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CD ripping storage device that I can hook up to my Play:5

  • 16 February 2016
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Looking for a good solution to rip my CD collection that has been cluttering up my home for years. Do not want to use my laptop. Just want it hooked it up to my network where I can access it on my home network. High quality format (lossless) if possible. Must be quiet. Any suggestions on where I should start?
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Best answer by agillis 18 February 2016, 22:38

Some of the biggest advantages of the microJukebox is it's small fanless design, fast processor, and TEAC ripping drive. Small and fanless for people who don't want a large noisy NAS, a fast processor for people who are tired of bad file transfer performance with cheap NAS drives, and the best in the industry TEAC ripping drive for people who what to rip their CDs quickly and accurately.

Also the microJukebox will autoconfigure itself with Sonos. I know most people will eventually figure out how to enter a cryptic network URL into the Sonos thick client but the microJukebox will just "show up" under the music library.

The microJukebox also has Squeezebox server and a DLNA server so you can access your music from other network music devices like a DLNA home theater receiver or appleTV. Plus other built in app like Plex Media Server let you play music to devices such as Roku.

microJukebox can also transcode your entire music collection from FLAC to mp3. This is good for portable music players, iPod, and car audio players.

So far from a "one trick pony" the microJukebox is more like the Swiss army knife of audio.

To answer Mullig70's question Small Green Computer, the makers of the microJukebox, offer great tech support via email or phone.
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A really good option for this would be a microJukebox. It will automatically rip any CD you put into it to lossless FLAC format including tagging and cover art.. The microJukebox will auto configure itself to show up in the music library on your Sonos. You can also copy any music files you have over to it. It's very small and quiet. If you get the SSD option it's completely noiseless.
A really good option for this would be a microJukebox. .

agree. this is the newest product from the Vortexbox folks. I'm a big fan of the Vortexbox as a ripper/server for music. I have ~100,000 tracks on my vortexbox server (and have 3, one home, one backup, and one at the weekend cottage). Small Green Computers (the US place I bought my vortexbox appliances) has always been a pleasure to deal with. And in one case where I had a problem, they handled it immediately with no charge.

edit: the Vortexbox server feeds either my Squeezeboxes or my Sonos.
I don't know the microjukebox. It looks a really good solution, and for convenience may be worth the hefty price tag for you.

But you can get to a similar place without a lot more effort and at much lower cost. Rip the CDs using your laptop (use an external drive if necessary). DBPowerAmo ripping software and the associated PerfectTunes software for keeping things tidy cost just a few dollars. Spend $100-$200 on a basic but perfectly good NAS. I and countless others have done this for our Sonos systems and it works perfectly..
I'm with John. I'm not a fan of those specialty items because they are limited in scope. I rip using Windows Media Player to my PC, fix up the tags with MP3Tag, then move the files to my WD MyBookLiveDuo and let Sonos access the files there. I have a second MBL that I mirror the first onto using MirrorFolder, and also have a 2 TB WD MyBook that I also mirror the original onto. It is very quiet, and because it plugs right into the network, I can store it anywhere.
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I'm with BCM and John. Every computer with a CD/DVD drive can rip your CDs.

Whilst these bespoke boxes work well I'm sure they are a 1 trick pony. Once you've ripped your CDs and packed away that clutter you now have the clutter of your new Juke box - essentially useless now you have no CDs to rip.

Do it on your laptop. If you worry the laptop drive is not up to it buy an external CD drive for the job
I'm with John. I'm not a fan of those specialty items because they are limited in scope. I rip using Windows Media Player to my PC, fix up the tags with MP3Tag, then move the files to my WD MyBookLiveDuo and let Sonos access the files there. I have a second MBL that I mirror the first onto using MirrorFolder, and also have a 2 TB WD MyBook that I also mirror the original onto. It is very quiet, and because it plugs right into the network, I can store it anywhere.

That seems like a long winded way of doing things, doesn't Windows media player allow you to sort the tags out before you rip? I use dbPoweramp, it imports the tags before the rip and you can edit them upfront so they're right from the beginning. Also why don't you just rip straight to the NAS rather than copying the files over afterwards? Your three steps process should easily be a single step.

Other than that though, yes, a simple NAS is all that's required.
WMP does bring in the tags, as well as dbPA, but sometimes they're a mess with misspellings and occasionally there are no proper tags. The track numbers are usually 1/12 or 1, I like to zero pad them, especially in the case of larger collections where track 100 appears just after 1, before 2.. For the few seconds it takes to right click the newly created folder and open it in MP3Tag and mass adjusting the tags (which WMP doesn't allow) before moving it, it really is no big deal.

It's faster to rip to the hard drive than across the network directly to the NAS, and it is a bit time consuming to have to select an output folder each time in WMP. Cutting and pasting the output folder to the NAS is actually quicker for me.

It can be a one step process, but this is the way that works for me.
Even though I use Vortexbox (which is just a linux OS with other things already added in to make it a good music/video server), I don't use the built in CD ripping function. All my CDs are ripped with dbpoweramp on my windows machine. And then after insuring art, tags, etc are exactly as I want them, moved over my network to my Vortexbox Appliance (i.e. NAS).

p.s. one doesn't have to buy a vortexbox. It is software and one can turn almost any old PC into a Vortexbox. See:
http://vortexbox.org/downloads
http://wiki.vortexbox.org/installation_guide
Thanks all for the replies. Much appreciated. So it sounds like I have two choices. 1) Spend some time and energy rippng my CDs to my laptop and then transferring the data to a storage device I can hook to my router / old computer running Vortexbox software. 2) Spend a higher amount to get a plug and play device. I still need to rip the CDs but the MicroJukebox will quickly attach to my network. Follow up: If i need support for option #1 (ex: storage device not recognized, files not transferring, etc...) where do I go? If I go with option #2, what type of support can I expect from the MicroJukebox people?
Option 1 there a plenty here that can assist if provided specifics. I can't help with the other option. Option 1 is really the easiest in my opinion. You're going to have to manage your tags on the ripped files anyway, so it really isn't all that extra a step.
@mullig Vortexbox makes a great NAS OS with ripping CD and DVD/Blurays a bonus.

Just to reiterate it is totally free assuming you have spare hardware, an old laptop will work. It rips unattended, insert CD, done. I also use Bliss tagger ($$) - it runs on Vortexbox and automatically adjusts tags, organization and art work based on rules I tell it. So makes a complete automated system.

Also check out Songkong, another automated tagger organizer.
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Some of the biggest advantages of the microJukebox is it's small fanless design, fast processor, and TEAC ripping drive. Small and fanless for people who don't want a large noisy NAS, a fast processor for people who are tired of bad file transfer performance with cheap NAS drives, and the best in the industry TEAC ripping drive for people who what to rip their CDs quickly and accurately.

Also the microJukebox will autoconfigure itself with Sonos. I know most people will eventually figure out how to enter a cryptic network URL into the Sonos thick client but the microJukebox will just "show up" under the music library.

The microJukebox also has Squeezebox server and a DLNA server so you can access your music from other network music devices like a DLNA home theater receiver or appleTV. Plus other built in app like Plex Media Server let you play music to devices such as Roku.

microJukebox can also transcode your entire music collection from FLAC to mp3. This is good for portable music players, iPod, and car audio players.

So far from a "one trick pony" the microJukebox is more like the Swiss army knife of audio.

To answer Mullig70's question Small Green Computer, the makers of the microJukebox, offer great tech support via email or phone.
agillis,

Isn't this about the time you should be telling folks you have a significant financial relationship with Vortexbox products? Like perhaps, you are the owner/developer?
agillis,

Isn't this about the time you should be telling folks you have a significant financial relationship with Vortexbox products? Like perhaps, you are the owner/developer?


True, and a fair point. but keep in mind that Vortexbox is a FREE product, that is, in my opinion, a fantastic piece of software, and over the many years I've been using a Vortexbox server, I've seen numerous major improvements--at no cost to me. I know many, many vortexbox users who haven't contributed a penny to any company owned by agillis.

agillis and others that contribute to the vortexbox software project have done the digital streaming world a remarkable service. (and I have no financial ties to Vortexbox or related companies...just a very satisfied user.)


True, and a fair point. but keep in mind that Vortexbox is a FREE product, that is, in my opinion, a fantastic piece of software, and over the many years I've been using a Vortexbox server, I've seen numerous major improvements--at no cost to me. I know many, many vortexbox users who haven't contributed a penny to any company owned by agillis.

agillis and others that contribute to the vortexbox software project have done the digital streaming world a remarkable service. (and I have no financial ties to Vortexbox or related companies...just a very satisfied user.)


We've been over this before. The software is free, but agillis sells his devices for profit, and he never shills just the software in here, it's always the hardware. His .org website is also riddled with links to buy his stuff. If you are going to shill your hardware, you should at least be honest enough to admit what you are doing. Spam is bad enough without wrapping it in a supposed piece of friendly advice from a fellow user or disguising it with a .org website riddled with ads for your commercial products. Be honest is all we ever asked, and agillis crossed the line into dishonesty and spamming many times. I only ask it not be repeated here.


True, and a fair point. but keep in mind that Vortexbox is a FREE product, that is, in my opinion, a fantastic piece of software, and over the many years I've been using a Vortexbox server, I've seen numerous major improvements--at no cost to me. I know many, many vortexbox users who haven't contributed a penny to any company owned by agillis.

agillis and others that contribute to the vortexbox software project have done the digital streaming world a remarkable service. (and I have no financial ties to Vortexbox or related companies...just a very satisfied user.)


We've been over this before. The software is free, but agillis sells his devices for profit, and he never shills just the software in here, it's always the hardware. His .org website is also riddled with links to buy his stuff. If you are going to shill your hardware, you should at least be honest enough to admit what you are doing. Spam is bad enough without wrapping it in a supposed piece of friendly advice from a fellow user or disguising it with a .org website riddled with ads for your commercial products. Be honest is all we ever asked, and agillis crossed the line into dishonesty and spamming many times. I only ask it not be repeated here.


The idea that TEAC drives are somehow vastly superior at reading cds than any other drive is dubious at best as well.
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I agree with jgatie. I was unaware that agillis was the owner/developer of Vortexbox. He definitely should have made that clear. It would be trivial to make a signature with that information.

Frankly I am not impressed
There is a difference between CD drives. I have an old W95 machine that will read CD's that cause real CD players to struggle. It's a slow, last resort ripper.

I'm not fond of using laptops as rippers because they are a little slower and don't tolerate damage very well, but if the CD's are in good condition I'll throw it in the mix of computers.

When I'm in ripping mode I lash up as many computers as possible, even laptops, and build a network of rippers. I quickly learn which type of defects each computer can tolerate and stack the CD's by the target machine after a brief visual inspection. I'll briefly check the tags before starting each rip. If the tags are imperfect, (all I care about at this point is that I can identify the CD later) I'll still rip the disc without messing with the tags, but I'll toss the CD on an "Edit" pile for later processing. I have the trays set to open when the rip is complete. As trays open, I feed the machine from its stack. As time allows, I'll work through the Edit pile, scanning artwork as necessary. Unless I'm stuck typing all of a CD's tags and scanning a lot of artwork, I can burn through 20-30 CD's an hour.

If I'm ripping just a few CD's, I'll just stack them by the computer and feed the tray while I'm multi-tasking other work. I can only rip a few CD's per hour in this mode, but this scheme does not have much impact on my other work.

After all of the ripping is done, I'll comb through the tags and correct any spelling errors. If you sort the tags, spelling errors are rather obvious.

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I'm not fond of ripping appliances because they are limited function products that have low utility after the ripping process is complete. Plus, I can only rip one CD at a time when using the appliance.
I am a recent purchaser of the Micro Jukebox. While I understand there are cheeper ways to rip CDs any play via Sonos, the product is a good and simple solution for someone like myself that is non-tech savvy. It works well, is easy to use, and Andrew's support is superb. I recommend
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This should work for CDs as well:

http://www.britishideas.com/2013/09/03/jack-the-ripper-bot-i-introduction

Even just using a Raspberry Pi with an external CD and thumb drive for storage should do the job if manually changing the CDs isn't a problem.