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where is my music library actually stored?

  • 29 August 2014
  • 29 replies
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is it on my hardware or with Sonos?
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Best answer by Ryan S 5 September 2014, 00:32

Just confirming what Henrik said. The music library is still stored on your computer or networked location that you directed Sonos to. The players don't have the memory to store a music library on them.
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29 replies

Userlevel 2
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Sonos does only store information about where to find the music
Userlevel 7
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Just confirming what Henrik said. The music library is still stored on your computer or networked location that you directed Sonos to. The players don't have the memory to store a music library on them.
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Just confirming what Henrik said. The music library is still stored on your computer or networked location that you directed Sonos to. The players don't have the memory to store a music library on them.

Hi Ryan,
Further to your reply, could you pls clarify where the indexed metadata that is attached to a NAS Music Library is stored?
When such a NAS server is down or disconnected, Sonos controllers still have a detailed view of the library table of content (although actual files cannot be steamed of course). This content can still be browsed by title / genre / artist etc.
Where does Sonos store this metadata "database"?
Thanks!
Each Sonos device has its own copy of the index.
Where does Sonos store this metadata "database"?
In the non-volatile memory of each and every player.

You can display it if you point a browser to http://x.x.x.x:1400/status/tracks, where x.x.x.x is the IP address of a player.
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Where does Sonos store this metadata "database"?
In the non-volatile memory of each and every player.

You can display it if you point a browser to http://x.x.x.x:1400/status/tracks, where x.x.x.x is the IP address of a player.


Thank you so much for the information.
Do you know if a large-size index may at some point be an issue for the player to work proprely?
Do you know if a large-size index may at some point be an issue for the player to work proprely?
There's a hard ceiling of 65000 tracks in the library index. Long filenames and/or tag values can reduce the limit below that figure.

http://x.x.x.x:1400/status/tracks_summary is the place to check the status.

If long filenames become as issue there are workarounds such as renaming each file using just the track number. Sonos doesn't care what the file's called. A decent tag editor can rename all the files in one go, plus back up the current filename into a custom tag in case it's needed in the future.
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Thank you Ratty. I'm safe and way below the max count. Cheers
Thank you Ratty. I'm safe and way below the max count. Cheers
Also check Store Used vs Store Size and Entries Used vs Entries Size. These could possibly lower the limit.

You can ignore Conflicts .
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Thanks for the details.

Here's my summary:

Title
MAX 65000
COUNT 36244
Store Size 3604480
Store Used 2249140
Entries Size 262144
Entries Used 73152
(Conflicts 44885)

Looks like I have a bit of headroom, and no more vintage CDs to rip
Yes you're around 2/3 full, based on Store Used.
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Many thanks!
A decent tag editor can rename all the files in one go, plus back up the current filename into a custom tag in case it's needed in the future.

Any recommendations?
I'm very happy with Jaikoz on Mac, although I have never used it for an operation like ratty describes.
For reviews etc check http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/18360/jaikoz
Userlevel 6
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Any recommendations?
Many use Mp3tag which does the job quite nicely. I'm happy with it.
Where does Sonos store this metadata "database"?
In the non-volatile memory of each and every player.

You can display it if you point a browser to http://x.x.x.x:1400/status/tracks, where x.x.x.x is the IP address of a player.


Thank you so much for the information.
Do you know if a large-size index may at some point be an issue for the player to work proprely?


Any idea if that information can easily be edited ?

Any idea if that information can easily be edited ?


Edited? Yes, via a tag editor like MP3Tag. Edited directly from the index? No, and you wouldn't want to. The index is data derived from the tags located on the tracks in your library. Even if you could edit it, the edits would disappear the next time you re-indexed the tracks. You need to edit the tracks themselves to make the changes permanent.
Any idea if that information can easily be edited ?
You can't edit it directly. It's simply derived from the metadata extracted from the music files. Use a tag editor to change those.
Any idea if that information can easily be edited ?
You can't edit it directly. It's simply derived from the metadata extracted from the music files. Use a tag editor to change those.

Thanks Ratty, your suggestion worked out fine for me. I used a tag editor (Tag Editor Free + upgrade) and am making the changes in the source.
old thread but whenever i try http://x.x.x.x:1400/status/tracks_summary It just takes me to a blank page. I do add the IP of my player. any thoughts?
Userlevel 7
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Most all of the diagnostic pages were removed for security reasons and no longer work.
Userlevel 1
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Most all of the diagnostic pages were removed for security reasons and no longer work.

That's ridiculous ... and typical of SONOS's lack of concern about their customers.
Userlevel 7
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Most all of the diagnostic pages were removed for security reasons and no longer work.

That's ridiculous ... and typical of SONOS's lack of concern about their customers.


I agree that it's a shame but seeing as Sonos have made this change in order to protect users from security threats to their network to suggest it is as a result of a lack of concern for customers is ridiculous in the extreme


That's ridiculous ... and typical of SONOS's lack of concern about their customers.


You have 12 posts in the last 10 months, every one of them is more critical of Sonos (not to mention insulting to their staff) than the last.

Which begs the question, why exactly do you own Sonos?


I agree that it's a shame but seeing as Sonos have made this change in order to protect users from security threats to their network to suggest it is as a result of a lack of concern for customers is ridiculous in the extreme


Not to mention it was done to protect those who opened their port 1400 to the public, so I'd say Sonos is bending over backwards to protect their customers, even from their own stupidity.