Question

cat5 connection for my boost?


I recently moved into a house that is wired for cat5. My Wi-Fi coverage is spotty with Comcast, so I have made all of the cat5 jacks hot to take anything that can be hardwired off the Wi-Fi.

My bridge is connected to my router, and I have a boost upstairs. 2 questions:
- Would it be valuable to hook the boost up to cat5, and is there any special set-up process to do this?
- Is there any value in hardwiring my pay 3s and 5s?

I stream Spotify all day, and my son is a gamer. We tax the heck out of our Wi-Fi.

Thanks.
-Grady

This topic has been closed for further comments. You can use the search bar to find a similar topic, or create a new one by clicking Create Topic at the top of the page.

25 replies

The more you can wire the better, so long as you don't run into STP problems. This is unlikely, and the symptom would be a complete network seizure.

If you can wire multiple players you can probably dispense with the BRIDGE and/or BOOST. Every Sonos unit can function as a 'bridge' between the wired segment and SonosNet wireless.
If you do in fact "tax the hell out of" your wifi, then yes, I'd be sure that the speakers are running on SonosNet, which would remove that bandwidth from your wifi. This requires only one Sonos device to be hardwired. In your case, the Bridge, which is designed for this purpose, is the best device. You could also wire the Boost upstairs, which would reinforce the SonosNet. In that case, it's acting just like a speaker would, and would be reinforcing the mesh of Sonosnet.

You could conceivably wire all the speakers with ethernet cable if you wanted. Unless you're having cutouts on the speakers, there's no significant advantage to doing so, unless you chose to dump SonosNet, and run off of "Standard" mode, which used your own wifi bandwidth, rather than the SonosNet bandwidth.
the Bridge, which is designed for this purpose, is the best device.
Actually it's probably the worst device. It can only talk SonosNet 1.0, whereas everything else in the OP's system supports SonosNet 2.0.
Ah, yes, I'm wrong. Again. Ah, well. In this case, i'd use the Boost wired to the router, and only throw the Bridge on the network upstairs, if there were dropouts.
In this case, i'd use the Boost wired to the router, and only throw the Bridge on the network upstairs, if there were dropouts.
Agreed! 🙂
awesome feedback, guys.

I'm about to sound dumb. I think I am in standard mode across my system. Can you point me to a link to do SonosNet?
awesome feedback, guys.

I'm about to sound dumb. I think I am in standard mode across my system. Can you point me to a link to do SonosNet?


If you have a unit connected via Ethernet, you are already in Boost or Sononet mode. Hardwiring a unit is how you activate Sonosnet mode.
okay, wait. I think I get it. By using one wired device (bridge, boost, etc.), that creates the SonosNet. Do I have that right? I think I'm not doing something right when I hardwire one of the speakers - meaning my SonosNet will not talk to the wired speakers...
Look in Settings/About My Sonos System. If the units show WM:0 they're on SonosNet. (WM:1 or WM:2 means they're on the WiFi instead.)
weird. my bridge shows WM:0, even though it is connected to the router.
No that's correct. It's not on WiFi.
okay. got it. i'm having an issue setting up the boost when hardwired. the steps work right, but I never get the blinking green. It just goes to solid white. I'll leep playing with it. the boost works fine on sonos-net, but I'm thinking I'll get better coverage if my bridge and boos are hardwired.

thanks again for the help.
You won't see blinking green if the BOOST has already been added to the system. Just wire it.
I think I got it now. the boost still shows up on the "about my sonos system" as WM:0 - meaning it is on the sonos-net.

thanks again! 🆒
the boost still shows up on the "about my sonos system" as WM:0 - meaning it is on the sonos-net.
Or wired. I was a bit inexact with my earlier comment.
everything is working now, but my controllers are wonky. everything seems to want to hook up to my old bridge - which is now upstairs connected to one of my cat5 connections. It disregards the boost that is attached directly to my router.

I think the next step is to unplug everything and start over from scratch with the boost hooked to the router.
If you are using an Android hosted controller, and it is still flaky in operation after the power cycling, try using the option in it to connect to Sonosnet, under advanced settings.
everything is working now, but my controllers are wonky. everything seems to want to hook up to my old bridge - which is now upstairs connected to one of my cat5 connections. It disregards the boost that is attached directly to my router.
How would you know? Have you been into the Network Matrix in the diagnostics?

If it's the case that all the players are wirelessly connecting to the BRIDGE, then simply put the BOOST on the upstairs Cat5 connection instead. And if the BRIDGE at the router is connecting to nothing else just turn it off.

I think the next step is to unplug everything and start over from scratch with the boost hooked to the router.

Starting over won't change anything. If the players are getting a better connection to a device wired to the upstairs Cat5 then they'll use it.
Why not just disconnect the bridge upstairs, and see what happens? I'm not really convinced you need it. I'd be willing to bet that the Boost, with its 2.0 Sonosnet connection, should be more than enough.
If there's a Cat5 connection upstairs and the wireless players prefer to connect to a device wired there, it's probably in a better location to serve them. (It's yet to be confirmed how the OP determines the wireless topology.)
Understood, but if he's connecting to that device (and that confuses me, shouldn't it be connecting to the Sonos system, no matter what device?) and it's causing him an issue, it might be better to remove that as a potential issue.
Wireless devices will connect via the path which 'costs' the least (STP root path cost, that is). This typically means they'll choose the superior wireless connection to any wired device. I understood -- perhaps incorrectly -- that connections were being made to the upstairs wired device, hence I inferred that it was better placed as regards reliability.
Agreed, I think I made a different inference, but I don't think either of us are incorrect, just without enough data. Your suggestions have always been spot on, in my opinion, but I like to offer alternate options, in case it helps. Usually, once you're on a thread, I try to not post, since you have a significant amount of more knowledge than I do 🙂
hey guys - really appreciate the dialogue. I'm running around right now, so my posts are not as frequent as I'd like them to be. I am able to get everything working as before with my boost connected to the router and everything else on SonosNet. As soon as I try to hardwire anything other than the boost, it all comes apart. My controllers (both PC and android) will not even find my sonos system, even though the music is playing.

The only thing I don't think I mentioned is that my home PC, one of the play 3s and my bridge are all upstairs running off the same cat5 port using a 4-port Linksys switch. It didn't seem like that should matter, but it now appears pertinent. Next time I get into diagnosis mode later this week, I will probably try plugging the bridge and the play 3 directly into other cat5 ports.

Regardless, everything is working for now as described above. I may just live with that setup, unless I start encountering drop-outs again.

Thx.
-Grady
Linksys switch? It would be helpful if you could describe your network in detail, including make/model.