Question

Streaming from NAS drive

  • 22 November 2017
  • 18 replies
  • 6231 views

I am thinking of moving away from my traditional hi-fi, and buying several bits of Sonos kit to replace, but can anyone tell me if I can stream from a NAS drive (thinking of a WD My Cloud Home) to Sonos speakers ?

This topic has been closed for further comments. You can use the search bar to find a similar topic, or create a new one by clicking Create Topic at the top of the page.

18 replies

Yes, I have one doing just that for a 5 zone Sonos set up for three years now, and working flawlessly.
Yes, you can set up a share and stream your local library from an NAS. Many use the WD models, including myself.
Userlevel 5
Badge +9
But you can’t stream high bitrate files above the Sonos native redbook format, correct? However, it can be done through Roon and any NAS or hard drive connected to a Roon core computer. I doubt anyone would invest in Roon just for this, but since I have Roon for other reasons it is handy for playing high bit rate files to Sonos. Roon will transcode to a Sonos-friendly format. This includes NASs such as Synologies, WD MyClouds and plain ordinary external drives. Plex also supposedly works with Sonos (beta), but in my experience it has been a total bust. I gave up on Plex with Sonos, although it works well for video streaming.
Who said anything about streaming above Redbook?
Userlevel 5
Badge +9
Many of us have files of higher resolutions. I’m pointing this out in case the poster has any of those. Thanks for the snarky response. I’d hate to think you’re mellowing with age,
Many of us have files of higher resolutions. I’m pointing this out in case the poster has any of those. Thanks for the snarky response. I’d hate to think you’re mellowing with age,

But Sonos can't stream hi-res files from anywhere, not just an NAS, and his question was specifically about streaming from an NAS. Why not tell him he can't stream local Audible files, copy protected iTunes, Media Monkey's APE, WMA Lossless, or any other unsupported format; all of which (with the possible exception of APE) are far more common than Hi-res?

Just another case of a poster shoehorning their off-topic agenda into yet another thread.
Userlevel 5
Badge +9
Many of us have files of higher resolutions. I’m pointing this out in case the poster has any of those. Thanks for the snarky response. I’d hate to think you’re mellowing with age,

But Sonos can't stream hi-res files from anywhere, not just an NAS, and his question was specifically about streaming from an NAS. Why not tell him he can't stream local Audible files, copy protected iTunes, Media Monkey's APE, WMA Lossless, or any other unsupported format; all of which (with the possible exception of APE) are far more common than Hi-res?

Just another case of a poster shoehorning their off-topic agenda into yet another thread.


What a load of nonsense. I was simply trying to be helpful. Of course, as the resident snark, anything you don't consider to be helpful must be immediately dissected and denigrated by you. The subject of higher resolution files comes up frequently in this community, and the original poster is obviously thinking of migrating to Sonos from an existing system that includes his own files. It is quite possible that some of those files might be high resolution. You are correct about other formats, and since you have just named them all, I won't have to. Nor will I respond with the childish comment: " who said anything about local Audible files, copy protected iTunes, Media Monkey's APE, WMA Lossless, or any other unsupported format."
Although I know you fancy yourself as such, I have seen nothing that anointed you the arbiter of what can be discussed here. So why not resist the temptation, from time to time, to get your snark on? I realize you have been very helpful to many here, including me. But that does not give you the right to interject when no interjection is required or desired.
As far as your comment about "another case of a poster shoehorning their off-topic agenda into yet another thread" is concerned, I have no idea whatsoever what this "agenda" might be. Nor, honestly, do I care what you might perceive as anyone's "agenda". Clearly, however, you have your own. And sometimes it is not pretty.
Userlevel 5
Badge +12
I use a 3tb WD My Cloud NAS, works perfectly with my Sonos setup. Just make sure any NAS you buy is still SMBv1 compliant/ capable.

For me I ripped all my CD's to FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec) and serve the from the NAS.

I think Sonos may have issues if you use "Power Saving Mode" as the drive has to spin up, mine is always on.
Badge
I use QNAP NAS and works perfectly with Sonos.
Only one person in here misunderstood the question to be anything except can Sonos stream from an NAS, not Plex, not Roon, not hi-Res audio; simply can you stream from a WD NAS.
Userlevel 5
Badge +9
I use QNAP NAS and works perfectly with Sonos.
I would recommend anyone making a NAS decision to go with something more robust than the WD MyCloud offerings, such as QNAP or Synology. This provides more leeway for expansion into video streaming, auto downloading and a host of other internet services and other things the WDs can’t do. I own MyClouds, and they’re fine for basic needs. I also own Synologys. If you see more streaming in your future, going a little higher up the ladder is worth considering.
Userlevel 5
Badge +9
Only one person in here misunderstood the question to be anything except can Sonos stream from an NAS, not Plex, not Roon, not hi-Res audio; simply can you stream from a WD NAS.
Give it up. You’re behaving like a child. Everyone understands that discussions expand and that people make suggestions. Except, apparently, you.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
I'd recommend just the opposite, instead of getting a high end NAS for Sonos and other use get something cheap for Sonos use and put nothing important on it, if you have important stuff put that on a high end NAS.

I was a WD Live Drive fan for some time but I've had two issues with mine. It is electrically noisy and needs to be kept several feet from any Sonos component and more important, WD stops doing security updates at some point leaving you with an un-trustable device.

I went with a Raspberry Pi and an external SSD for my music. Under $50 for all but the drive and it is rock solid. A larger SD card, thumb drive or external spinning rust drive will all work too but the SSD is silent and low power plus has no need to sleep to save wear.
Userlevel 5
Badge +9
I'd recommend just the opposite, instead of getting a high end NAS for Sonos and other use get something cheap for Sonos use and put nothing important on it, if you have important stuff put that on a high end NAS.

I was a WD Live Drive fan for some time but I've had two issues with mine. It is electrically noisy and needs to be kept several feet from any Sonos component and more important, WD stops doing security updates at some point leaving you with an un-trustable device.

I went with a Raspberry Pi and an external SSD for my music. Under $50 for all but the drive and it is rock solid. A larger SD card, thumb drive or external spinning rust drive will all work too but the SSD is silent and low power plus has no need to sleep to save wear.


I get it. To each his own, and I did pretty much what you are doing for some time. It works fine. I just find a Synology (or QNAP) brings more to the table. I consider my music files to be important. But that’s not really the issue, since I back up everything in my network. I prefer my Synology because I can more easily automate tasks (including raid mirroring or backups), I find access from both inside and outside the network easier and more reliable (I frequently move between two countries) and my Synology has a wide range of apps that allow it to do things that my WDs can’t do. In other words, it’s a mini storage computer. I use it for music and video (with auto downloading apps to automatically nab my favorite TV shows while in Brasil, with no human intervention needed). I also find the Synology easier to access from many media streamers, although the WDs will work with a little more tinkering. Plus, my Synology was at the heart of my whole-house wired network before I bought Sonos gear, so for me it was a no brainer. In fact, I have Synologies in Brasil and one in Canada. Both are working away in the background whether I’m there or not.
I have Pis connected to my Synologies via my wired network as endpoints for other music needs, mostly as intermediaries to pass on music managed by other programs (such as Roon) to DAC/amps for headphone listening. Of course, these are the same files I would play on Sonos gear. They all reside on the NAS. Just as important to me is the video side of things. My TV shows and music files remain on the Synology, auto backed up daily. I’m also an amateur photographer with about 100,000 images on the Synology, which are easier to manage and access from various locations. That may not be the case for long because I’ve switched to Adobe’s Creative Cloud. But I still need a safe home for the originals that can be accessed from anywhere in the worlld should I run into cloud problems.
My advice applies mainly to those starting from scratch and deciding which NAS gear to purchase. If you already have a WD MyCloud Or MyDrive it might make sense to go with that. But if you’re making an initial purchase it might not cost all that much more to step up to a Synology/QNAP. Of course, both brands offer a wide range of products, so it’s easy to get carried away.
That’s my two cents’ worth. I don’t think you could go too far wrong doing it either my way or your way.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
My major heartburn with an everything NAS is having to enable SMB v1 although I'm hearing that a patch may be available to close much of that security issue. I don't need security issues with my real data!

I don't think much about the Raspberry Pi or the music there, it is just copies of my collection, replacing it is a couple clicks and a half hour wait worst case. My real NAS for my real data is a lot more complicated but none of that is needed for serving music files to Sonos.

The only way I don't recommend is the WD route due to the expense of replacing them every few years when WD abandons the older models and leaves you stranded. Over time the real NAS is going to prove cheaper and the PI is going to get security updates longer so both are better options.
Userlevel 5
Badge +9
Actually I don’t keep personal or work files on my Synology. Just music, video and photos. The sensitive files stay on my desktop with encrypted cloud backup. So far, so good.
For the OP: if you have a router with modern processor capability and a USB socket, also consider just a stick; these are now quite cheap for up to 128gB and may well suffice for music needs. Their advantage is no footprint, no need for a power source, and no moving parts like a spinning disc, so an undisturbed stick ought to live long.

And before you invest time in ripping all CDs consider streaming services as an option. You may want those to stop buying new CDs like I did a few years ago, and leverage them for existing CDs as well.

And I certainly can't hear much audible differences except for the fact that streaming service sound levels are a little lower compared to my ripped CDs, but that just needs a one time recalibration of the volume level settings to be applied.
Badge
Shoot. I hoped I could use my high res files from my Synology NAS but it looks like Sonos hasn’t solved that yet.