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Cabling player1 where the wifi is bad


Hi, we have a google wifi network in our house, and several Sonos units. Sonos connects directly to the google wifi. At one of the bedrooms the wifi is really bad, but there is an ethernet plug in the wall that allows ethernet cable connection to the router. Would it be possible to cable the Sonos unit in this bedroom - just connect it with an ethernet cable to the router? Will all Sonoses still use the google wifi and not set up a separate 2.4Ghz Sonos wifinetwork?
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Best answer by ratty 1 July 2018, 16:52

What would be possible is to connect the bedroom Sonos unit to the switch. What happens if we do this? Then not one Sonos component, but two, are connected to the switch.
Yes! Do this. Which switch is it by the way? Most should be okay but if it's managed it may need a tweak to its config.

Will the Sonos components automatically understand that Sonos inter-communication should go through the wires?

It will favour the wired path where it can. Wireless units will connect to whichever wired unit offers the best connection.

Whys is it recommended to use SonosNet and not google wifi? Do you have to manually switch between networks (google wifi and sonosnet) on you mobile phone to manage the Sonos units (when they are on their own sonosnet network)?

For a Sonos system in WiFi ('Standard' mode) meshed WiFi systems can introduce potential problems. That's why Sonos typically recommend wiring a Sonos component -- to a LAN port on one of the meshed pods -- which puts the system into SonosNet mode.

You'd just use your phone as normal. The SonosNet mesh and WiFi mesh will be bridged together by the wired Sonos device. If your phone is an Android, Sonos also offers the option to attach it directly to SonosNet, using the players as access points. This is a bonus, not mandatory.
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once you plug in, sonosnet becomes active. So your other units will go to sonosnet. You will have 2 mesh wifi going one. But it offload traffic from your google wifi 2.4 network. But you just need to make sure the google wifi are not on the same channels to avoid problems of interference.
Ok, thanks a lot.
But will the sonosnet work when one of the Sonos units is located in a separate part of the house, where the wireless reception between it and the other Sonos units is bad? (and especially in this case - where the primary sonosnet device - the one that is cabled to the router - is the one far away).
The Sonos mesh network seems a bit similar to google wifi. With google wifi you can connect mesh units to wired ethernet and it will automatically understand that communication between devices should go over ethernet, not over wifi. I guess this is not so with Sonos?
If the remote Ethernet jack connects straight back to the router the problem you'll have is that it'll be on a different IP subnet to the Google WiFi. In mesh mode Google WiFi contains its own router, which doesn't have a 'bridge' option.

Assuming the entire Sonos system switches over to SonosNet mode, it would be inaccessible from the Google WiFi. If only some of the units flip over you'd end up with a mixed up mess.

Standard advice with Google WiFi is to run Sonos in SonosNet mode anyway, with a Sonos component wired to the primary Google pod. I'd recommend that you do that and find some way to transfer the bedroom's Ethernet feed to the same pod. You can always daisy-chain it off the second Ethernet port of the wired main Sonos component, assuming that has two ports.
I know that the google wifi has its own router. All google wifi units, and in particular the google wifi main unit (which runs the router) has two ethernet network ports - one for the wan, and one for the lan. I would like to connect a switch to the lan port. And then the Sonos unit to one of the switch ports. This way it would be on the same network as the wireless units.

I definitely do not want a mixed up mess..!!

Ok, SonosNet mode. One Sonos component is wired to the above mentioned switch.
I think daisy-chaining between bedroom Sonos unit and the main wired Sonos unit is going to be difficult because there is no ethernet infrastructure for this in the house, and we do not want to have visible cables in the house.
What would be possible is to connect the bedroom Sonos unit to the switch. What happens if we do this? Then not one Sonos component, but two, are connected to the switch. Will the Sonos components automatically understand that Sonos inter-communication should go through the wires? Or will it mess up the network - maybe create two SonosNets?

Whys is it recommended to use SonosNet and not google wifi? Do you have to manually switch between networks (google wifi and sonosnet) on you mobile phone to manage the Sonos units (when they are on their own sonosnet network)?
What would be possible is to connect the bedroom Sonos unit to the switch. What happens if we do this? Then not one Sonos component, but two, are connected to the switch.
Yes! Do this. Which switch is it by the way? Most should be okay but if it's managed it may need a tweak to its config.

Will the Sonos components automatically understand that Sonos inter-communication should go through the wires?

It will favour the wired path where it can. Wireless units will connect to whichever wired unit offers the best connection.

Whys is it recommended to use SonosNet and not google wifi? Do you have to manually switch between networks (google wifi and sonosnet) on you mobile phone to manage the Sonos units (when they are on their own sonosnet network)?

For a Sonos system in WiFi ('Standard' mode) meshed WiFi systems can introduce potential problems. That's why Sonos typically recommend wiring a Sonos component -- to a LAN port on one of the meshed pods -- which puts the system into SonosNet mode.

You'd just use your phone as normal. The SonosNet mesh and WiFi mesh will be bridged together by the wired Sonos device. If your phone is an Android, Sonos also offers the option to attach it directly to SonosNet, using the players as access points. This is a bonus, not mandatory.
Ok. Thanks a lot. This was clarifying.

The switch is a simple, unmanaged 6 or 8 port switch. I think it is FastEthernet, not Gigabit. It is lying around in the house so I was thinking about putting it to use instead of buying something new. The house has ethernet cables in the walls, which is great, however the house was built around 2000 so I suspect the cabels are Cat5. So I guess then it does not matter if the switch is FastEthernet because the cables too only support FastEthernet.

We have 4 Sonos units in total. I will connect 2 Sonos units to the switch. And have the two remaining Sonos units connect wirelessly. And hope that they all will end up on one Sonosnet. That would be by far the best design of this system, I think. I will do this tomorrow. Thanks for helping out, will post back if something does not work.
The vast majority of unmanaged switches are fine. Known exceptions are listed here.

And Sonos Ethernet ports are 10/100Mbps, so Gigabit is overkill.
Ok, thanks. I did not know.
Assuming the SonosNet configuration works nicely, go into Advanced Settings/Wireless Setup and remove/reset the stored Google WiFi credentials. This will stop any units from getting confused.
Ok. Sounds good, Thanks.
I guess this is also relevant:
Disabling the WiFi Link on a Sonos Music Player
https://bsteiner.info/articles/disabling-sonos-wifi
No! You could potentially cripple your system. That's an under-the-hood switch for disabling a player's radio entirely. If you did it to your wired players there'd be nothing for the wireless ones to connect to. And if you did it to the wireless ones they'd cut themselves off and vanish.

The 'Disabling the WiFi Link' title is misleading. It disables SonosNet. And moreover Sonos Support could refuse to support you if you get into trouble.

Follow my earlier directions to simply remove the Google WiFi details from the system.