvd player connecting to the tv and the cd/dvd player sound (RCA cables) to the amp placing the two stereo speakers in the same room.  
 

Sound close?

 

Frank

So, when you open the controller and go to Settings> System, does it say ‘name of Beam’s room’ +LS +RS ?

You’ve dropped any discussion about a Sonos Port, and have added an amp. Is this a Sonos Amp?

I’m still trying to understand what Sonos devices you have. I get that you have a TV connected to the Beam, that’s great. And you have another pair if Sonos speakers, either bonded as surrounds to the Beam, or just grouped with the Beam.

Is the DVD/ CD player connected to the TV via HDMI? Are these stereo speakers you’re speaking about connected to the Sonos Amp, which is the device you have the sound output fronthe DVD/CD player connected to?

If this ‘amp’ you’re speaking of is a Sonos Amp, then yes, you can group all your Sonos ‘rooms’ together, and get the music from the CD player on all speakers, including the Beam. If that is the case, you may want to go in to the room settings for the Beam, and set the surround speakers to ‘Full’, so that they’re playing the whole stereo signal, and not just supporting the Beam. 

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