Support high resolution files


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I purchase lots of high res FLAC files from hdtracks.com, but I can't play them on SONOS as high res FLAC files are not supported. Please add support for high res FLAC files: Reference: https://www.hdtracks.com/index.php https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/80/kw/Music+Formats#var_f

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Thank you for the feedback. At this time, Sonos does not have plans to add support for high resolution audio files, including high resolution FLAC. This topic will remain open for further discussion.
Fairsharemusic sell music in high res flac that Sonos don't support
Userlevel 1
This is an unfortunate - and I'd suggest misdirected - decision on the part of Sonos' product manager(s). While I understand that only a small segment of Sonos customers may understand or care about the growing supply of high-res source material, that segment is also the most passionate about their music. Consequently they're the most likely to invest in new products - say, a high-res add-on or replacement for my current CONNECT - and also most likely to influence others & promote the Sonos brand. I believe there's a great opportunity to capture the market of music/audio enthusiasts who care about quality but can't afford the $10K+ entry price of a Sooloos or comparable system. So please reconsider your response. Sonos promotes itself as a group of true music lovers and audiophiles... so don't contradict your own branding by ignoring the evolution of quality sound.
Userlevel 2
Please reconsider your want of 192/24 downloads, your ears will hear nothing but extra modulation noise that is not part of what was recorded and building hardware and speakers to cope well with ultrasonic frequencies will lead to otherwise unnecessary compromises in the actual audible range: http://people.xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html I don't want more expensive equipment that makes compromises for something that no human can hear.
+1 to hne's response. Follow his link, it will show you not only is 24 bit 96/192 audio not an "evolution of quality sound", it can in fact cause a degradation of the sound quality due to intermodulation in the electronics needed for reproduction.
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I am well aware of that position, regardless, I have paid for music in that format, and I want Sonos to play it in whatever quality possible on EXISTING equipment. I am not asking you to approve of that format, the same way I'm not asking you to approve of my taste in music 😉
It is not a "postition", it is a scientific fact, proven by audible testing. The same testing which refutes any quality differences between 24/96 and 16/44.1. Just thought I'd put that out there. Either way, you can easily convert those files to 16/44.1, thus removing the possibility for bad intermodulation effects and making them playable by Sonos. There are literally hundeds of programs which will do this, such as Media Monkey and dBPoweramp. This in no way compromises your original files, and you can get all the quality of the originals without any harmful intermodulation effects for use in your Sonos library. Somehow I do not think you are going to want to do this. However, since Sonos has marked this Idea as "Unplanned", I will still list this alternative for those who do not buy the hirez snakeoil and prefer their music without the introduction of audible distortion which accompanies the "evolution of quality sound" that is hirez music. Cheers!
Userlevel 2
Let me reiterate that I'm not asking Sonos to introduce new hardware capable of higher bitrates or higher resolution DAC's, I just want them to play these files on the existing equipment. As you point out yourself, the files can be converted "without any harmful intermodulation", and in the same way they can be converted on-the-fly and played without me having to keep separate copies just for Sonos.
I'm doubtful the Sonos boxes have the horsepower to transcode on the fly. Transcoding takes a pretty powerful processor. Personally, I would simply do it once and get it over with, rather than sit around waiting for Sonos to do something which they have already marked "Not Planned." YMMV.
the discussion about 24 bits is an open item for so long Sonos is getting pushed out of the market if they are capable to fix that point in a very short term tons of guys like big player as Pionner Denon Marantz Yamaha are coming with streamer playing any king of bit rates move guy before it will too late
Userlevel 1
Please reconsider and look at adding support for 24bit FLAC files in the next generation of SONOS devices.
Having seen a sonos system for the first time last week when my brother got 2 play 3's 2 play 5's ipod doc and a sub I was pretty impressed with the setup and Ipad control. I would by a Sonos connect tomorrow for my existing setup using the digital output into my Cyrus Dac/Amp. I have just gone on the the sonos site for the first time a few hours ago to find what they can do for me. Trouble is I have a lot of 24bit flac on my pc so for this reason alone I would not get consider going down the sonos route. So Sonos miss out on £270 odd quid due to me not buying - not true. No doubt I would slowly add sonos units over a period of time when I could afford it - a 3 for the kitchen maybe a 3 in the bedroom, then maybe a 5 and a sub. before you know it the figure grows to a few grand of purchases. So Sonos, you are really missing a trick here especially with many audiophiles who spend $$$ on their systems. Sure 24bit flac might no be that much better in quality (as some suggest) but it stops people like me buying their first bit of sonos kit , stopping any future addons. I guess I will stick to my HTPC, TV and Amp for now. I would really seriously consider adding 24bit support for your systems before your competitors begin to take business away from you.
People have been asking Sonos to implement hires for at least 5 years with claims that lack of support will somehow result in them being excluded from the market. Years later, and these deluded predictions have yet to be proven even remotely true and yet still they continue to be glibly made. In that time Sonos has significantly grown it's market share whilst the only main competitor that does support hires (Logitech) has retreated from the market. Based on this real-world data, it seems support for hires is NOT the thing to do in order to grow your market. It's clear the people making such irrational warnings are talking utter rubbish! Realistically the requirement for hires is niche: for every person that feels it's important there's probably 100,000 or more who either don't care or know enough to understand the audible benefits are, at best, negligible (and, potentially, hires formats can damage your audio). For those that want to take advantage of the very real benefits of the superior mixing and mastering that is available on many tracks marketed as "hires", you can perform a one-time conversion them to a format Sonos can play and retain the full audio quality.
Userlevel 2
The whole point is that I should not have to convert my collection to a format just so that Sonos can play it, especially when my other players have no problem with these files. This is not about audio quality, not about new hardware, this is about audio format compatibility, and using an updated FLAC code library.
And that's a reasonable request, although I would point out that you have purchased music in a non-standard format that actually isn't that widely supported (most portable players won't support it, for instance). Perhaps you should campaign some of these vendors to make these superior quality masters available in more standard formats. Regardless, it's still a reasonable request, even if your unwillingness to convert files to a more standard format (which, by the way, all your other music players will also play) probably isn't enough to compel Sonos to embark on a significant and costly development exercise. My point is it is diluted by all of the irrational, made-up nonsense about hires being a significant segment of the market and Sonos losing market share by not supporting it (not from you, but from others).
Userlevel 1
The audio formats offered by SONOS will soon be exceeded by the audio on HDvideo streams....?
The audio formats offered by SONOS will soon be exceeded by the audio on HDvideo streams....?
When you can perfectly sync up 32 HD video streams on 32 monitors, then you have a point. Anybody can stream 24/96 to a single streamer, there are dozens of them out there (well, "dozens" - 1, now that Squeezebox crashed and burned). Nobody has ever streamed 24/96 in perfect sync, to up to 32 players at once, some of which can/cannot actually play the stream. There's the problem, not whether someone else can stream higher bandwidth to a single unit.
I would replace my connect if it were able to stream 96/24 to my amp. Perhaps a new version of connect with hdmi output? I have many dvdaudio discs that I have ripped to hard disc, retiring my dvdaudio player. In most cases there are also 5.1 versions of the same album on the disc (Metallica "black" album, deep purple "machine head" etc). I do not expect to be able to stream hi resolution flac/wav to my 5's but I would hope to be able to stream to a connect that then feeds my living room amplifier. Sonos, more websites are appearing offering hd audio (hdtracks.com for example). Please consider at least being able to support an emerging market of audiophile quality music, otherwise your mantra of all your music available everywhere, will be inaccurate!
Thank you for the feedback. At this time, Sonos does not have plans to add support for high resolution audio files, including high resolution FLAC. This topic will remain open for further discussion.
hi-def music files are the future of music everybody knows this. MP3 is dying (thankfully) and CD quality downloads will follow. This should be a Sonos priority. We have the technology Scotty. Pioneer wireless is already marketing 96khz 24b at 'mass market' audio shops. hi def music is not some fringe group of audio-nuts, it is coming to the mass market.Time to step up Sonos.
Thank you for the feedback. At this time, Sonos does not have plans to add support for high resolution audio files, including high resolution FLAC. This topic will remain open for further discussion.
Do you have links to any marketing studies or sales trends which show this decidedly unorthodox analysis to be true?
Thank you for the feedback. At this time, Sonos does not have plans to add support for high resolution audio files, including high resolution FLAC. This topic will remain open for further discussion.
With respect User777223, people have been saying this for 7 years, and there's no sign of it happening. I'm certainly in favour of CD quality downloads, but I don't see any evidence this is happening either, nor that MP3 is "dying" as a download format. I also don't see the point in hires until, at least, we are back to CD quality (which all of the download services could offer, across their whole catalogues, with very little effort or cost, and which everyone can use). Comparatively there is a vanishingly small amount of hires material. I've also not met anyone who actually understands audio engineering and digital audio formats who believes there is any point to hires as a distribution/listening format. The main driver for hires is "high-end" audio companies who are running out of reasons for people to buy their kit, and the magazines whose revenue is primarily driven by the former. Hires is a great new excuse to sell kit/magazines, and most of the people promoting it are those with an expensive product to sell, and a small market of relatively gullible "audio-nuts" who are only too happy to not challenge their pseudo-scientific nonsense and to believe their inexpert reviews. Whatever Pioneer, or Linn, or Paul Simon have as aspirations to make Hires into mass market, to date they are utterly failing. Even assuming they get traction and increase the market for hires at an unprecedented rate, it will be 5-7 years before it could be considered "mainstream".
Thank you for the feedback. At this time, Sonos does not have plans to add support for high resolution audio files, including high resolution FLAC. This topic will remain open for further discussion.
In addition to Majiks's comments, I'd like to say the fact "Pioneer wireless is already marketing 96khz 24b at 'mass market' audio shops" means nothing. SACD and DVD-A were marketed in DVD players you could purchase at Wall-Mart. Not just "audio shops", not just Best Buy; we are talking WALL-MART! How'd that work out for SACD and DVD-A?
I have been buying music from the website HDtracks.com. I am unhappy to now realise that sonos's promise of all music available everywhere wirelessly, falls short. The system on the pc will not even recognise the existence of my 96/24 tracks (flac or wav). Worse still, I have some 5.1 at the same high bitrate. These also are not recognised. When will sonos include support for streaming hidef audio to my sonos connect (which I have connected via spdif to my amp)? If there is insufficient bandwidth across the optical, will sonos eventually bring out a connect with hdmi for multichannel connectivity to amps?

I am willing to repurchase in order to allow hi def playback. This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Hi def and surround sound track support *please*!.
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I just thought I'd pitch in. The way we solved the problem with HD audio is really quite simple if slightly spaceconsuming. We have all our music stored centrally, in its original format (all the way up to 24/384) and pristine condition for backup purposes, and use dbpoweramp to convert this music to suitable formats onto other disks. We have metadata stored in a database, to make changes easier across versions, but that is merely a nice-to-have. There are other ways to solve that problem. Files that are converted are placed in four different locations; one for 24/92, one for iTunes one for Sonos and one for portables (car and walkman etc). Whenever we get a new record, it is thrown into the pot and batch converted. We have Sonos in 5 rooms serving synced music 95% of the time, iTunes for syncing with iPods and 3 Squeezeboxes (one of which has been demoted to the garage and another used for special purposes in my music study). We have solved the 24-bit limitation in a very simple way. The power DAC we have in the living room can handle 4 digital sources, so we simply attached our Transporter alongside the Sonos Connect. Whenever I get that tickling sensation, I just switch and play the Transporter instead. In situations like that I don't need to sync anything anyway - just have complete silence everywhere else in the house. So instead of replacing one system with the other, we let them complement eachother, exactly like a CD player doesn't [necessarily] replace a turntable.
Userlevel 1
I wish Sonos would not ignore this request. Downsampling hires is not straight forward and the quality of the downsampled version depends heavily on the sample rate converter used. Whilst this is not noticeable on sonos speakers it can be on systems connected to a high end dac. Whilst I can envisage streaming hires to multiple devices is problematic is there not a way for now to just allow the Connect to pass high res via its digital output?