No SMB2 or SMB3 support ???

  • 17 August 2018
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  • Anonymous
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Could it be, that Sonos still has only SMB1 clients on their speakers ? That would be a security whole as somebody could hack through SMB1 connections ... I can't believe that ....

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25 replies

Yes, it's true. There's quite a few very lengthy threads about that, with lots of discussion and information about the potential reasons why. You could probably do a google search and find them, as the board's search function is variable.
Yeah, I just was wondering that Sonos now with Version 9 of th eFirmware still not has fixed that . I can't believe that using a SMB2 client is such a difficulty. But they have concentrated on collecting more data instead of fixing the holes of their system 😃
It is fixed for PC based shares. They now use HTTP for local file sharing and do not need the disk to be SMB v1.

https://en.community.sonos.com/announcements-228985/sonos-8-6-app-improvements-and-new-windows-library-sharing-6808278
If you would read the various threads that already exist, I think you would find explanations as to why Sonos still has SMBv1.
Ok, it is not really fixed: there is a workaround available per http, but SMBv1 is still on the speakers. This is contradicting Sonos statement, they are secure. I would rather see an open statement, then always the marketing slogan "You are save , we will protect you" ....
I think you've made your concerns clear in both threads.
Ok, it is not really fixed: there is a workaround available per http, but SMBv1 is still on the speakers. This is contradicting Sonos statement, they are secure. I would rather see an open statement, then always the marketing slogan "You are save , we will protect you" ....

No, SMB is not "still on the speakers". This thread is about SMB being used for the music library, which is most certainly not "on the speakers".

Sheesh, could someone be more wrong about more things in one day than this guy?
Whether it is the speaker or the control app that opens the SMBv1 - it is a security risk ! Either the speaker connects direkt to the library - which would be a clear and traffic reduced way or the Sonos controller connects through SMBv1 to the Server and then streams it via http down to the Speakers - which would double the traffic and would be a "solution" of the network - just because the speakers don't support SMBv2/3
Now Mr propeller
Sheesh, could someone be more wrong about more things in one day than this guy?
How is it technical done ?
I believe that Sonos is responsible for the application, the product that they deliver.
It is unbelievable that they still do not support a secure connection.
We may be able to investigate whether we can start a lawsuit, to put a little more pressure on them, to update their application, product.
I now only have the choice to remove my music library from my Sonos or to enable an unsafe protocol on my NAS. negative publication usually helps the best to get something done.
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If they are the only choices you can think of or find here...
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There are numerous other ways to get a personal music library available through Sonos. This has come up in every discussion here about Sonos being unable to upgrade to SMBv2/3.

- Windows Media Player (Windows) has a media server option that Sonos can access
- MediaMonkey (Windows) has a UPnP server that Sonos can access
- Plex Media Server (Win, Mac, Linux, NAS) can be activated as a music service, allowing you to access your music library
- Subsonic (Win, Mac, Linux, some NAS) can add itself to Sonos as a music service
- Western Digital has a "music service" in Sonos that allows you to access music stored on WD MyCloud NAS devices

And I'm sure there are others. Any standard UPnP media server (not DLNA) will work, as long as the Sonos setting to show UPnP media servers is enabled.

And some folks have limited their exposure by setting up a Raspberry Pi (or some other micro-computer) with SMB and only their music library, then enable a firewall allowing only Sonos IP addresses to access it (setting the firewall is made easier if you set up DHCP reservations for your Sonos devices in one block that happens to be within a small network address boundary, like a /28).
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Except my DROBO NAS where I have 35,000 tracks ONLY SUPPORTS SMB2. Sonos please fix this!!!
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Sonos is not likely to fix this, so many posts and much discussion in the past and no action. Instead of waiting forever pick a solution that works with Sonos or live without your music files.
Still no fix?

Looks like I'm ditching Sonos 😞
Nope, still no fix. And has been explained over and over, unlikely to be one.

Where will you be ditching your Sonos?
I've already got a Roon Nucleus+ in place which also controls my Sonos hardware and allows me to bypass the outdated Sonos software. I'll prolly stick with a few Sonos hardware bits until I replace everything. Possibly NAIM, B&W or few others I've heard of.

It's really a shame. I've been with Sonos since the very early days. My NAS doesn't play well with SMB1 which doesn't leave me much choice. Nothing else on my home network requires SMB1 which made the decision to ditch Sonos pretty easy.

It'll get harder for Sonos when so many other brands are getting into this space.
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I've already got a Roon Nucleus+ in place which also controls my Sonos and allows me to bypass the outdated Sonos software. I'll prolly stick with a few Sonos hardware bits until I replace everything. Possibly NAIM, B&W or few others I've heard of.
It's really a shame. I've been with Sonos since the very early days. My NAS doesn't play well with SMB1 which doesn't leave me much choice. Nothing else on my home network requires SMB1 which made the decision to ditch Sonos pretty easy.
It'll get harder for Sonos when so many other brands are getting into this space.

It would seem simpler to change your NAS, but that would of course preclude all the posturing above.

Very few people complaining about the SMB v1 limitation understand anything about the actual security risk associated with running a non-Windows SMB v1 endpoint. It’s essentially negligible in a typical home environment. It wouldn’t make the top ten network security risks in most homes.
Well, unfortunately my system isn't typical. Switching out a NAS with 60TB+ isn't a simple or cheap task. Removing Sonos from the system is by far the cheapest and easiest.

And like I stated, all other hardware/software on my network supports modern versions of SMB. And to be frank, Sonos was my wife's "go to" for music while I used Roon. Suppose it won't be a huge hardship to bring her up to speed on ins and outs of Roon.

You're prolly correct in regards to most users understanding of SMB or most network protocols - even mine is somewhat limited. But when the only device on my network isn't playing nice with everything else - the decision is easy.
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So why not get a Raspberry Pi kit for under $50 and configure an SMB v1 gateway to your NAS? Takes about a half hour if you have to follow a tutorial.
Another option is just putting your music on a Pi or other cheap NAS and rsyncing it with your main NAS to keep it up to date, costs a few bucks more for the Pi's needed storage and has no real benefit over the SMB gateway option.
My days of tinkering and messing with home built PCs are long gone. I used to love finding clever ways to get stuff to work - I'm at the stage in my life where I'd rather just plug something in and have it work. 20 years ago, I'd be all over it!
So why not get a Raspberry Pi kit for under $50 and configure an SMB v1 gateway to your NAS? Takes about a half hour if you have to follow a tutorial.
Another option is just putting your music on a Pi or other cheap NAS and rsyncing it with your main NAS to keep it up to date, costs a few bucks more for the Pi's needed storage and has no real benefit over the SMB gateway option.


Solid advice as usual, but doesn't this break the entire concept of NOT having to tinker, fiddle, configure and troubleshoot your way to a fully functioning system?

After all Sonos is (or at least has been?) all about simplicity.
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After all Sonos is (or at least has been?) all about simplicity.

Indeed. If your music files are on a PC or a Mac it remains dead simple, but if you have a NAS then things are not simple.
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If I worked at Sonos I'd be selling a SMB v1 gateway for folks that had a NAS and didn't want to enable SMB v1 on it. I'd never make any money on it but it would put an end to the fussing and maybe make a few more sales. Offer SMB v3, NFS 3 or 4 and whatever Apple likes as NAS connections.

Probably a Pi 3A in a case with just Ethernet and power exposed, running on a read-only SD card so it was zero maintenance and tolerant of power issues. Put up a webserver and a single page to select the NAS to connect to and ne done with the issue.

Ubiquity made a lot of people happy with their Cloud Key WiFi device manager even though the software will run on a Pi or any PC.